Brain

now browsing by category

The gut and the brain are not separate, they work together for optimal health.

 
Posted by: | Posted on: August 1, 2019

Common OTC drugs can cause dementia

Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola Fact Checked – August 01, 2019
Reproduced from original article:
https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/08/01/anticholinergic-medications-and-dementia.aspx

Story at-a-glance

  • Anticholinergic drugs block acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that performs important functions in your brain and peripheral and central nervous systems
  • In your brain, acetylcholine plays a key role in attention, concentration, memory formation and consolidation, which is why anticholinergic drugs can cause symptoms identical to dementia
  • Research assessing effects of anticholinergics found statistically significant associations between dementia and anticholinergic antidepressants, antiparkinson drugs, antipsychotic drugs, bladder antimuscarinics and antiepileptic drugs
  • Many common over-the-counter drugs contain anticholinergic ingredients, including antihistamine medications sold under the brand names Benadryl and Chlor-Trimeton, sleep aids such as Tylenol PM, Aleve PM and Unisom, the motion sickness medication Dramamine and various cold medicines
  • In the case of Benadryl and many sleep aids the anticholinergic ingredient in question is diphenhydramine. In Chlor-Trimeton it’s chlorpheniramine; in many cold medicines, it’s pyrilamine

According to the latest statistics1 for 2019, 14% of Americans aged 71 or older have some form of dementia. Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most severe and lethal form of dementia, affects an estimated 5.8 million Americans. Of those, 81% are over the age of 75, but approximately 200,000 are younger than 65. In all, 1 in 10 seniors over the age of 65 has Alzheimer’s dementia.

Due to the high prevalence of dementia and the scarcity of effective conventional treatments, prevention is paramount. I’ve written many articles on this topic, highlighting several of the most important prevention strategies, including dietary recommendations and the need for exercise, sun exposure and avoidance of toxins.

One risk factor that has received far less attention is medication side effects, which we’ll focus on here. One class of drugs shown to be of great concern in this regard are anticholinergics — drugs that block acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that performs important functions in your brain and peripheral and central nervous systems.

In your nervous systems, it acts both as an activator and an inhibitor,2 which is in part why it’s used in such a wide variety of drugs. For example, acetylcholine triggers muscle contractions and pain responses, and is involved in the regulation of your endocrine system and REM sleep cycle.

In your brain, it’s a key player in attention, concentration,3,4 memory formation and consolidation,5 which is precisely why these drugs can cause symptoms identical to dementia.

Acetylcholine blockers can trigger dementia symptoms

Anticholinergic drugs are prescribed for a wide variety of conditions, including depression, incontinence, diarrhea, dizziness, motion sickness, insomnia, allergies and epilepsy.6,7 You can find a long list of anticholinergic drugs and the different conditions they’re used for on seniorlist.com.8 As reported in a July 2019 article on KHN.org:9

“By all accounts the woman, in her late 60s, appeared to have severe dementia. She was largely incoherent. Her short-term memory was terrible. She couldn’t focus on questions that medical professionals asked her.

But Dr. Malaz Boustani, a professor of aging research at Indiana University School of Medicine, suspected something else might be going on. The patient was taking Benadryl for seasonal allergies, another antihistamine for itching, Seroquel (an antipsychotic medication) for mood fluctuations, as well as medications for urinary incontinence and gastrointestinal upset.

To various degrees, each of these drugs blocks an important chemical messenger in the brain, acetylcholine. Boustani thought the cumulative impact might be causing the woman’s cognitive difficulties. He was right.”

As the patient was taken off these medications over a period of six months, she made what appeared to be a “miraculous” recovery; her scores on the Mini-Mental State Exam going from indicating severe dementia back to normal.

Recent research highlights risks of anticholinergic drugs

A June 2019 study10 in JAMA that assessed the dementia risk associated with various anticholinergic drugs found the link was strongest for:

  • Antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants such as imipramine,11 doxepine or amitriptyline have strong anticholinergic effects, whereas SSRIs such as citalopram and duloxetine have lower anticholinergic effects12)
  • Antiparkinson drugs
  • Antipsychotics (such as clozapine,13 chlorpromazine or olanzapine14)
  • Bladder antimuscarinics (such as oxybutynin or tolterodine,15 prescribed for overactive bladder)
  • Antiepileptic drugs (such as oxcarbazepine or carbamazepine16)

A case-control study17 published in 2018 in the BMJ — which like the JAMA study just mentioned looked at the effects of various classes of anticholinergics — also found that antidepressant, urological and antiparkinson drugs posed the greatest risk.

Similarly, an earlier study,18 published in JAMA Internal Medicine in 2015, found “Higher cumulative anticholinergic medication use is associated with an increased risk for dementia,” including Alzheimer’s, and that anticholinergic use should be minimized to avoid this medication-related risk.

Overall, high use of anticholinergic medications for three years or more was associated with a 54% increased risk for dementia, compared to nonuse.19 What’s more, they concluded that this heightened risk remained even after the drug or drugs were discontinued.

According to KHN,20 a new trial will look into this further, to see whether patients taking anticholinergics whose cognition has already started to decline can regain their brain function, or whether the drugs’ effects have a more permanent impact.

Advertisement

Buy 2 Get 1 FREE on Select Full Spectrum Hemp Oil Advanced


Many nonprescription drugs have anticholinergic effects

Importantly, anticholinergics are not just by prescription. Many common over-the-counter drugs contain anticholinergic ingredients as well. These include21 antihistamine medications sold under the brand names Benadryl and Chlor-Trimeton, sleep aids such as Tylenol PM, Aleve PM and Unisom, the motion sickness medication Dramamine and various cold medicines.22

In the case of Benadryl and many sleep aids the anticholinergic ingredient in question is diphenhydramine. In Chlor-Trimeton it’s chlorpheniramine; in many cold medicines, it’s pyrilamine.23

Since there are so many different drug ingredients with anticholinergic effects, it can be rather difficult to identify them, making concurrent use of more than one anticholinergic likely in many instances. The end result could be severe dementia-like symptoms, as those experienced by Boustani’s patient.

So, for your own safety, take the time to investigate all medications you take on a regular or even semi-regular basis, including OTC drugs, to identify the ones with anticholinergic effects. Do not assume your doctor will keep track of this or warn you of the dangers of anticholinergics. As noted by KHN:24

“‘Physicians often attribute anticholinergic symptoms in elderly people to aging or age-related illness rather than the effects of drugs,’ according to a research review25 by physicians at the Medical University of South Carolina and in Britain.”

Unfortunately, medication side effects are rarely the first suspect when new disease symptoms appear, which is why it’s so important to do your research and know what the possible side effects are.

A list of anticholinergic ingredients used in antihistamines, antiparkinson drugs, muscle relaxants, antiarrhythmics, antidepressants, antimuscarinics for urinary incontinence, antipsychotics, antispasmodics and antiemetics can be found at the bottom of Drugs.com’s “Anticholinergic Drugs to Avoid in the Elderly” page.26

The importance of choline for dementia prevention

Choline27 is a precursor to acetylcholine and is an essential nutrient not only for your brain and nervous system but also your cardiovascular function. The Institute of Medicine officially recognized choline as an essential nutrient for human health in 1998.28

Aided by a transporter protein, choline combines with acetyl coenzyme A at the neuron terminal to form the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Adequate amounts of choline must be available in your brain at all times, in order for your neurons to function properly.29 Choline has also been shown to protect against Alzheimer’s by:30

  • Reducing your homocysteine level, an amino acid that has been shown to cause neurodegeneration and is involved in the formation of amyloid plaques, two hallmarks of Alzheimer’s. Choline converts homocysteine into methionine, which has a number of beneficial effects.
  • Inhibiting microglia activation. Microglia cells clear debris from your brain, and while this is a crucial function, in Alzheimer’s the microglia have a tendency to become overactivated, causing inflammation in the brain that can result in the death of neurons. By reducing activation of microglia, choline can help protect Alzheimer’s patients from further brain damage.

Other health benefits of choline

Choline is also involved in the synthesis of phospholipids required for healthy cell structures. The most common phospholipid is phosphatidylcholine, better known as lecithin, which constitutes between 40% and 50% of your cellular membranes.31 Choline is also required for:32

  • Mitochondrial function — A 2014 study33 found choline is important for healthy mitochondrial membranes in liver cells, and an animal study34 published in 2010 also reported choline-deficient diets impaired cognition and motor coordination by causing mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain. As noted by the authors, their findings “underline that, similar to the liver, the brain also needs an adequate choline supply for its normal functioning.”
  • Healthy fetal development35 Choline is required for proper neural tube closure,36 brain development and healthy vision.37 Research shows mothers who get sufficient choline impart lifelong memory enhancement to their child due to changes in the development of the hippocampus (memory center) of the child’s brain.38
  • Epigenetic regulation of gene expression — As explained in a 2013 paper,39 “Dietary intake of methyl donors like choline influences the methylation of DNA and histones, thereby altering the epigenetic regulation of gene expression.”
  • Fat transport and metabolism — Choline is needed to carry cholesterol from your liver; choline deficiency could result in excess fat and cholesterol buildup resulting in fatty liver disease.40,41

Studies have linked higher choline intake to a range of benefits, including a decreased risk of death from heart disease,42 a 24% decreased risk for breast cancer,43 and the prevention of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).44,45,46

In fact, choline appears to be a key controlling factor in the development of fatty liver, as it enhances secretion of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles in your liver, which in turn are required to safely transport fat out of your liver.47 Research has also discovered evidence of epigenetic mechanisms of choline,48 which also helps explain how choline helps maintain healthy liver function.

Are you getting enough choline to protect your health?

While a dietary reference intake value has not yet been established for choline, the Institute of Medicine set an “adequate daily intake” value of 550 milligrams per day for adult men and 425 mg for adult women49 for the prevention of liver damage.

Keep in mind, however, that requirements can vary widely, depending on your overall diet, age, ethnicity50 and genetic makeup.51 Pregnant and breastfeeding women, athletes and postmenopausal women typically need higher amounts, and eating a diet high in (otherwise healthy) saturated fats may also increase your choline requirement.52

The tolerable upper intake level for choline is 3.5 grams per day. Side effects of excessive choline include low blood pressure, sweating, diarrhea and a fishy body odor.53

Eggs are a primary source of choline in the diet; with more than 100 mg of choline per egg yolk,54,55 they’re an easy way to ensure sufficiency. Other healthy choline sources56 include organic grass fed beef organ meats (kidney and liver), wild-caught Alaskan salmon, organic pastured chicken or turkey. Supplementation, including with krill oil, is another option if you’re concerned about getting enough choline from your diet.

Sources and References
Posted by: | Posted on: July 11, 2019

Anticholinergic drugs increase your risk for dementia

Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola Fact Checked
anticholinergic medication and dementia

Story at-a-glance

  • While dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (the most advanced, severe and lethal form of dementia) are primarily diet- and lifestyle-driven, certain medications can also ramp up your risk
  • One of the riskiest classes of drugs in this regard are anticholinergic drugs, prescribed for a wide variety of conditions, including depression, incontinence, insomnia, allergies and epilepsy
  • Recent research assessing effects of 56 anticholinergics found statistically significant associations between dementia and anticholinergic antidepressants, antiparkinson drugs, antipsychotic drugs, bladder antimuscarinics and antiepileptic drugs
  • In the highest exposure group (excess of 1,095 standardized daily doses over the past one to 11 years before diagnosis), the odds ratio for dementia was between 44% and 54%, with an average of 49%; anticholinergic antipsychotics raise risk by 70%
  • A 2009 scientific review found all but two of 27 studies found an association between the anticholinergic activity of medications and either delirium, cognitive impairment or dementia

While dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (the most advanced, severe and lethal form of dementia) are primarily diet- and lifestyle-driven, certain medications can also ramp up your risk.

One of the riskiest classes of drugs in this regard are anticholinergic drugs, prescribed for such widely varying conditions such as depression, incontinence, insomnia, allergies and epilepsy.1 You can find a long list of anticholinergic drugs and the different conditions they’re used for on seniorlist.com.2

Anticholinergic drugs block acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that performs important functions in your peripheral and central nervous systems, both as an activator and an inhibitor.3

For example, it triggers muscle contractions and pain responses, and is involved in the regulation of your endocrine system and REM sleep cycle. Of all the known neurotransmitters, acetylcholine is the most abundant.4

As reported by CNN,5 a recent observational study6 looking at anticholinergics and dementia risk “suggests that the link is strongest for … antidepressants such as paroxetine or amitriptyline, bladder antimuscarinics such as oxybutynin or tolterodine, antipsychotics such as chlorpromazine or olanzapine and antiepileptic drugs such as oxcarbazepine or carbamazepine.”

Study highlights risks of anticholinergic drugs

The research,7,8 published online in JAMA Internal Medicine, June 24, 2019, assessed data from 58,769 patients over the age of 55 diagnosed with dementia and 225,574 matched controls.

In all, the outcomes for 56 different anticholinergic drugs were assessed by looking at exposure to “standardized daily doses” of the drugs prescribed over the previous one to 11 years before the patient received a diagnosis of dementia.

After controlling for confounding variables that might influence the results, the researchers concluded “there were statistically significant associations of dementia risk with exposure to anticholinergic antidepressants, antiparkinson drugs, antipsychotic drugs, bladder antimuscarinics and antiepileptic drugs.”

Compared to those who did not use anticholinergic drugs, those in the lowest exposure group (taking between just one and 90 standardized doses over the previous one to 11 years), the adjusted odds ratio for dementia was, on average, 6%.

In the highest exposure group (excess of 1,095 standardized daily doses over the past one to 11 years before diagnosis), the odds ratio for dementia was between 44% and 54%, with an average of 49%. Even between the different types of anticholinergics there were significant variations in risk. Among those with the highest exposure:

  • Anticholinergic antidepressants had an average adjusted odds ratio for dementia of 29%
  • Antiepileptic drugs had an average adjusted odds ratio of 39%
  • Antiparkinson drugs 52%
  • Bladder antimuscarinic drugs (prescribed for overactive bladder9) 65%
  • Antipsychotics 70%

Middle-aged individuals urged to minimize exposure

The strongest associations were seen in those diagnosed with dementia before the age of 80. The adjusted odds ratio for those in the highest exposure group who were diagnosed with dementia after the age of 80 was 35%, while the odds for those diagnosed before the age of 80 was a whopping 81%.10

No significant gender differences were found. Overall, vascular dementia was more common than Alzheimer’s disease, with odds for vascular dementia in the highest exposure group being 68% compared to 37% for Alzheimer’s.11 As noted by the authors:
“Exposure to several types of strong anticholinergic drugs is associated with an increased risk of dementia. These findings highlight the importance of reducing exposure to anticholinergic drugs in middle-aged and older people.”
“No significant increases in risk” for dementia were found for anticholinergic antihistamines, muscle relaxants, antispasmodics (prescribed for gastrointestinal problems), antiarrhythmics and antimuscarinic bronchodilators.12

 


Avoiding anticholinergics may improve cognition, says JAMA study

While the authors of the featured JAMA study point out it cannot prove causality, it’s not the first study to find this link. There are quite a few of them in the medical literature, which you can find by searching PubMed.gov, the free online library of medicine run by the U.S. National Institutes of Health.13

Among them you’ll find the 2009 paper,14 “The Cognitive Impact of Anticholinergics: A Clinical Review,” which analyzed the results of 27 studies in which “anticholinergic activity was systematically measured and correlated with standard measurements of cognitive performance.”

According to the authors, “All but two studies found an association between the anticholinergic activity of medications and either delirium, cognitive impairment or dementia,” which led to the conclusion that:
“Medications with anticholinergic activity negatively affect the cognitive performance of older adults. Recognizing the anticholinergic activity of certain medications may represent a potential tool to improve cognition.”

Some anticholinergics clearly worse than others

A case-control study15 published in 2018 in the BMJ — which like the featured JAMA study looked at the effects of various classes of anticholinergics — also found that antidepressant, urological and antiparkinson drugs posed the greatest risk. As noted by the authors:16
“It is well known that anticholinergics affect cognition, and guidelines suggest they are to be avoided among frail older people. Use of anticholinergic drugs among people with dementia is recognized as inappropriate by both the Beers and the Screening Tool of Older Persons’ potentially inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP) criteria.
Over the past decade, prolonged exposure to anticholinergic drugs has been linked to long term cognitive decline or dementia incidence among community living cohorts and nursing home residents.”
Here, the researchers included 40,770 patients newly diagnosed with dementia, and compared their outcomes with their use of anticholinergic drugs four to 20 years before their diagnosis.

Each patient was compared to as many as seven matched controls who did not have dementia. The median age at diagnosis was 83 and the median drug exposure period was 7.1 years.17 The study had three stated objectives:18

  1. Assessing the effect of chronic anticholinergic drug use on dementia incidence
  2. Exploring whether observed effects are restricted to any particular drug class. Drugs were divided into three groups based on the “anticholinergic cognitive burden (ACB) scale,”19 where a score of 3 means the drug has “definite anticholinergic activity” and is known to significantly raise the risk of cognitive impairment
  3. Testing how the risk might vary based on the amount of exposure to any given drug class and the timing of use

The primary analysis found “a positive and significant association” between anticholinergics and dementia, regardless of their ACB score. Those with an ACB score of 1 and 2 had an odds ratio of 10% and drugs with an ACB score of 3 had an odds ratio of 11%.

The primary difference between the ACB classes were the dose-response effect. Drugs with an ACB score of 2 or 3 had a clear dose-dependent response, whereas drugs with a score of 1 did not.20 As for objective 2, the researchers found:
“When analyzed by class, there was a significant association between dementia incidence and any prescription of antidepressant, antiparkinson, or urological drugs with an ACB score of 3, but no association with antispasmodic, antipsychotic, antihistamine, or other drugs with an ACB score of 3.
Prescriptions for drugs with an ACB score of 2 were relatively rare, and so results are imprecise in this group, but there is some evidence for an association between dementia incidence and prescription of antiparkinson drugs.
We found positive associations for antidepressant drugs with an ACB score of 1 with an increased risk of dementia, but not with any other drugs with an ACB score of 1.”
Lastly, the timing of the drug exposure was assessed, looking at three different sets of time intervals: four to 10 years, 10 to 15 years, and 15 to 20 years of use before dementia diagnosis. For drugs with an ACB score of 3, the risk was “consistent” across all three exposure periods, although the strongest association was seen for ACB 3-class drugs used for 15 to 20 years before diagnosis. For this group, the odds ratio for dementia was between 10% and 24%, with an average of 17%.

Antidepressants and urological drugs with an ACB score of 3 “remained consistently significantly associated with dementia incidence,” with antidepressants having an average odds ratio of 19% and urological drugs 27%.21 For drugs with ACB scores of 1 and 2, the risks became more apparent closer to the date of diagnosis. As noted by the authors:
“[F]or antidepressants with an ACB score of 1, the association with dementia increased for prescriptions given in periods closer to a diagnosis of dementia. Similarly, the negative association between gastrointestinal drugs and dementia was not seen for exposures 15-20 years before the index date.”

Behavioral changes can be an early sign of dementia

As you can see, even within a single class of drugs, in this case, drugs broadly classified as anticholinergics, you find all sorts of factors that can increase or decrease their risks to any given individual.

Overall, however, anticholinergics as a group are risky, and the risk of dementia increases the longer you’re on them. Even if the drug in question has a low ACB score, if you’re on it for decades, the risk of dementia creeps up. It would be wise for everyone to be on the lookout for early signs of dementia, but especially so if you’re on an anticholinergic drug.

Now, dementia is not a disease in itself; it’s a term used to describe a number of different brain illnesses that may affect your memory, thinking, behavior and ability to perform everyday activities. Many people associate dementia with memory loss — and this is a red flag — however, not all memory problems are due to dementia or Alzheimer’s.

As noted by the Alzheimer’s Association,22 some causes of dementia-like symptoms (including memory loss), such as those related to thyroid problems and vitamin deficiencies, are reversible with proper treatment.

Before memory and thinking problems become obvious, people with dementia will often display changes in mood and behavior. A person may, for instance, stop doing something they’ve always loved to do, be it cooking a certain dish for your birthday or watching the evening news.

Apathy is another common sign, although some people may display more blatant changes like suddenly becoming sexually promiscuous or developing the habit of snatching food from other people’s plates.23,24

At the 2016 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, a group of Alzheimer’s experts presented a 34-question checklist25 of signs of mild behavioral impairment (MBI), which they believe might help identify patients at high risk for Alzheimer’s.

Those with sudden mood or behavioral changes that persist tend to develop dementia at a faster rate.26,27 The MBI checklist was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease in 2017.28 You can find a copy of the questionnaire here.

Is it age-related forgetfulness or something more serious?

Aside from that, the Alzheimer’s Association has also compiled a list29 of early signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s, along with suggestions for how to determine whether you’re dealing with typical age-related changes or something more serious:

Signs of Alzheimer’s/dementia Typical age-related changes
Poor judgment and decision-making Making a bad decision once in a while
Inability to manage a budget Missing a monthly payment
Losing track of the date or the season Forgetting which day it is and remembering it later
Difficulty having a conversation Sometimes forgetting which word to use
Misplacing things and being unable to retrace steps to find them Losing things from time to time

As mentioned at the outset, Alzheimer’s is primarily diet- and lifestyle driven. In fact, it shares many risk factors with heart disease, including insulin resistance and diabetes. For a list of dietary strategies and general lifestyle guidelines that can help prevent Alzheimer’s, see “Link Between Sugar and Alzheimer’s Strengthens.”

To learn more about Alzheimer’s and the tests that can help diagnose it early, see my interview with Dr. Dale Bredesen, author of “The End of Alzheimer’s: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline.”

Sources and References
Posted by: | Posted on: July 6, 2019

14 Evidence-Based Medicinal Properties of Coconut Oil

© 2019 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here //www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.

While coconut oil has dragged itself out of the muck of vast misrepresentation over the past few years as a ‘deadly saturated fat,’ it still does not get the full appreciation it truly deserves.  Not just a “good” fat, coconut oil is an exceptional healing agent as well, with loads of useful health applications.

Some examples of this “good” saturated fat’s therapeutica properties include:

  • Fat-Burning: Ironic, isn’t it? A saturated fat which can accelerate the loss of midsection fat (the most dangerous kind). Well, there are now two solid, human studies showing just two tablespoons a day (30 ml), in both men and women, is capable of reducing belly fat within 1-3 months.
  • Brain-Boosting: A now famous study, published in 2006 in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, showed that the administration of medium chain triglycerides (most plentifully found in coconut oil) in 20 subjects with Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment, resulted in significant increases in ketone bodies (within only 90 minutes after treatment) associated with measurable cognitive improvement in those with less severe cognitive dysfunction.[i]
  • Clearing Head Lice: When combined with anise spray, coconut oil was found to be superior to the insecticide permethrin (.43%).[ii]
  • Healing Wounds: Coconut has been used for wound healing since time immemorial.  Three of the identified mechanisms behind these healing effects are its ability to accelerate re-epithelialization, improve antioxidant enzyme activity, and stimulate higher collagen cross-linking within the tissue being repaired.[iii]  Coconut oil has even been shown to work synergistically with traditional treatments, such as silver sulphadizine, to speed burn wound recovery.[iv]
  • NSAID Alternative: Coconut oil has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory, analgesic and fever-reducing properties.[v]
  • Anti-Ulcer Activity: Interestingly, coconut milk (which includes coconut oil components), has been shown to be as effective as the conventional drug sucralfate as an NSAID-associated anti-ulcer agent.[vi]
  • Anti-Fungal: In 2004, 52 isolates of Candida species were exposed to coconut oil. The most notorious form, Candida albicans, was found to have the highest susceptibility. Researchers remarked: “Coconut oil should be used in the treatment of fungal infections in view of emerging drug-resistant Candida species.”[vii]
  • Testosterone-Booster: Coconut oil was found to reduce oxidative stress in the testes of rats, resulting in significantly higher levels of testosterone.[viii]
  • Reducing Swollen Prostate: Coconut oil has been found to reduce testosterone-induced benign prostate growth in rats.[ix]
  • Improving Blood Lipids: Coconut oil consistently improves the LDL:HDL ratio in the blood of those who consume it.  Given this effect, coconut oil can nolonger be dismissed for being ‘that saturated fat which clogs the arteries.’
  • Fat-Soluble Nutrient Absorption: Coconut oil was recently found to be superior to safflower oil in enhancing tomato carotenoid absorption.[x]
  • Bone Health: Coconut oil has been shown to reduce oxidative stress within the bone, which may prevent structural damage in osteoporotic bone.[xi] [Note: Osteoporosis is a Myth, as presently defined by the T-Score]
  • Sunscreen: Coconut oil has been shown to block out UV rays by 30%. Keep in mind that this is good, insofar as UVA rays are damaging to the skin, whereas UVB rays are highly beneficial (when exposure is moderate).[i]  Make sure to check this list of other sun-blocking oils.
  • Insect Repellant: Amazingly, coconut oil was recently found to be more effective than DEET at repelling insects. Read our article on the topic here: Coconut Oil Beats Toxic DEET at Repelling Insects.

Of course, when speaking about coconut oil, we are only looking at one part of the amazing coconut palm.  Each component, including coconut hull fiber, coconut protein and coconut water has experimentally confirmed therapeutic applications.


References

  • [i] Mark A Reger, Samuel T Henderson, Cathy Hale, Brenna Cholerton, Laura D Baker, G S Watson, Karen Hyde, Darla Chapman, Suzanne Craft . Effects of beta-hydroxybutyrate on cognition in memory-impaired adults. Neurobiol Aging. 2004 Mar;25(3):311-4. PMID: 15123336
  • [iii] K G Nevin, T Rajamohan . Effect of topical application of virgin coconut oil on skin components and antioxidant status during dermal wound healing in young rats. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2010 ;23(6):290-7. Epub 2010 Jun 3. PMID: 20523108
  • [xi] Mouna Abdelrahman Abujazia, Norliza Muhammad, Ahmad Nazrun Shuid, Ima Nirwana Soelaiman. The Effects of Virgin Coconut Oil on Bone Oxidative Status in Ovariectomised Rat. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012 ;2012:525079. Epub 2012 Aug 15. PMID: 22927879

Originally published: 2012-09-03  updated: 2019-06-29

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.
Posted by: | Posted on: April 6, 2016

Welcome to LeanMachine

Use the Search box to find articles relating to your topic.

Or use the category selection (still in progress, many articles still uncategorised).

In 2010 at age 63, LeanMachine was obese at over 100kg (about 220 pounds), sick almost all of the time, hair almost completely grey, allergic to nearly everything, had continuous back pain, and had no energy.

One year later at age 64, LeanMachine was 25kg lighter and lean at 74kg (about 162 pounds), never sick, no colds or flu, not even a headache, hair restored to 90% colour, allergies disappeared, no more back pain, full of energy, and stronger than he was 50 years ago at the age of 24. How can this be? Mainly, just a few simple changes:

  • Quit sugar
  • Quit processed foods
  • Quit all fizzy drinks
  • Quit fried food
  • Increase exercise
  • Increase healthy fats
  • Increase raw foods (salads)
  • Decrease simple carbohydrates
  • Eliminate bread, flour, cakes, pastries, etc
  • Increase organic food intake

Now in 2019 at age 72, LeanMachine has not been sick in nearly 10 years. No colds, no flu, no nausea, no pain, not even a headache in almost 10 years.
Some health supplements have helped along the way – see some recommended supplements here: www.leanmachine.net.au/catalog/
Note: The shop is now closed and will no longer accept orders, but each product page has a link to the best supplier, and I try to keep product information up to date, however the TGA has forbidden me to make any statement such as “May help lower blood glucose” even though the product may have been used safely for three thousand years, and independent studies have proven the benefits. All such information has been removed from every product, sorry. This prevents the reader from making an informed decision, but that is the bureaucracy gone mad in Australia, obviously to protect the billions of dollars that the big drug companies make. I have asked the TGA for a report on the financial ties to the drug industry for all decision-makers in their organisation, but of course, no response. In the USA, the CDC (Centres for Disease Control) and the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) have almost all people in charge who have financial ties to the drug industry, and are actively trying to squash anyone, including LeanMachine, to promote healthy alternatives to expensive prescription drugs, vaccinations and medical procedures that do more harm than good.

Various articles on my Facebook page have disappeared because Facebook, in their profound knowledge of medical things, have decided that anything to do with vaccinations or natural therapies is a scam. No mention of the hundreds of thousands of people every year that are killed by correctly prescribed and correctly taken prescription medication. LeanMachine still has a Facebook page, but there have been no posts for a long time, and never will be unless Facebook, Google, Amazon, Microsoft and others start upholding the truth instead of pushing Big Pharma propaganda.

Free health articles at the article page: www.leanmachine.net.au
Most of these articles will be updated and transferred to this blog as time permits.

This blog now contains many health articles from LeanMachine and others renowned in the field of alternative medicine.
LeanMachine may not necessarily agree with all statements by others, but these articles are copyrighted by the original author, and are reproduced legally with no alterations.

To find an article, use the search box to display a list of all articles using your search term, or select a subject from the categories list.

Alternative Medicine
Note that “alternative medicine” should be called Real Medicine, which has a successful history of thousands of years, while “conventional medicine” which uses drugs to treat symptoms rather than prevent the cause, is sending Governments broke while lining the profits of the drug companies, whose intent is to make more people sick so they can sell more drugs. The USA is a prime example: In spite of the most expensive health care system on the planet, the population has the poorest health! Epidemics of Cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease, Alzheimer’s Disease, Autism and other diseases are increasing as the population uses more non-organic foods, fried foods, bad oils (margarine, canola oil, etc), vaccinations containing mercury, aluminium and other toxins that hurt the heart and brain.
In another one or two generations, we will see the terrible effects of conventional medicine that cause catastrophic damage to the human race.
Alternative medicine is a way of avoiding all of these things.

Disclaimer
LeanMachine cannot be responsible for the interpretation of any articles, regardless of the author, and everyone should seek qualified medical opinion before acting on any advice in any article here, especially if also taking prescription medication, which often uses the same biological pathway as some supplements, resulting in either a dangerous overdose or ineffective under-dose of prescription medication. Always inform your doctor if taking any supplement or specialised diet or any over-the-counter product.