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Can glutathione help combat fatty liver disease?

Reproduced from original article:
www.naturalhealth365.com/glutathione-liver-disease-3311.html

glutathione-detox(NaturalHealth365) Glutathione – a powerful antioxidant that’s found within every cell of the body – is made up of amino acids. This antioxidant contributes to a variety of important bodily functions, including vitamin regeneration, breaking down free radicals, immune system support, helping the liver to handle fats, making DNA, and even the creation of sperm cells.  But, unlike many other antioxidants, the body is actually able to make this substance in your liver.

Researchers have previously found links between certain diseases and low glutathione levels.  Since the antioxidant plays an important role in the antioxidant and detoxification systems of cells, scientists hypothesized that glutathione supplementation would help combat fatty liver disease.  And in a fairly recent study, researchers investigated oral supplementation in individuals with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with positive results.

The proper amount of glutathione proves to be beneficial for people with fatty liver disease

The study involved 34 patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, all of whom had been diagnosed via ultrasonography. First, patients underwent lifestyle interventions, such as diet and exercise changes for a period of three months.

Then, patients were treated with 300 mg per day of glutathione. Clinical parameters like liver fat, liver fibrosis, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT – a blood test that checks for liver damage) levels were all checked both before and after treatment with glutathione.

Among the patients who finished this protocol, a significant decrease in ALT levels were seen after treatment with glutathione.  Patients also so decreases in ferritin, triglyceride, and non-esterified fatty acid levels.

Overall, the study demonstrated that oral supplementation of glutathione does offer some significant potential therapeutic effects for patients with fatty liver disease, although study authors note that larger-scale clinical trials should be done for verification.

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Powerful antioxidant offers additional health benefits

Beyond this new study showing the benefits of glutathione for individuals with liver disease, the powerful antioxidant offers a number of additional health benefits as well.

Benefits include:

  • Counteracting free radicals: As an antioxidant, it helps fight free radicals, protecting your body from their damaging and aging effects.
  • Improves insulin sensitivity: One study showed that individuals who have insulin resistance often have low glutathione levels.
  • Combating cancer: Some research shows glutathione may help prevent cancer progression as well.
  • Alleviate symptoms of Parkinson’s: Research shows that maintaining healthy levels of glutathione may help alleviate or at least reduce symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease.
  • Boosting the immune system: By protecting cell mitochondria and reducing inflammation, glutathione helps boost the immune system.

Although glutathione offers a number of proven health benefits, as you grow older, levels of glutathione decrease.  Injury, stress, and illness can all affect glutathione stores, as well.

Therefore, eating an organic diet, reducing or eliminating smoking and alcohol consumption, and avoiding exposure to environmental toxins can help prevent glutathione depletion.  Naturally, adding a glutathione supplement to your diet in the amount of 200 – 500 mg per day may also prove helpful, although you should always talk to your integrative physician before making any changes to your diet or supplement routine.

Sources for this article include:

NIH.gov
NaturalHealth365.com
MedicalNewsToday.com

Canned soup: “Comfort foods” that threaten your health

Reproduced from original article:
www.naturalhealth365store.com/canned-soup-dangerous-health

Posted by Jonathan Landsman 25th January 2020

It looks like such a healthy idea . . . a can of tomato or chicken noodle soup. Plus, there are all those associations we have with being fed a steaming bowl of soup on a TV tray while we lie in bed recovering from a horrible cold.

But, that may not be always so true.

Now, first let me say there is good news. Some organic brands of canned soup like Amy’s Organics are absolutely delicious and are way less toxic than more commercial brands.  Imagine Food’s organic soups are also on the list of safe soups to consume, as well as other organic brands like Wolfgang Puck’s.

Of course, if you really want the “best” kind of soup … nothing beats homemade from scratch.  Having said that, I’ll give you a list of healthy canned soups that are delicious, nutritious, and safe at the end of this article.

But, first, what’s so bad about canned soup?

BPA is an endocrine disruptor that can cause hormone-based cancers

Study after study has confirmed that canned soup is loaded with bisphenol-A or BPA, for short. BPA is an endocrine disruptor that throws our hormones completely out of balance and can cause estrogen dominance, which can lead to the development of breast cancer, uterine and endometrial cancer, and prostate cancer.

BPA is also terrible for bone health

BPA blocks calcium channels, preventing calcium from making it into the bone, where you need it to give your bones strength and resilience to breakage. A recent article published in the International Journal of Medical Science found that BPA blocks calcium absorption at a cellular level.

Canned soup contains too much sodium, making it a threat to kidney health

Just one can of soup can contain as much as one third of your RDA for sodium! Light soups often have even more sodium added in the manufacturer’s efforts to give the soup more flavor.

Individuals with insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease who are trying to avoid sodium definitely want to avoid canned soup for this reason. Persons trying to stay in good health should steer clear of soups containing too much sodium as well.

Canned soup is loaded with MSG – a major cause of diabetes and insulin resistance

Scientists have now linked MSG with insulin resistance, obesity, and possibly type 2 diabetes. In fact, in China today, diabetes is becoming an epidemic, and scientists believe additives like MSG and adopting a chiefly Western diet full of fast food and processed foods could be largely to blame.

Safe brands of canned soup include:

  • Amy’s Organic Soups
  • Wolfgang Puck’s Organic Soup
  • Imagine Food’s Organic Soups
  • Pacific Food’s Organic and Organic Bone Broth Soups

Editor’s note: The NaturalHealth365 Store offers the finest quality (immune-supportive) supplements on the market.  Click here to shop today.

Sources for this article include:

NIH.gov

Saveourbones.com

Daily Aspirin — Healthy or Harmful?


Reproduced from original article:
https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/02/17/daily-aspirin.aspx

Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola     
daily aspirin

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Prophylactic aspirin use in adults over the age of 70 is potentially harmful, primarily due to the increased risk of bleeding in this age group. Long-term low-dose aspirin therapy nearly doubles your risk for gastrointestinal bleeding
  • In adults younger than 40, there is insufficient evidence to judge the risk-benefit ratio of routine aspirin for the primary prevention of heart disease
  • While daily aspirin is still recommended for people with heart disease to lower the risk of another heart attack or stroke, previous studies have cast doubt on the effectiveness of this approach as well
  • You may be able to achieve the same kind of cardiovascular protection by donating blood. The bleeding caused by aspirin may be part of why it lowers your risk of heart attack and stroke, as bleeding will lower your iron level. People taking seven aspirins per week have been shown to have 25% lower mean serum ferritin than nonusers
  • Other aspirin alternatives include nattokinase and lumbrokinase, both of which are potent thrombolytics, comparable to aspirin without the serious side effects. They break down blood clots and reduce the risk of serious clotting by dissolving excess fibrin, improving circulation and decreasing blood viscosity

In decades past, a daily low-dose aspirin regimen was frequently recommended as a primary prevention strategy against heart disease. However, the evidence in support of it was rather weak, and kept getting weaker as time went on.

I stopped recommending daily “baby aspirin” use for the prevention of heart disease over two decades ago, due to the growing evidence of harmful side effects.

The primary justification for a daily aspirin regimen has been that it inhibits prostaglandin production,1 thereby decreasing your blood’s ability to form dangerous clots. However, in more recent years, most public health authorities have reversed their stance on the practice of using aspirin for primary prevention.

‘Baby’ Aspirin No Longer Recommended as Primary Prevention

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reversed its position on daily low-dose aspirin as primary prevention for heart disease in 2014,2 citing clearly established side effects — including dangerous brain and stomach bleeding — and a lack of clear benefit for patients who have never had a heart attack, stroke or cardiovascular disease.

In 2019, the American Heart Association (AHA) and American College of Cardiology updated their clinical guidelines on the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease,3 spelling out many of the controversial findings on prophylactic aspirin use.

Importantly, studies have found that prophylactic aspirin use in adults over the age of 70 is potentially harmful, primarily due to the increased risk of bleeding in this age group. As noted in one 2009 paper,4 long-term low-dose aspirin therapy nearly doubles your risk for gastrointestinal bleeding.

Older people are, of course, more likely to be at high risk for heart disease, and thus more likely to be put on aspirin therapy. In younger adults, the risks are less clear-cut.

As noted in the AHA guideline, in adults younger than 40, “there is insufficient evidence to judge the risk-benefit ratio of routine aspirin for the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.”5

That said, the conventional recommendation to avoid a daily aspirin regimen only applies to primary prevention of heart disease in those with no history of heart problems, or those with low or moderate risk for heart disease. As reported by the AHA:6

“The new recommendation doesn’t apply to people who already have had a stroke or heart attack, or who have undergone bypass surgery or a procedure to insert a stent in their coronary arteries.

These individuals already have cardiovascular disease and should continue to take low-dose aspirin daily, or as recommended by their health care provider, to prevent another occurrence …”

Is Aspirin Regimen Safe for Heart Disease Patients?

While daily low-dose aspirin continues to be recommended for patients who already have heart disease, there’s evidence suggesting it may not be an ideal solution for them either.

For example, the WASH (warfarin/aspirin study in heart failure) study7 published in 2004 — which assessed the risks and benefits of aspirin and the blood thinner warfarin in heart failure patients — found those who received aspirin treatment (300 mg/day) actually had the worst cardiac outcomes, including worsening heart failure. According to the authors, there was “no evidence that aspirin is effective or safe in patients with heart failure.”

Similarly, a 2010 study8 found older heart disease patients who had a prior history of aspirin use had more comorbidities and a higher risk of recurrent heart attack than those who had not been on aspirin therapy.

Aspirin has also not been proven safe or effective for diabetics, who are at increased risk for heart disease and therefore likely to be put on an aspirin regimen.

For example, a 2009 meta-analysis9 of six studies found no clear evidence that aspirin is effective in preventing cardiovascular events in people with diabetes, although men may derive some benefit.

Another 2009 study10 that examined the effects of aspirin therapy in diabetic patients found it “significantly increased mortality in diabetic patients without cardiovascular disease from 17% at age 50 years to 29% at age 85 years.”

On the other hand, it did lower mortality in elderly diabetic patients who also had cardiovascular disease. A meta-analysis11 published in 2010 also concluded aspirin did not reduce the heart attack risk in diabetic individuals.

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Why Phlebotomy May Be a Better Option Than Aspirin Therapy

While the benefits of low-dose aspirin may outweigh the risks for some people, I believe you may be able to achieve similar cardiovascular protection by doing therapeutic phlebotomies.

There’s evidence to suggest that the bleeding caused by aspirin may in fact be part of why it lowers your risk of heart attack and stroke, as bleeding will lower your iron level. Aspirin’s ability to lower inflammation may be another factor at play.

As shown in a 2001 study,12 people taking seven aspirins per week had 25% lower mean serum ferritin than nonusers. The effect was most marked in diseased subjects, compared to healthy ones. As explained by the authors:

“Atherosclerosis, a primary cause of myocardial infarction (MI), is an inflammatory disease. Aspirin use lowers risk of MI, probably through antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects.

Because serum ferritin (SF) can be elevated spuriously by inflammation, reported associations between elevated SF, used as an indicator of iron stores, and heart disease could be confounded by occult inflammation and aspirin use if they affect SF independently of iron status …

Aspirin use is associated with lower SF. We suggest this effect results from possible increased occult blood loss and a cytokine-mediated effect on SF in subjects with inflammation, infection, or liver disease.”

Most people, physicians included, fail to appreciate that — aside from blood loss, including menstruation — the body has no significant way to excrete excess iron. There are very minor amounts lost through normal bodily processes, but not enough to move the needle on overall iron levels.

Between supplementation, fortification and the iron that occurs naturally in foods, it’s very easy to end up with excessive levels. In fact, most adult men and postmenopausal women are at risk for excess iron and need regular blood testing for ferritin.

Excessive iron causes significant oxidative stress, catalyzing the formation of excessive free radicals that damage your cellular and mitochondrial membranes, proteins and DNA. It is a potent contributor to increased risks of cancers, heart disease and neurodegenerative diseases. You can learn more about the ins and outs of excess iron in “Why Managing Your Iron Level Is Crucial to Your Health.”

While dangerous, iron overload is easy and inexpensive to treat. All you really need to do is monitor your serum ferritin and/or gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) levels, avoid iron supplements, and be sure to donate blood on a regular basis.

By doing this, you can avoid serious health problems, and donating blood is a far safer way to lower your iron stores than taking aspirin and losing blood via internal bleeding.

Aspirin Linked to Lower Risk of Death

Interestingly, a 2019 study13 found prophylactic aspirin use may lower the risk of all-cause cancer, gastrointestinal (GI) cancer and colorectal cancer mortality among older adults.

The study included 146,152 individuals with a mean age of 66.3 years who participated in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. The median follow-up time was 12.5 years. Those taking aspirin at least three times a week had a:

  • 19% lower risk of death from all causes
  • 15% lower risk of death from any cancer
  • 25% lower risk of death from GI cancer
  • 29% lower risk of death from colorectal cancer

Having a higher body mass index (BMI between 25 and 29.9) lowered these percentages by 1%, with the exception of colorectal cancer. In this group, colorectal cancer death decreased by 34%.

No observable benefit of aspirin use was found in underweight individuals (BMI below 20), which led the researchers to hypothesize that “the efficacy of aspirin as a cancer preventive agent may be associated with BMI,”14 although this theory needs to be confirmed in future studies. The authors also warn that prophylactic aspirin therapy for cancer prevention would need to be weighed against the increased risk of bleeding.

Other Health Risks Associated With Long-Term Aspirin Use

Overall, there’s a lot of evidence against long-term daily aspirin therapy. The risk of internal bleeding is one significant concern, which is further magnified if you’re taking antidepressants or blood thinning medications such as Plavix.

Using aspirin in combination with SSRI antidepressants has been shown to increase your risk of abnormal bleeding by 42%, compared to those taking aspirin alone,15 and taking aspirin (325 mg/day) with Plavix has been shown to nearly double your risk of major hemorrhage and significantly increase your risk of death, while not affecting your risk of recurrent stroke to any significant degree.16

Aside from damaging your gastrointestinal tract,17,18 routine aspirin use has also been linked to an increased risk for cataracts,19 neovascular (wet) macular degeneration,20 tinnitus21 and hearing loss in men.22

Nattokinase Reduces Clot Formation Without Side Effects

Aside from donating blood to lower your iron level (provided it’s elevated), nattokinase is another far safer alternative to a daily aspirin regimen. Nattokinase, produced by the bacteria Bacillus subtilis during the fermentation of soybeans to produce natto,23 is a strong thrombolytic,24 comparable to aspirin without the serious side effects.

It’s been shown to break down blood clots and reduce the risk of serious clotting25 by dissolving excess fibrin in your blood vessels,26 improving circulation and decreasing blood viscosity. These effects can also help reduce high blood pressure.27

As noted in a 2018 paper,28 nattokinase appears to be a promising alternative in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, and has been linked to a reduction in cardiovascular disease mortality.

Lumbrokinase Is Even Better Than Nattokinase

Yet another alternative is lumbrokinase, a complex fibrinolytic enzyme extracted from earthworms. Like nattokinase, lumbrokinase boosts circulatory health by reducing blood viscosity, reducing blood clotting factor activity and degrading fibrin, which is a key factor in clot formation.29,30

Some researchers have suggested lumbrokinase could be used “as secondary prevention after acute thrombosis,” such as heart attacks and stroke.31 A 2008 study32 that explored “the mechanisms involved in the anti-ischemic action of lumbrokinase (LK) in the brain,” found it protected against cerebral ischemia via several mechanisms and pathways. As explained by the authors:

“These data indicated that the anti-ischemic activity of LK was due to its anti-platelet activity by elevating cAMP level and attenuating the calcium release from calcium stores, the anti-thrombosis action due to inhibiting of ICAM-1 expression, and the anti-apoptotic effect due to the activation of JAK1/STAT1 pathway.”

A 2009 pilot study33 that used lumbrokinase in patients with coronary artery disease and stable angina found it improved angina symptoms in 40% of patients and lowered the summed stress score by 29% (the summed stress score is a risk indicator for a cardiac event over the next 12 months34). According to the authors, “Oral lumbrokinase improves regional myocardial perfusion in patients with stable angina.”

Boosting Mitochondrial Biogenesis With Ginger

© 18th January 2020 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter
Reproduced from original article:
www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/boosting-mitochondrial-biogenesis-ginger

Posted on: January 18th 2020 at 4:00 pm
Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

3 superfood greens that are more nutritious than kale

Reproduced from original article:
https://www.naturalhealth365store.com/3-superfood-greens-healthier-kale
Posted by Jonathan Landsman on 24th January 2020

For a long time now, we’ve all thought kale was the super food in terms of nutrient density – and it wasn’t that easy for a lot of us to make it past that bitter taste, unfortunately.

But did you know that kale actually ranks 15th in terms of nutrient density in a study recently published by the CDC titled Defining Powerhouse Fruits and Vegetables (PFV): A Nutrient Density Approach?  You can find a link to that report below, so that you can read all about the 41 fruits and vegetables that the CDC found to be nutrient powerhouses.

Let’s look at the top 3 “super food” greens that rank higher than kale.

Watercress (nutrient density score of 100) 

 Watercress might look like a more delicate smallish leaves, but watercress is actually a relative of horseradish and mustard greens and it tastes very peppery, indeed.

 Watercress is a member of the cruciferous vegetable family, alongside nutritious vegetables like Brussel’s sprouts, kale, arugula, and broccoli. Plus, it’s packed with so much nutrition it might just qualify as the super food of the decade.

Ranking at 100 in terms of nutrient-density, just one cup of watercress gives you 106% of your vitamin K requirement, and around a fourth of your RDA for vitamins A and C.

Watercress is also a great source of fiber, potassium, protein, calcium, and magnesium and it’s jam-packed with antioxidants and phytonutrients that can protect you against oxidative damage in the form of free radicals, which are associated with aging, cancer, and many other debilitating diseases like Alzhiemer’s.

Scientists have also found that eating watercress daily can reduce DNA damage to blood cells, which is considered to be the hallmark event that triggers the development of cancer. The same study revealed that eating watercress daily improved blood levels of lutein (by 100%) and beta-carotene (by 33%) – 2 phytonutrients which are very protective of the eyes, preventing macular degeneration and cataracts.

 Try adding watercress to your salads, pairing it with mild but equally nutritious greens like green leaf lettuce or Bibb lettuce!

Chinese or Napa cabbage (nutrient density score of 91.99)

Napa cabbage is another cruciferous vegetable that is jam-packed with nutrition. Napa cabbage provides 85% of your RDA for vitamin K and over half your RDA for vitamin C.

It’s also rich in nutrients like folate, hard-to-get manganese, and vitamin B6 as well. Cabbage was voted one of two vegetables which can help prevent diabetes (the other being root vegetables). Being a cruciferous vegetable, it’s also proven to help reduce blood markers for inflammation.

Like watercress, Chinese or Napa cabbage is packed with antioxidants and phytonutrients and is currently being researched for its cancer-fighting benefits. One study of Chinese women found that consumption of brassica vegetables like Chinese cabbage helped to significantly reduce breast cancer risk.

Swiss chard (nutrient density score of 89.27) 

 A nutrient-dense powerhouse, Swiss chard contains 44% of your RDA for vitamin A, 18% of your RDA or vitamin C, and a whopping 374% of your RDA for vitamin K.

Swiss chard is loaded with antioxidants and phytonutrients, including a potent flavonoid called syringic acid, which aids the liver in detoxifying the body, and which helps lower liver enzymes and prevent liver degeneration as well.

Swiss chard is also rich in powerful antioxidants called betalains, which have powerful antioxidant and detoxification properties by supporting the phase II pathways of the liver.

Because it’s so packed with vitamin K, yielding over 3 times your RDA for this nutrient, Swiss chard can help lower blood cytokines, which raise your risk for inflammation and inflammation-based diseases, especially type 2 diabetes.

Editor’s note: The NaturalHealth365 Store offers the finest quality nutritional supplements to support a healthy lifestyle.  Click here to shop today!

Sources for this article include:

CDC.gov

NIH.gov

NIH.gov

NIH.gov

NIH.gov

NIH.gov

Coconut Oil Improves Brain Function in Alzheimer’s Patients

© 11th January 2020 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter

Reproduced from original article:
www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/coconut-oil-improves-brain-function-alzheimer-s-patients

Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating degenerative brain condition that affects millions of people in the U.S. While pharmaceutical treatments have long lists of side effects, there is a natural food-based intervention that has proven effective in improving key brain functions. The best part is, it’s probably in your food pantry right now

If you’re a regular reader of GreenMedInfo.com, you’re likely to have seen numerous articles detailing the dozens of healthy uses for coconut oil that are backed by science. From balancing blood sugar[i] and hormones[ii] to healing burns[iii] and ulcers,[iv] it seems there is hardly an ailment that is not soothed or supported by adding this nutrition-dense fat to your diet.

Coconut Oil: The Brain’s Preferred Fuel?

In 2018, researchers added to the knowledge base with confirmation of coconut oil’s usefulness as a brain-boosting superfood. The pilot study,[v] published in July 2018 in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, has shown that a Mediterranean diet, rich in coconut oil, improves the main cognitive functions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Conducted by a multidisciplinary team of researchers from the Catholic University of Valencia, Spain, the aim of the study was to detect changes in key cognitive functions of patients with AD after following a traditional Mediterranean diet boosted by therapeutic doses of coconut oil.

Study methods were prospective, longitudinal, qualitative and analytic, meaning participants’ health and behaviors were studied across time to observe unknown and unpredicted changes in outcomes. Inclusion criteria were diagnosed AD patients, aged 65 to 85 years old, who were institutionalized in the Alzheimer’s Family Association of Valencia (AFAV).

A representative sample size of 44 participants was ultimately selected from the original pool of 458 AFAV patients, with criteria excluding patients who were diagnosed with other types of degenerative cognitive disorder or verbal disability that prevented them from answering test questions, and excluding patients with any metabolic chronic disease or who had been treated with drugs such as antidepressants, antipsychotics or hypnotic drugs, which could alter cognitive functions.

The 44 participants were randomly divided into two homogenous groups comprised of 22 patients each: an experimental group receiving coconut oil supplementation and a control group that did not receive coconut oil. Both groups followed an isocaloric Mediterranean diet that was shown in previous studies to be associated with a decrease in cognitive impairment in AD patients.

In the Mediterranean diet implemented in this study, proteins accounted for 15% of total calories, carbohydrates for 55% and lipids for 30% of overall energy intake. Calorie intake was the same for all participants, taking into account that in the experimental group, lipids were reduced so that by adding the coconut oil supplement, the daily lipid amount for all study participants was the same. The dietary intervention was conducted over a period of 21 days.

Cognitive changes in participants were measured by the same institutional psychologist, blind to study protocols, who conducted the “7-Minute Screen,” an assessment that measures “temporal orientation, visuospatial and visuoconstructive abilities.” Visuoconstructive disabilities are represented by difficulty doing math, driving and writing, among other common daily tasks. Patients were assessed the day before dietary therapy and the day after therapy throughout the 21-day intervention.

Alzheimer’s: Most Prevalent Brain Disorder

According to researchers, “Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder, and new therapies are needed.” This study was a method of proving their hypothesis that coconut oil can be a beneficial source of ketone bodies, an alternative brain fuel to glucose for AD patients whose hypometabolism, or poor glucose utilization, is a factor in their disease.

In addition to serving as a fuel source for brain metabolism, ketone bodies, in adequate doses, regulate glutamate release in the synaptic cleft, the space between neurons that transmits impulses.[vi] Glutamate is a neurotransmitter that is involved in most aspects of normal brain function.[vii]

Researchers stated that gender is a significant factor in AD, with women more commonly affected than men.

The trial groups had 75% female and 25% male patients, reflecting the same percentages of gender distribution as the disease itself.[viii] In the published paper, the scientists noted the insidious onset of Alzheimer’s disease, which initially becomes apparent through “progressive loss of episodic memory, followed by gradual impairment of declarative and non-declarative memory.

Later, loss of other main cognitive functions, such as language, executive functions, attention span, and working memory, have also been observed as well as alterations in temporal orientation, visuospatial ability, and visuoconstructive ability.”[ix]

After a baseline assessment of all participants using the 7-Minute Screen, dosing commenced consisting of 20 milliliters (mls) of coconut oil, twice daily, for a total daily dose of 40 mls. This amount of coconut oil had previously demonstrated effectiveness at improving cognitive functions over 21 days in human[x] and mice studies.[xi]

Coconut Oil Improves Information Processing and Memory in AD Patients

Results were both confirming of the researchers’ hypothesis regarding the benefits of coconut oil and encouraging for proponents of natural disease interventions:

“Taking a closer look at the changes observed in the group that received coconut oil, these changes seem to point to the fact that certain cognitive functions improved … such as temporal orientation (information processing), semantic memory and episodic memory …

[These improvements] … could be explained by the decrease in insulin resistance due to the action of ketone bodies, since memory improvement has been observed after intranasal administration of insulin in AD patients, which increases glucose metabolism.”[xii]

An important observation was made regarding the potential for brain recovery with coconut oil: “It could be deduced that not all regions of the cerebral cortex recover to the same degree.”[xiii] Regarding gender differences, researchers observed that “female patients recover more easily than male patients, which confirms our previous results, where a global cognitive improvement was shown in women.”[xiv]

They hypothesize that these results could possibly be explained by hormonal differences in sex, “but not only with respect to low estrogen levels but also … by testosterone, whose levels of production are much lower in women with AD and cause them to have higher insulin resistance.”[xv] Researchers concluded that the positive effects of coconut oil are not gender- or state-specific, however, the benefits are “more evident in women with mild-moderate state [AD].”

Final conclusions of the study were that an isocaloric, coconut oil-enriched Mediterranean diet improves cognitive functions in patients with AD, with differences according to patient sex and degree of severity of the disease.[xvi] They issued a call for further studies of this type to add to this important body of evidence.

To learn more about the health benefits of coconut oil, GreenMedInfo.com has more than 70 abstracts in the world’s most widely referenced natural health database.


References

[i] Protective and Antidiabetic Effects of Virgin Coconut Oil (Vco) on Blood Glucose Concentrations in Alloxan Induced Diabetic Rats. Nur‘azimatul Quddsyiah H. Maidin, Norhayati Ahmad. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Vol 7, Issue 10, 2015. ISSN: 0975-1491. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/62d6/b586d89f623b4be84ac93c828b31f1070b76.pdf

[ii] Effect of dietary saturated fatty acids on hormone-sensitive lipolysis in rat adipocytes. Awad AB, Chattopadhyay JP. J Nutr. 1986 Jun;116(6):1088-94. PMID: 3014093

[iii] Burn wound healing property of Cocos nucifera: An appraisal. Srivastava P, Durgaprasad S. Indian J Pharmacol. 2008 Aug;40(4):144-6. doi: 10.4103/0253-7613.43159. PMID: 20040946

[iv] Antiulcerogenic effects of coconut (Cocos nucifera) extract in rats. Nneli RO, Woyike OA. Phytother Res. 2008 Jul;22(7):970-2. doi: 10.1002/ptr.2318. PMID: 18521965

[v] Improvement of Main Cognitive Functions in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease after Treatment with Coconut Oil Enriched Mediterranean Diet: A Pilot Study.  de la Rubia Ortí JE, et al. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;65(2):577-587. doi: 10.3233/JAD-180184. PMID: 30056419

[vi] Mirriam-Webster, Medical, Synaptic-cleft, https://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/synaptic%20cleft

[vii] Improvement of Main Cognitive Functions in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease after Treatment with Coconut Oil Enriched Mediterranean Diet: A Pilot Study.  de la Rubia Ortí JE, et al. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;65(2):577-587. doi: 10.3233/JAD-180184. PMID: 30056419

[viii] Improvement of Main Cognitive Functions in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease after Treatment with Coconut Oil Enriched Mediterranean Diet: A Pilot Study.  de la Rubia Ortí JE, et al. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;65(2):577-587. doi: 10.3233/JAD-180184. PMID: 30056419

[ix] Lazarov O, Hollands C. Hippocampal neurogenesis: Learning to remember. Prog Neurobiol. 2016;138-140:1–18. doi:10.1016/j.pneurobio.2015.12.006. PMID: 26855369

[x] Farah BA (2014) Effects of caprylic triglyceride on cognitive performance and cerebral glucose metabolism in mild Alzheimer’s disease: A single-case observation. Front Aging Neurosci 16, 1-4. PMID: 25076901

[xi] Reger MA, Henderson ST, Hale C, Cholerton B, Baker LD, Watson GS, Hyde K, Chapman D, Craft S (2004) Effects of beta-hydroxybutyrate on cognition in memory-impaired adults. Neurobiol Aging 25, 311-314. PMID: 15123336

[xii] How does coconut oil affect cognitive performance in alzheimer patients?  de la Rubia Ortí JE, et al. Nutr Hosp. 2017 Mar 30;34(2):352-356. doi: 10.20960/nh.780. PMID: 28421789

[xiii] Improvement of Main Cognitive Functions in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease after Treatment with Coconut Oil Enriched Mediterranean Diet: A Pilot Study.  de la Rubia Ortí JE, et al. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;65(2):577-587. doi: 10.3233/JAD-180184. PMID: 30056419

[xiv] Improvement of Main Cognitive Functions in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease after Treatment with Coconut Oil Enriched Mediterranean Diet: A Pilot Study.  de la Rubia Ortí JE, et al. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;65(2):577-587. doi: 10.3233/JAD-180184. PMID: 30056419

[xv] Improvement of Main Cognitive Functions in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease after Treatment with Coconut Oil Enriched Mediterranean Diet: A Pilot Study.  de la Rubia Ortí JE, et al. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;65(2):577-587. doi: 10.3233/JAD-180184. PMID: 30056419

[xvi] Improvement of Main Cognitive Functions in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease after Treatment with Coconut Oil Enriched Mediterranean Diet: A Pilot Study.  de la Rubia Ortí JE, et al. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;65(2):577-587. doi: 10.3233/JAD-180184. PMID: 30056419

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

More Health Benefits of Quercetin Revealed


Reproduced from original article:
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Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola     Fact Checked image

January 27, 2020
quercetin benefits

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Quercetin has been shown to combat inflammation and acts as a natural antihistamine. Several studies have highlighted quercetin’s ability to prevent and treat both the common cold and influenza
  • Another, less known benefit and use for quercetin includes the prevention and/or treatment of high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, certain cancers, gout, arthritis and mood disorders
  • A review of quercetin’s effect on metabolic syndrome found it significantly reduced fasting plasma glucose when taken for at least eight weeks at a dosage of 500 milligrams per day or more
  • Other recent research found quercetin has a beneficial impact on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by ameliorating inflammation, oxidative stress and lipid metabolism
  • Quercetin also has the ability to trigger tumor regression by interacting with your DNA and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis (the programmed cell death of damaged cells)

Quercetin1 is an antioxidant flavonol found naturally in foods such as apples, plums, red grapes, green tea, elder flower and onions, just to name a few.2 According to a 2019 Market Watch report,3 the quercetin market is growing rapidly as its health benefits are becoming more widely known.

Quercetin has been shown to combat inflammation and acts as a natural antihistamine. In fact, its antiviral capacity appears to be the primary focus of many studies looking at quercetin’s benefits, and a number of studies have highlighted quercetin’s ability to prevent and treat both the common cold and influenza.4,5,6,7

But there are also other, less known benefits and uses for this supplement, including the prevention and/or treatment of:8

High blood pressure9 Cardiovascular disease10
Metabolic syndrome11 Certain kinds of cancer12
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)13 Gout14
Arthritis15 Mood disorders16
Longevity, thanks to its senolytic benefits (clearing out damaged and worn-out cells)17,18

Additionally, quercetin is also helpful for aluminum-induced neurodegenerative changes, such as those seen in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As noted in a 2016 study:19

“Administration of quercetin (10 mg/kg body wt/day) reduced aluminum (10 mg/kg body wt/day)-induced oxidative stress (decreased ROS production, increased mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity).

In addition, quercetin also prevents aluminum-induced translocation of cyt-c, and up-regulates Bcl-2, down-regulates Bax, p53, caspase-3 activation and reduces DNA fragmentation …

Further electron microscopic studies revealed that quercetin attenuates aluminum-induced mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae and chromatin condensation. These results indicate that treatment with quercetin may represent a therapeutic strategy to attenuate the neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration.”

Quercetin Improves Metabolic Syndrome Traits

Among the most recent papers on this powerful antioxidant is a review20 published in the March 2019 issue of Phytotherapy Research, which looked at nine randomized controlled trials investigating quercetin’s effect on metabolic syndrome.

Metabolic syndrome refers to a cluster of conditions (including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels and fat accumulation around the waist) that raise your risk for Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

While pooled findings found no effect on fasting plasma glucose, insulin resistance or hemoglobin A1c levels, further subgroup analyses revealed quercetin supplementation “significantly reduced” fasting plasma glucose in studies lasting at least eight weeks and in which dosages of at least 500 milligrams (mg) per day were used.

In studies that included people over the age of 45, “significant” reductions in insulin were also found when using a dosage of 500 mg per day or more. An earlier study,21 published in 2011, looked at quercetin’s effects on certain traits of metabolic syndrome.

This study focused specifically atherosclerosis and inflammation in men with the APOE genotype 3/3, 3/4 and 4/4, and found quercetin significantly decreased waist circumference, postprandial systolic blood pressure, postprandial triacylglycerol, and increased HDL-cholesterol compared to placebo. Here, participants were given 150 mg of quercetin per day for eight weeks.

Research22 on obese rats published in 2008 also found that quercetin supplementation at doses of 2 mg per kilo or 10 mg/kg of body weight for 10 weeks improved systolic blood pressure, triglyceride, total cholesterol and free fatty acid levels. The 10 mg/kg dose also improved the animals’ inflammation status. As noted by the authors:

“In conclusion, both doses of quercetin improved dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperinsulinemia in obese Zucker rats, but only the high dose produced antiinflammatory effects in VAT together with a reduction in body weight gain.”

One of the first studies23 to demonstrate quercetin’s beneficial effects on blood pressure was published in 2007. As reported by the authors:

“Epidemiological studies report that quercetin … is associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease and stroke … Men and women with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to test the efficacy of 730 mg quercetin/d for 28 d[ays] vs. placebo.

Blood pressure at enrollment was … 148 +/- 2/96 +/- 1 in stage 1 hypertensive subjects … Reductions in systolic (-7 +/- 2 mm Hg), diastolic (-5 +/- 2 mm Hg), and mean arterial pressures (-5 +/- 2 mm Hg) were observed in stage 1 hypertensive patients after quercetin treatment … These data are the first to our knowledge to show that quercetin supplementation reduces blood pressure in hypertensive subjects.”

Similarly, a January 2020 systematic review24 of 17 studies concluded quercetin “significantly decreased” blood pressure in human subjects. Those who took it for eight weeks or more also had “significantly” improved high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides.

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Quercetin Improves Diabetes-Induced NAFLD

Other recent research25 published in the August 2019 issue of Phytotherapy Research concluded quercetin has a beneficial impact on NAFLD “by ameliorating inflammation, oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.”

Diabetes can play a role in NAFLD as well, showing just how influential insulin resistance is in the development of chronic diseases of all kinds. As explained in the abstract:

“Multiphase pathological processes involve in Type 2 diabetes (T2DM)‐induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the therapies are quite limited. In the present study, the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of quercetin in T2DM‐induced NAFLD were investigated …

The results revealed that quercetin alleviated serum transaminase levels and markedly reduced T2DM‐induced histological alterations of livers. Additionally, quercetin restored superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione content in livers.

Not only that, quercetin markedly attenuated T2DM‐induced production of interleukin 1 beta, interleukin 6, and TNF‐α. Accompanied by the restoration of the increased serum total bile acid and the decreased liver total bile acid, quercetin could reduce lipid accumulation in the liver … These findings suggested that quercetin might be a potentially effective drug for the treatment of T2DM‐induced NAFLD.”

Quercetin Helps Modulate Gene Expression

According to research26 published in 2016, quercetin even has the ability to trigger tumor regression by interacting with your DNA and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis (the programmed cell death of damaged cells).

Quercetin was found to induce cytotoxicity in leukemic cells, and the effect was dose-dependent. Limited cytotoxic effects were also found in breast cancer cells. Overall, quercetin increased the life span in cancer-ridden mice fivefold compared to untreated controls.

The authors attributed these effects to quercetin’s direct interaction with DNA and its activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, and suggested quercetin’s potential use as a cancer therapy adjunct deserves further exploration.

More recent research27 in the journal Molecules also highlights quercetin’s epigenetic influence and ability to:

  • Interact with cell-signaling pathways
  • Modulate gene expression
  • Influence the activity of transcription factors
  • Modulate microRNAs

MicroRNAs used to be considered “junk” DNA. Far from being useless, research has now revealed that “junk” DNA is actually microRNA and plays a crucial role in regulating genes that make the proteins that build your body.

The microRNA function as “on/off” switches for the genes. Depending on the microRNA input, a single gene can code for any of more than 200 protein products. Quercetin’s ability to module microRNA may also help explain its cytotoxic effects, and why it appears to improve cancer survival (at least in mice).

Quercetin Is a Powerful Antiviral

As mentioned, one of the most well-studied attributes of quercetin is its antiviral capacity, which have been attributed to three main mechanisms of action:

  1. Inhibiting the virus’ ability to infect cells
  2. Inhibiting replication of already infected cells
  3. Reducing infected cells’ resistance to treatment with antiviral medication

For example, research28 funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, published in 2007, found it lowers your risk of viral illness and boosts mental performance following extreme physical stress, which might otherwise undermine your immune function and render you more susceptible to infections.

Here, cyclists who received a daily dose of 1,000 mg of quercetin in combination with vitamin C (which enhances plasma quercetin levels29,30) and niacin (to improve absorption) for five weeks were significantly less likely to contract a viral illness after bicycling three hours a day for three consecutive days, compared to untreated controls. While 45% of the placebo group got sick, only 5% of the treatment group did.

In another study31 funded by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), published in 2008, animals treated with quercetin were challenged with a highly pathogenic H1N1 influenza virus. Again, the treatment group had significantly lower morbidity and mortality than the placebo group. A number of other studies have also confirmed quercetin’s effectiveness against a variety of viruses, including the following:

A 1985 study found quercetin inhibits infectivity and replication of herpes simplex virus type 1, polio-virus type 1, parainfluenza virus type 3 and respiratory syncytial virus.32
A 2010 animal study found that quercetin inhibits both influenza A and B viruses. Two other important discoveries were made. Firstly, the viruses were unable to develop resistance to quercetin, and secondly, when used concomitant with antiviral drugs (amantadine or oseltamivir), the effect was significantly amplified — and it prevented drug-resistance from developing.33
A 2004 animal study investigating quercetin’s effect on influenza used a strain of the H3N2 virus. According to the authors:34

“During influenza virus infection, there is ‘oxidative stress.’ Because quercetin restored the concentrations of many antioxidants, it is proposed that it may be useful as a drug in protecting the lung from the deleterious effects of oxygen derived free radicals released during influenza virus infection.”

Another 2016 study found quercetin offered protection against influenza A virus H1N1 by modulating protein expression. More specifically, the regulation of heat shock proteins, fibronectin 1 and prohibitin was instrumental in reducing viral replication.35
A third study published in 2016 found quercetin inhibited a wide spectrum of influenza strains, including H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1. According to the authors, “This study indicates that quercetin showing inhibitory activity in the early stage of influenza infection provides a future therapeutic option to develop effective, safe and affordable natural products for the treatment and prophylaxis of [influenza A viruses] infections.”36
In 2014, researchers noted that quercetin appears to be “a promising treatment for the common cold,” caused by the rhinovirus, adding that “Quercetin has been shown to reduce viral internalization and replication in vitro, and viral load, lung inflammation and airways hyper-responsiveness in vivo.”37

By attenuating oxidative damage, it also lowers your risk of secondary bacterial infections, which is actually the primary cause of influenza-related deaths. Importantly, quercetin increases mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle, which suggests part of its antiviral effects are due to enhanced mitochondrial antiviral signaling.

A 2016 animal study38 found quercetin inhibited mouse dengue virus and hepatitis virus. Other studies have confirmed quercetin’s power to inhibit both hepatitis B39 and C40 infection.
Most recently, a March 2020 study41 in the Microbial Pathogenesis journal found quercetin “provides comprehensive protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection,” both in vitro and in vivo, primarily by neutralizing pneumolysin (PLY),42 one of the toxins released from pneumococci that encourages S. pneumoniae infection to blossom in the first place. As reported by the authors in Microbial Pathogenesis:

“The results indicated that quercetin significantly reduced PLY-induced hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity via repressing the formation of oligomers.

In addition, treatment with quercetin can reduce PLY-mediated cell injury, improve the survival rate of mice infected with a lethal dose of S. pneumoniae, alleviate the pathological damage of lung tissue and inhibit the release of cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

Considering the importance of these events in antimicrobial resistant S. pneumoniae pathogenesis, our results indicated that quercetin may be a novel potential drug candidate for the treatment of clinical pneumococcal infections.”

Quercetin Combats Inflammation and Boosts Immunity

Aside from its antiviral activity, quercetin is also known for boosting immunity and combating inflammation. As noted in a 2016 study43 in the journal Nutrients, mechanisms of action include (but is not limited to) the inhibition of:44

Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production in macrophages. TNF-α is a cytokine involved in systemic inflammation, secreted by activated macrophages, a type of immune cell that digests foreign substances, microbes and other harmful or damaged components

LPS-induced mRNA levels of TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-1α in glial cells, which results in “diminished apoptotic neuronal cell death”

The production of inflammation-producing enzymes

Calcium influx into the cell, which in turn inhibits:

Pro-inflammatory cytokine release

Histamine and serotonin release from intestinal mast cells release45

According to this paper, quercetin also stabilizes mast cells, has cytoprotective activity in the gastrointestinal tract, and “a direct regulatory effect on basic functional properties of immune cells,” which allows it to inhibit “a huge panoply of molecular targets in the micromolar concentration range, either by down-regulating or suppressing many inflammatory pathways and functions.”46

Quercetin May Be a Useful Supplement for Many

Considering its wide-ranging benefits, quercetin may be a useful supplement for many, either acutely or more long-term. It’s one of the supplements I recommend keeping in your medicine chest for times when you feel you’re “coming down” with something, be it the common cold or influenza.

If you’re prone to colds and flu, you could consider taking it for a couple of months before cold and flu season hits to boost your immune system. More long-term, it appears useful for those with metabolic syndrome, although it would be foolish to rely on any given supplement without also addressing more fundamental strategies such as diet and exercise.

As explained in my 2015 interview with Dr. Robert Lustig, sugar has been shown to be a causative factor in insulin resistance, which is a hallmark of metabolic syndrome and a risk factor for virtually all chronic disease.

If you have one or more of the conditions that make up metabolic syndrome, you’d be wise to limit your total sugar consumption to 15 grams per day. If you’re healthy, and want to stay that way, your daily sugar limit would be around 25 grams. You can learn more about this and related treatment strategies in “Vitamin D Can Significantly Lower Your Risk of Metabolic Syndrome.”

– Sources and References

Why your vitamin D levels are dependent on magnesium

Reproduced from original article:
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vitamin-d-levels(NaturalHealth365) The number of Americans with nutrient deficiencies or even “subclinical insufficiencies” is high, ranging from 10 to 90 percent depending on the study and nutrient in question.  This is exactly why adding high quality nutritional supplements to a balanced diet can help correct these deficits, especially when it comes to low vitamin D levels in the body.

In terms of improving your vitamin D status, it’s important to understand that certain nutrients like magnesium, can greatly improve the absorption of vitamin D.  In fact, research shows that to enjoy optimal bone (and heart) health, you’ll definitely want to consider this critical mineral.

Are you at risk?  Research reveals that your vitamin D levels greatly depend on magnesium

Multiple studies, including a paper from The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, have found that vitamin D deficiency is linked to low magnesium levels. This evidence clearly suggests that magnesium is essential for the proper digestion and assimilation of vitamin D.

“All of the enzymes that metabolize vitamin D seem to require magnesium,” say the authors of the March 2018 paper, called “Role of Magnesium in Vitamin D Activation and Function.”  Magnesium, they add, functions “as a cofactor in the enzymatic reactions in the liver and kidneys.”

The authors also remind readers that a deficiency in either vitamin D, magnesium, or both is linked to a range of conditions including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and bone health impairments.  In addition, a vitamin D deficiency is linked to an increased risk of diabetes, depression, psoriasis, and breast, colon, and prostate cancers!

It seems that increasing your magnesium intake can really pay off, by the way. A 2013 study found that people who regularly consumed foods rich in magnesium were less likely to be deficient in vitamin D compared to people who didn’t consume a lot of magnesium in their diet. And other research shows that people with high levels of magnesium are also less likely to have low bone mineral density (something that vitamin D normally plays a critical role in).

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Get the BEST indoor air purification system – at the LOWEST price, exclusively for NaturalHealth365 readers.  I, personally use this system in my home AND office.  Click HERE to order now – before the sale ends.

These two nutrients are so closely linked that it may be time to start thinking about them as a pair – you can’t worry about one without worrying about the other.

10 rich sources of magnesium designed to boost your overall well-being

As you probably know, healthy (direct) sun exposure is one of the best ways to ensure you produce enough vitamin D within your body.  But, you can also consume vitamin D via supplements or in certain foods such as whole eggs and liver.

But there is one major health concern: If you’re not consuming enough magnesium, then your efforts to get enough of the “sunshine vitamin” will be ineffective, at best.  So, be sure to add in these ten magnesium-rich foods into your weekly diet (and maybe add a high quality magnesium supplement, too):

  1. Bananas
  2. Spinach
  3. Avocado
  4. Cashews
  5. Almonds
  6. Pumpkin seeds
  7. Oily fish
  8. Lima beans
  9. Sesame seeds
  10. Peanut butter

Men, aim for around 400 to 420 milligrams (mg) of magnesium per day. Women, strive for 310 to 320, and if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding consult with your integrative healthcare provider, since you may need more.

Editor’s note: The NaturalHealth365 Store offers the most complete, easy-to-absorb vitamin D3/K2/Magnesium formula on the market.  Click here to order today!

Sources for this article include:

JAOA.org
News-medical.net
Oregonstate.edu
Livescience.com
NIH.gov

10 Natural Substances That Could Help Cure Type 1 Diabetes

© 26th January 2020 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter
Reproduced from original article:
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Posted on:  Wednesday, June 26th 2013 at 9:00 am

Could the long-sought after cure for type 1 diabetes be as close as your kitchen cupboard? An accumulating body of scientific research appears to point in exactly that direction

One so-called ‘incurable disease’ that afflicts millions of people around the world is type 1 diabetes. Unlike type 2 diabetes, where the body becomes resistant to its own insulin, type 1 is characterized by the inability of the body to produce enough insulin, as the beta cells within the pancreas which are responsible for the production of insulin (and the proinsulin from which it is made) are either destroyed or seriously impaired. This can happen due to autoimmune issues, bacterial or viral infections, incompatible foods in the diet and chemical exposures  (or a combination of any one or more of these factors), to name but a few major triggers.

And yet, plenty of peer-reviewed and published research now indicates that plant compounds, including many found within commonly consumed foods, are capable of stimulating beta cell regeneration within the pancreas, and as a result may be potentially provide a cure – truly a four letter word, as far as the profit-based model of medicine goes, which thrives on the concept of the incurability of the disease-afflicted human body in favor of symptom management.

The discovery of the beta cell regenerative potential of various food and compounds is bound to upset a burgeoning diabetes industry, with millions of dollars of public and private money continually being poured into fund-raising efforts for a future “cure”; A cure that will presumably be delivered through the prohibitively expensive pharmaceutical,vaccine or biologic (e.g. stem cells, islet cell xenotransplantation) pipeline, which by the very nature of the FDA drug approval process requires the promotion of synthetic (and therefore patentable) compounds over natural ones.

Let’s take a look at the latest preclinical study on the topic, published last month in the Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology[1]An active fraction of flaxseed, which researchers named Linun usitassimum active fraction (LU6), was found to generate a wide range of benefits in a type 1 diabetes animal model, including the following:

  • Improved glucose utilization in the liver
  • Supported normalized glycogenesis (glucose forming activity) in the liver and muscle tissue
  • Reduced pancreatic and intestinal glucosidase inhibitory activity, which translates into lower post-meal blood sugar elevations

Even more remarkable was the observation that this flaxseed compound normalized plasma insulin and C-peptide levels (C peptide is not C-reactive protein, rather it is a direct indicator of how much insulin is being produced by the beta cells in the body. Learn more), an indication that beta cell function was effectively restored. The researchers described the truly amazing results as follows:

Normalization of plasma insulin and C-peptide levels were observed in diabetic mice, indicating endogenous insulin secretion after the treatment with LU6. The histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis on pancreatic islets suggests the role of LU6 fraction in islet regeneration and insulin secretion as evident in increase functional pancreatic islets producing insulin. Furthermore, significant insulin producing islet formation was also observed in in vitro PANC-1 cells after LU6 treatment, indicating the cellular aggregates to be newly formed islets. This suggests the potential of LU6 fraction in the formation of new islets in vitro, as well as in vivo. Thus, LU6 can be used as a nutraceutical-based first-line treatment for diabetes. [emphasis added]

Keep in mind that this is not the first time that flaxseed has been found to improve blood sugar disorders. We have a few studies on GreenMedInfo.com already indexed on the topic that you can view here: Flaxseed and Diabetes.

Furthermore, we have found a broad range of natural substances experimentally confirmed to stimulate beta cell regeneration, 10 of  which are listed below:

  • Arginine: a 2007 study found that the amino acid L-arginine is capable of stimulating the genesis of beta cells in an animal model of alloxan-induced diabetes.[2]
  • Avocado: A 2007 study found that avocado seed extract reduced blood sugar in diabetic rats. Researchers observed a restorative and protective effect on pancreatic islet cells in the treated group.[3]
  • Berberine: A 2009 study found that this plant compound, commonly found in herbs such as barberry and goldenseal, induces beta cell regeneration in diabetic rats, which lends explanation for why it has been used for 1400 years in China to treat diabetes.[4]
  • Chard: A 2000 study found that chard extract given to diabetic rats stimulates the recovery of injured beta cells.[5]
  • Corn Silk: A 2009 study found that corn silk reduces blood sugar and stimulates beta cell regeneration in type 1 diabetic rats.[6]
  • Curcumin (from Turmeric): A 2010 study found that curcumin stimulates beta cell regeneration in  type 1 diabetic rats.[7] Additionally, a 2008 study found that curcumin preserves pancreatic islet cell survival and transplantation efficiency.[8]
  • Genistein (from soy, red clover): A  2010 study found that genistein induces pancreatic beta-cell proliferation through activation of multiple signaling pathways and prevents insulin-deficient diabetes in mice.[9]
  • Honey: A 2010 human study found that long-term consumption of honey might have positive effects on the metabolic derangements of type 1 diabetes, including possible beta cell regeneration as indicating by increases in fasting C-peptide levels.[10]
  • Nigella Sativa (black seed): A 2003 animal study found that black seed consumption lead to partial regeneration/proliferation of the beta-cells.[11] A 2010 human study also found that the consumption of one gram of black seed a day for up to 12 weeks had a broad range of beneficial effects in diabetics, including increasing beta cell function.[12]
  • Stevia: A 2011 human study found that stevia has anti-diabetic properties, including revitalizing damaged beta cells, and compares favorably with the drug glibenclamide but without the adverse effects.[13] 

For a full list of beta cell regenerating substances, view our page on the topic. The data is also available to download as a PDF, which members can acquire by using their membership tokens without paying the nominal fee.

For additional research on the topic of regenerative medicine and diabetes you can consult the articles 6 Bodily Tissues that Can Be Regenerated Through Nutrition and Diabetes: An Entirely Preventable and Reversible Disease. Or,  visit our Health Guide on Blood Sugar Disorders.


References

[1] Menakshi Bhat Dusane, Bimba N Joshi. Beneficial effect of flax seeds in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice: isolation of active fraction having islet regenerative and glucosidase inhibitory properties. Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2013 May ;91(5):325-31. Epub 2013 Jan 16. PMID: 23656171

[2] Ana Vasilijevic, Biljana Buzadzic, Aleksandra Korac, Vesna Petrovic, Aleksandra Jankovic, Bato Korac.Beneficial effects of L-arginine nitric oxide-producing pathway in rats treated with alloxan. J Physiol. 2007 Nov 1;584(Pt 3):921-33. Epub 2007 Aug 23. PMID: 17717015

[3] Do Edem, Is Ekanem, Pe Ebong. Effect of aqueous extracts of alligator pear seed (Persea americana mill) on blood glucose and histopathology of pancreas in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Transplantation. 2007 Jul 27;84(2):173-9. PMID: 19553173

[4] Jiyin Zhou, Shiwen Zhou, Jianlin Tang, Kebin Zhang, Lixia Guang, Yongping Huang, Ying Xu, Yi Ying, Le Zhang, Dandan Li. Protective effect of berberine on beta cells in streptozotocin- and high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet-induced diabetic rats. Eur J Pharmacol. 2009 Mar 15;606(1-3):262-8. Epub 2009 Jan 19. PMID: 19374872

[5] S Bolkent, R Yanardağ, A Tabakoğlu-Oğuz, O Ozsoy-Saçan. Effects of chard (Beta vulgaris L. var. Cicla) extract on pancreatic B cells in streptozotocin-diabetic rats: a morphological and biochemical study. J Ethnopharmacol. 2000 Nov;73(1-2):251-9. PMID: 11025163

[6] Jianyou Guo, Tongjun Liu, Linna Han, Yongmei Liu. The effects of corn silk on glycaemic metabolism. Nutr Metab (Lond).2009 Nov 23;6:47. PMID: 19930631

[7] Malee Chanpoo, Hattaya Petchpiboonthai, Busaba Panyarachun, Vipavee Anupunpisit. Effect of curcumin in the amelioration of pancreatic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. J Med Assoc Thai. 2010 Nov;93 Suppl 6:S152-9. PMID: 21280528

[8] Meghana Kanitkar, Ramesh R Bhonde. Curcumin treatment enhances islet recovery by induction of heat shock response proteins, Hsp70 and heme oxygenase-1, during cryopreservation.Life Sci. 2008 Jan 16;82(3-4):182-9. Epub 2007 Nov 21. PMID: 18093618

[9] Zhuo Fu, Wen Zhang, Wei Zhen, Hazel Lum, Jerry Nadler, Josep Bassaganya-Riera, Zhenquan Jia, Yanwen Wang, Hara Misra, Dongmin Liu. Genistein induces pancreatic beta-cell proliferation through activation of multiple signaling pathways and prevents insulin-deficient diabetes in mice. Endocrinology. 2010 Jul ;151(7):3026-37. Epub 2010 May 19. PMID: 20484465

[10] Mamdouh M Abdulrhman, Mohamed H El-Hefnawy, Rasha H Aly, Rania H Shatla, Rasha M Mamdouh, Doaa M Mahmoud, Waheed S Mohamed. Metabolic Effects of Honey in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Crossover Pilot Study. J Med Food. 2012 Dec 20. Epub 2012 Dec 20. PMID: 23256446

[11] Mehmet Kanter, Ismail Meral, Zabit Yener, Hanefi Ozbek, Halit Demir. Partial regeneration/proliferation of the beta-cells in the islets of Langerhans by Nigella sativa L. in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Tohoku J Exp Med. 2003 Dec;201(4):213-9. PMID: 14690013

[12] Abdullah O Bamosa, Huda Kaatabi, Fatma M Lebdaa, Abdul-Muhssen Al Elq, Ali Al-Sultanb. Effect of Nigella sativa seeds on the glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2010 Oct-Dec;54(4):344-54. PMID: 21675032

[13] Himanshu Misra, Manish Soni, Narendra Silawat, Darshana Mehta, B K Mehta, D C Jain. Antidiabetic activity of medium-polar extract from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana Bert. (Bertoni) on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. J Pharm Bioallied Sci. 2011 Apr ;3(2):242-8. PMID: 21687353

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

5 ways fasting can improve your lifespan and overall wellbeing

Reproduced from original article:
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by:  | January 20, 2020

Fasting can boost your lifespan and your health in these 5 ways(NaturalHealth365) These days, you can’t seem to have a conversation about longevity without talking about fasting. Fasting is now considered a promising way to help people live longer – just one of the many health benefits of fasting we’re now seeing in the research.

And boy, is there a lot of research.  Scientists are exploring different types of fasting (including time-restricted eating, where you eat for 6-8 hours per day and fast for the rest) in both animal and human models – and, the results may make you want to close up the kitchen for the next half day or so.

Exciting research: How to slow down the negative effects of aging with fasting

A recent literature review published in the New England Journal of Medicine has concluded that, based on years of prior data, fasting can help you live longer!  This is consistent with other data from institutions such as the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Louisiana’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center, where researchers found that daily fasting improves health and longevity in animal models – independent of what or how much the animals ate! 

Aside from maximizing your lifespan, a consistent fasting routine may also help you optimize your healthspan, too. Here are five other benefits of fasting based on the current research:

  1. It lowers blood pressure – so may reduce your risk of heart disease
  2. It promotes fat loss and may help treat or prevent obesity
  3. It enhances blood sugar control by boosting insulin resistance – and thus may treat or prevent type 2 diabetes
  4. It slows tumor growth and therefore poses as a promising holistic treatment against cancer
  5. It may promote growth hormone production, which helps build stronger muscles and a healthy metabolism

5 tips on how to fast successfully

  1. Get medical supervision first: Fasting has been studied on individuals from all walks of life, and it’s shown to be safe and effective even for people with chronic health conditions like obesity and cancer. However, fasting isn’t for everyone, and there are some risks (such as dangerously low blood sugar in people with diabetes). Get your doctor’s approval prior to testing out fasting for yourself – especially if you’re about to explore a prolonged fast lasting 24 hours or more.
  2. Find a fasting template that works for you: Whether you choose an alternate day fast, time-restricted eating, 5/2 fasting, or some other model, it helps if you something you actually like and will fit your lifestyle. This may require some front-end research and trial and error on your part, but be willing to give fasting an honest go (fasting apps like Zero can be helpful!).
  3. Drink lots of pure (clean) water: This will keep you hydrated and keep those hunger pangs at bay. Most fasting practitioners also say that calorie-free beverages like black coffee, teas, and seltzer waters are A-OK on a fast, too. To keep yourself from getting cramps or headaches, add a pinch of sea salt to replenish your electrolytes.
  4. If you’re already a regular exerciser, feel free to be active during your fasting window.  Just don’t overdo it.  In fact, some research suggests that performing aerobic workouts in a fasted state may enhance endurance and muscles’ ability to use oxygen. Just use caution, stay hydrated (see the previous tip), and modify or stop what you’re doing if you start to notice any exercise intolerance symptoms like lightheadedness or heart palpitations.
  1. Break your fast with a normal sized meal: Try not to gorge yourself, as this could cause gastrointestinal upset. And if you want to extend the fat-burning state your body is in after a longer fast, consider eating a meal that’s rich in proteins and healthy fats, along with some low-carb foods like kale or cabbage.

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Sources for this article include:

Lifeextension.com
CNN.com
NIH.gov
NEJM.org
Healthline.com