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Daily dose of baking soda may help combat autoimmune disease

Reproduced from original article:
www.naturalhealth365.com/autoimmune-disease-baking-soda-3415.html

by:  | May 25, 2020

autoimmune-disease(NaturalHealth365) According to the National Institutes of Health, over 23 million Americans currently live with some type of autoimmune disease – which can encompass such potentially debilitating conditions as rheumatic arthritis, lupus, irritable bowel disease, type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Autoimmune diseases – which arise when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own organs, tissues and cells – are notoriously complex and difficult to treat.

But encouraging research shows that a common, familiar household staple – baking soda – can function as a potent weapon against them.

A recent study not only revealed baking soda’s ability to fight autoimmune disease – but showcased its ability to work at the cellular and molecular level.  For a lowly cooking ingredient, baking soda seems to have some highly sophisticated and powerful effects!

Can baking soda help those suffering with autoimmune disease?

Baking soda, also known as bicarbonate of soda, has a variety of household and medical uses.

It has long been used as a natural toothpaste, a non-toxic deodorant and a cheap, quick-acting antacid to treat heartburn. In addition, some nephrologists advise small daily doses of baking soda to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease.

After clinical studies affirmed baking soda’s beneficial effects on chronic kidney disease, researchers wondered what other conditions it could improve.  And they soon had their answer.

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In a study conducted by scientists at Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University and published in April 2018 in Journal of Immunology, the team found that drinking baking soda in water every day for two weeks helped to reduce the destructive inflammation of autoimmune disorders.

The key to baking soda’s action was the way it affected mesothelial cells on the exterior of the spleen. These specialized immune cells have microvilli that sense the environment and warn when an immune response is needed in order to defend against invading pathogens.

But in autoimmune disorders, this response can be inappropriate, excessive and damaging.

Baking soda helped the cells to convey the message that a protective immune response need not be triggered. In the words of study co-author Dr. Paul O’Connor, the compound helped reassure the immune system that there was no pathogen to be fought. “It’s most likely a hamburger, not a bacterial infection,” explained Dr. O’Connor.

It’s official: Baking soda reduces the inflammatory actions of cells

Bicarbonate of soda also affects the population of immune cells called macrophages, which engulf and destroy pathogens.  The scientists found that it shifted the macrophage population to a higher percentage of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, while decreasing pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages.

Although the initial research was conducted on rats, the researchers studied healthy human volunteers as well.  And these human participants also experienced an anti-inflammatory response from the baking soda.

In addition, the group who took baking soda had more inflammation-regulating T cells, which discourage the immune system from attacking tissue.

The researchers concluded that baking soda was a “cheap, relatively safe, effective and … noninvasive method to activate cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways, which may be of benefit to patients suffering from a multitude of inflammatory disease states.”

In a separate study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found that baking soda could specifically benefit rheumatoid arthritis – an autoimmune condition. The scientists concluded that baking soda and water helped reduce inflammation and disease severity.

Baking soda’s antiviral effects are currently being studied

Scientists have found that certain pH-dependent viruses – which happen to include some influenza viruses and coronaviruses – are most able to replicate and spread under acid conditions (pH6.0) and are deactivated completely at pH 8.0.

Baking soda raises acidic pH to higher alkaline levels – a fact with exciting implications for possibly slowing the spread of COVID-19 and other viral infections. While clinical studies have yet to be performed, cell and animal studies attest to the effects of alkalinity on viruses.

In fact, baking soda has been used to fight a pandemic in the past.  In 1918 and 1919, Dr. Edward R. Hays – a physician with the U.S. Health Department – utilized baking soda against the Spanish flu, claiming that it could lead to a resolution of symptoms within 36 hours.

In addition to antiviral and inflammation-fighting effects, baking soda can improve general health in myriad other ways.  According to noted doctor and author Dr. Eddy Bettermann, baking soda increases bicarbonates in the blood – in turn increasing carbon dioxide and helping with oxygenation of body organs.

And Dr. Lynda Frassetto of the University of California notes that baking soda can reduce acidic wastes in the body – which show up as cholesterol, fatty acids, uric acid, phosphate and kidney stones.

How much baking soda should I take?

While the University of Georgia scientists did not reveal the daily amount of baking soda used in the study, many natural health experts recommend half a teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in a cup or two of water a day.

Of course, check with your doctor before using baking soda to treat kidney disease, autoimmune disorders or any other medical condition. It is especially important to seek your physician’s guidance if you have high blood pressure, as baking soda is very high in sodium.

Health warning: To avoid possible gastric rupture, don’t take baking soda when your stomach is excessively full – such as after a huge meal.

While autoimmune disease can be a formidable foe, the simple, old-fashioned remedy of baking soda in water may emerge as a front-line defense against it.

Sources for this article include:

Jagwire.Augusta.Edu
DrEddyMD.com
Sciencedaily.com

5 Top Anxiety-Relieving Foods

© 19th June 2020 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter
Reproduced from original article:
www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/5-top-anxiety-relieving-foods

Posted on: Friday, June 19th 2020 at 2:15 pm

Written By: GreenMedInfo Research Group
This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2020

Is anxiety affecting your life negatively? Don’t fret — you can soothe your spirit and hunger with these five anxiety-relieving foods that are good for your body and your mood

According to the American Psychiatric Association, nearly two-thirds of U.S. residents surveyed in 2017 were “extremely or somewhat anxious” about the health and safety of themselves and their families, with more than a third feeling “more anxious overall” than they did in 2016.[i] With more recent data indicating that feelings of anxiety are on the rise,[ii] and have since skyrocketed due to COVID-19 and related shutdowns and stay-at-home orders, it’s important to know what to do to keep your central nervous system calm and supported during times of increased stress.

While allopathic doctors generally advocate pills to treat anxiety, there is mounting evidence showing that these medications can have many negative side effects including addiction, depressionsuicideseizuressexual dysfunctionheadaches and more.[iii]

Practitioners of natural health know that food is the best medicine, and some foods are better than others when it comes to soothing body and mind. Here are five of the top foods to eat to stimulate feelings of calm and well-being from the inside-out.

1. Fish

Cold-water fishes like salmon, cod, mackerel and sardines are under-consumed in the U.S., which culturally favors protein from sources like beef and chicken. This is a dietary misstep if you want to quell anxious energy. Rich in the essential amino acids L-lysine and L-arginine as well as healthy omega-3 fatty acids, increasing your intake of clean fish may help relieve anxiety by promoting a healthy brain and enhanced mood.

Studies have shown that individuals with L-lysine deficiency are at higher risk of anxiety,[iv] while L-lysine supplementation lowers anxiety and reduces the impact of stress.[v] In clinical trials, supplementation with L-arginine reduced synthesis of cortisol, a major stress hormone, in healthy human subjects.[vi]

Consumption of adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids has been shown to enhance mood[vii] and reduce the risk of anxiety.[viii] Supplementation for a period of three months with a high-quality source of omega-3s has even been shown to support withdrawal-related anxiety in a trial with substance abuse patients.[ix] Just a few servings per week of healthy fish may be sufficient to receive these benefits.

Widespread pollution of our oceans as well as the environmental impacts of overfishing have made some people wary of eating fish. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has produced a useful guide to choosing the most nutritious and clean fish from sustainable sources, including a calculator to help you customize portion sizes for optimal nutrition while minimizing negative impact on the planet.[x]

2. Nuts

Many essential proteins and fats are available from nuts like Brazil nuts, almonds and walnuts, plus vitamins D and E and the mineral selenium, all proven to reduce anxious feelings.

Vitamin D has been studied for its positive effects on mood, possibly due to its action as a steroid hormone with many important functions in the brain. Vitamin D deficiencies have been linked to multiple behavioral disorders, including anxiety and depression in patients with fibromyalgia.[xi] A study on mice showed that specimens with fewer vitamin D receptors in the brain demonstrated increased anxiety-like behaviors, suggesting that adequate vitamin D intake can be an important factor for healthy emotional behavior.[xii]

Almonds are a potent source of vitamin E, a powerful scavenger of damaging free radicals, which is linked to a healthy brain response to fearful conditions. Vitamin E supplementation was found in one animal study to improve fear response in rats that were exposed to healthy vitamin E levels in utero, versus impaired fear response and increased anxiety in rats whose mothers were deprived of this essential nutrient during pregnancy.[xiii] One cup of ground almonds (a great addition to many recipes) provides 125% of an adult’s Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of vitamin E.[xiv]

Brazil nuts are one of the best sources of selenium, an essential trace mineral that is critical for optimal health.  A clinical trial of adults who were supplemented with 100 micrograms (mcg) of selenium per day reported less anxiety than the placebo group. According to the report, the lower the level of selenium in the diet, the higher the levels of anxiety, depression and tiredness among patients, all of which decreased following five weeks of selenium therapy. [xv]

Adults over 14 years of age are recommended to intake 55 mcg of selenium each day.[xvi] A small handful of Brazil nuts (six to eight nuts) delivers a whopping 544 mcg, more than enough to take the edge off your mood.[xvii]

All of these nuts provide essential amino acids and fatty acids that produce the mood-regulating hormones serotonin and dopamine, adding to their potential for helping to regulate mood and improve overall mental health.[xviii]

3. Yogurt

Fermented foods like yogurt have long been acknowledged as beneficial for gut health due to the presence of friendly bacteria known as probiotics, which help protect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract against harmful pathogens and potentially dangerous microbes. As the understanding of the gut-brain connection develops, science is further acknowledging the benefits of fermented foods on brain health and even mood regulation.

A 2014 study on the effects of daily intake of yogurt enriched with probiotics by adults with high-trait anxiety disorder found that individuals who consumed enriched yogurt had healthier stress responses than those who consumed non-enriched yogurt, suggesting that eating probiotic-enriched yogurt aids in coping with chronic stress.[xix]

This beneficial activity may be due to probiotics’ neuroprotective effect on the brain. A study on healthy women with no gastrointestinal or psychiatric symptoms showed that ingesting a fermented milk product with probiotic for four weeks led to “robust alteration” within specific brain regions that control processing of emotion and sensation, leading researchers to assert that consuming such probiotic-rich foods may work to prevent anxious feelings from developing.[xx]

Other studies on animals and humans have shown that fermented food consumption is associated with fewer symptoms of social anxiety[xxi] and lowered risk of depression.[xxii]

It should be noted that there are plenty of alternatives to cow’s milk-based yogurt products today, such as coconut-, almond, and goat’s milk, all of which can help to prevent bovine casein-associated adverse health effects which we have documented in detail on our cow’s milk database here.

4. Green Tea for Theanine

Having a daily tea ritual is a great way to weave a moment of calm into your days. Besides the benefits of taking a break from daily concerns to boil water, select a cup and let it steep, drinking tea is a great way to boost your brain’s ability to ward off stress. There are more than 400 reasons to drink green tea, and for most adults today, feeling less stressed is at the top of the list.

A Singapore study on 60 healthy seniors showed that those with a regular tea habit had brain scans showing improved brain organization brought about by tea’s ability to prevent disruption of interregional connections. In other words, the different brain regions had more and healthier interconnections; they were more organized with better hemispheric symmetry.[xxiii]

Green tea’s magical properties are attributed primarily to L-theanine, an active polyphenol in green tea that may be at the heart of its ability to calm nerves and fortify the brain. An amino acid, theanine produces a soothing effect by stimulating production of GABA and dopamine, neurotransmitters known to play a role in anxiety[xxiv] and pleasurable sensations.

Green tea contains another potent phytochemical called EGCG, short for epigallocatechin-gallate, another polyphenol in green tea that has gained a lot of attention as a potential therapeutic agent for preventing neurodegenerative inflammatory diseases.[xxv] And if you need any more reasons to start a green tea habit, regular tea drinking may bolster the immune system to prevent influenza infection.

If you’re wondering how much is too much, the answer is it’s very hard to overdo green tea consumption. A 2009 study conducted in Japan, one of the largest consumer countries of green tea, found that those who consumed more than 5 cups per day had significantly less stress than those who drank less than 1 cup per day.[xxvi] In other words, the more you drink, the better you feel. So, put on the kettle and start feeling better.

5. Dark Chocolate

While you engage in afternoon tea, why not break off a square (or two) of fine dark chocolate? Don’t worry about the jitters one might associate with chocolate; dark chocolate is clinically shown to improve anxiety and deliver a potent feel-good boost of serotonin.[xxvii]

Cocoa contains more active phenolic antioxidants than most foods, a factor that can benefit brain function.[xxviii] One could argue that dark chocolate tastes better than most foods too, a factor that has been clinically shown to impart a soothing effect to individuals who are prone to mood disorders.[xxix]

Dark chocolate isn’t just about taste; it’s got minerals like magnesium that are important for brain health and mood. A large square of dark chocolate with 70% to 85% cacao provides around 36 milligrams (mg) of magnesium, nearly 10% of the U.S. RDA for adults.[xxx]

Magnesium is considered an essential supplement for psychiatric patients due to the role it plays in calming the nervous system.[xxxi] A 2011 study of highly stressed individuals showed that eating 40 grams of dark chocolate every day for two weeks led to participants reporting significantly lower stress levels than participants eating milk or white chocolates.[xxxii]

Eating dark chocolate has been shown to boost the neurotransmitter serotonin, which can lead to fewer and milder feelings of anxiety due to an enhanced ability to manage stress.[xxxiii] By adding a serving of dark chocolate to your day, you can impart a wide array of self-care benefits to both enhance your mood and increase your resilience to life’s daily stressors. There is no reason not to indulge.

For additional information on anxiety-reducing foods and herbs, visit our database dedicated to the topic here. To learn more about the ways nutrition can support a sane, healthy lifestyle, consult GreenMedInfo.com’s repository of articles as the world’s most widely referenced, evidence-based natural medical resource.


References

[i] American Psychiatric Association, Newsroom, APA Public Opinion Poll – Annual Meeting 2017, https://www.psychiatry.org/newsroom/apa-public-opinion-poll-annual-meeting-2017 [Accessed April 10, 2020]

[ii] American Psychiatric Association, Newsroom, APA Public Opinion Poll – Annual Meeting 2018, https://www.psychiatry.org/newsroom/apa-public-opinion-poll-annual-meeting-2018 [Accessed April 10, 2020]

[iii] Alramadhan E, Hanna MS, Hanna MS, Goldstein TA, Avila SM, Weeks BS. Dietary and botanical anxiolytics. Med Sci Monit. 2012;18(4):RA40-RA48. doi:10.12659/msm.882608, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3560823/

[iv] Ghosh S, Smriga M, Vuvor F, et al. Effect of lysine supplementation on health and morbidity in subjects belonging to poor peri-urban households in Accra, Ghana. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;92(4):928-39. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20720257

[v] Smriga M, Ghosh S, Mouneimne Y, et al. Lysine fortification reduces anxiety and lessens stress in family members in economically weak communities in Northwest Syria. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2004;101(22):8285-88. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15159538

[vi] Smriga M, Ando T, Akutsu M, et al. Oral treatment with L-lysine and L-arginine reduces anxiety and basal cortisol levels in healthy humans. Biomed Res. 2007;28(2):85-90. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17510493

[vii] Perica MM, Delas I. Essential Fatty acids and psychiatric disorders. Nutr Clin Pract. 2011;26(4):409-25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21775637

[viii] Appleton KM, Rogers PJ, Ness AR. Is there a role for n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the regulation of mood and behaviour? A review of the evidence to date from epidemiological studies, clinical studies and intervention trials. Nutr Res Rev. 2008;21(1):13-41. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19079852

[ix] Buydens-Branchey L, Branchey M, Hibbeln JR. Associations between increases in plasma n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids following supplementation and decreases in anger and anxiety in substance abusers. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2008;32(2):568-75. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18060675

[x] Environmental Working Group Consumer Guide to Seafood https://www.ewg.org/research/ewgs-good-seafood-guide?gclid=Cj0KCQjw-Mr0BRDyARIsAKEFbecYJ5AL5Fy3CUMbQFWGkP6I9Zlwruvv6AgBPMcDOHfXkwR8eCUGKagaAhoUEALw_wcB

[xi] Armstrong DJ1, Meenagh GK, Bickle I, Lee AS, Curran ES, Finch MB. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with anxiety and depression in fibromyalgia. Clin Rheumatol. 2007 Apr;26(4):551-4. Epub 2006 Jul 19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16850115

[xii] Kalueff AV1, Lou YR, Laaksi I, Tuohimaa P. Increased anxiety in mice lacking vitamin D receptor gene. Neuroreport. 2004 Jun 7;15(8):1271-4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15167547

[xiii] Ambrogini P, Ciuffoli S, Lattanzi D, et al. Maternal dietary loads of α-tocopherol differentially influence fear conditioning and spatial learning in adult offspring. Physiol Behav. 2011;104(5):809-15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21839761

[xiv] Self Nutrition Data, Facts, Nuts and Seeds, Almonds, https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3085/2

[xv] Benton D., Cook R. The impact of selenium supplementation on mood. Biol Psychiatry. 1991 Jun 1;29(11):1092-8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1873372

[xvi] National Institutes of Health, Fact Sheets, Selenium, https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Selenium-HealthProfessional/

[xvii] National Institutes of Health, Fact Sheets, Selenium, https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Selenium-HealthProfessional/

[xviii] Murphy M, Mercer JG. Diet-regulated anxiety. Int J Endocrinol. 2013;2013:701967. doi:10.1155/2013/701967. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3762204/

[xix] Jaatinen N1, Korpela R, Poussa T, Turpeinen A, Mustonen S, Merilahti J, Peuhkuri K. Effects of daily intake of yoghurt enriched with bioactive components on chronic stress responses: a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2014 Jun;65(4):507-14. doi: 10.3109/09637486.2014.880669. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24490888

[xx] Tillisch K, Labus J, Kilpatrick L, et al. Consumption of fermented milk product with probiotic modulates brain activity. Gastroenterology. 2013;144(7):1394-1401.e14014. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2013.02.043. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3839572/

[xxi] Hilimire MR, DeVylder JE, Forestell CA. Fermented foods, neuroticism, and social anxiety: An interaction model. Psychiatry Res. 2015 Aug 15;228(2):203-8. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.04.023. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25998000

[xxii] Selhub EM, Logan AC, Bested AC. Fermented foods, microbiota, and mental health: ancient practice meets nutritional psychiatry. J Physiol Anthropol. 2014;33(1):2. Published 2014 Jan 15. doi:10.1186/1880-6805-33-2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3904694/

[xxiii] Junhua Li, Rafael Romero-Garcia, John Suckling, Lei Feng. Habitual tea drinking modulates brain efficiency: evidence from brain connectivity evaluation. Aging, 2019; 11 (11): 3876 DOI: 10.18632/aging.102023

[xxiv] Lydiard RB. The role of GABA in anxiety disorders. J Clin Psychiatry. 2003;64 Suppl 3:21-7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12662130

[xxv] Singh NA, Mandal AK, Khan ZA. Potential neuroprotective properties of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Nutr J. 2016;15(1):60. Published 2016 Jun 7. doi:10.1186/s12937-016-0179-4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4897892/#CR5

[xxvi] Hozawa A, Kuriyama S, Nakaya N, Ohmori-Matsuda K, Kakizaki M, Sone T, Nagai M, Sugawara Y, Nitta A, Tomata Y, Niu K, Tsuji I.

Green tea consumption is associated with lower psychological distress in a general population: the Ohsaki Cohort 2006 Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Nov;90(5):1390-6. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28214. Epub 2009 Sep 30. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19793850

[xxvii] Nehlig A. The neuroprotective effects of cocoa flavanol and its influence on cognitive performance. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2013;75(3):716-727. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2125.2012.04378. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3575938/

[xxviii] Katz DL, Doughty K, Ali A. Cocoa and chocolate in human health and disease. Antioxid Redox Signal. 2011;15(10):2779-2811. doi:10.1089/ars.2010.3697. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4696435/

[xxix] Katz DL, Doughty K, Ali A. Cocoa and chocolate in human health and disease. Antioxid Redox Signal. 2011;15(10):2779-2811. doi:10.1089/ars.2010.3697. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4696435/

[xxx] Katz DL, Doughty K, Ali A. Cocoa and chocolate in human health and disease. Antioxid Redox Signal. 2011;15(10):2779-2811. doi:10.1089/ars.2010.3697. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4696435/

[xxxi] Ruppersberg J et al. The mechanism of magnesium block of NMDA receptors. Seminars in Neuroscience. 1994;6(2): 87-96. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1044576584710128

[xxxii] Al Sunni A, Latif R. Effects of chocolate intake on Perceived Stress; a Controlled Clinical Study. Int J Health Sci (Qassim). 2014;8(4):393-401. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350893/

[xxxiii] Nehlig A. The neuroprotective effects of cocoa flavanol and its influence on cognitive performance. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2013;75(3):716-727. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2125.2012.04378. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3575938/

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

Why take glutathione and vitamin C together?

Reproduced from original article:
www.naturalhealth365.com/glutathione-vitamin-c-3438.html

by:  | June 13, 2020

glutathione-and-vitamin-c(NaturalHealth365) According to the National Health Council, a troubling 50 percent of American adults suffer greatly with their health.  Thankfully, recent research has shown that a pair of natural substances – glutathione and vitamin C – can help to increase the body’s natural antioxidant defense system.  This, in turn, helps to reduce the risk of excess oxidative stress – which leads to a diminished quality of life.

Researchers have found that these natural compounds work in concert, with each helping to replenish and recycle the other. Let’s take a closer look at the health benefits that are obtained by taking these two natural substances together.

Glutathione and vitamin C: Two “superstar” antioxidants join forces

Glutathione – one of the most powerful antioxidants in the body – is also its premier detoxifying molecule, working to neutralize pathogens, environmental toxins and carcinogens.  In addition, it boosts the immune system, increases strength and endurance and encourages the body to form lean muscle rather than fat.

In fact, so strongly tied is glutathione to health and well-being that scientists can use glutathione levels to predict longevity – quite a testament to its influence in the body!

Unfortunately, glutathione levels can be threatened by toxic drugs, environmental toxins and chronic stress – as well as by normal aging.  Unsurprisingly, healthy young people have the highest levels of glutathione, while elderly, hospitalized patients have the very lowest.

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Like glutathione, vitamin C can help to boost immune system function.  In fact, studies have shown that vitamin C increases production of life protective antibodies and promotes the function of phagocytes, the body’s scavenger cells.

In addition, vitamin C – which has potent antioxidant, antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties – can protect fragile cell membranes and prevent damage to cell DNA, as well as to important proteins and enzymes (including glutathione).  It is also a cofactor in the production of collagen – which is essential to arterial and heart health.

So, it’s clear to see: insufficient stores of glutathione and vitamin C can cause serious health issues.

Stronger together: Glutathione and vitamin C empower each other

Together, these two antioxidants neutralize harmful free radicals.  This is important, because free radicals cause the unhealthy peroxidation of cell membrane lipids, leading to eventual cell death and increased likelihood of sickness.

Noted functional physician and author Dr. Mark Hyman uses the “hot potato” analogy to explain the antioxidant actions of glutathione and vitamin C.  Free radicals get bounced like a “hot potato” from one antioxidant to another, shuttling from vitamin C to vitamin E – then on to lipoic acid, and finally, glutathione.

Glutathione “cools off” the free radicals while recycling the other antioxidants, sacrificing itself in the process. However, the process ends with the regeneration of more glutathione.  In other words, glutathione and vitamin C function as a “buddy act,” in which each has the other’s back.

Vitamin C also helps to protect glutathione in the tissues, while glutathione coverts worn-out vitamin C (dehydroascorbic acid) back into its active form.  In fact, a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition demonstrated that glutathione can actually alleviate vitamin C deficiency.

Research sheds light on the effects of glutathione and vitamin C on oxidative stress

In one study involving 200 healthy young adults and published in Preventive Nutrition and Food Science, the team found that low dietary intake of vitamin C caused increased oxidative stress, while reducing levels of glutathione.

Even though the subjects were young and relatively healthy, only 38 percent of them had sufficient intake of vitamin C.  Significantly, the low intake group had higher levels of markers of oxidative stress, such as malondialdehyde, nitrites and nitrates. The higher-intake group had fewer markers of oxidative stress, and more life protective antioxidant capacity.

A separate study yielded evidence of the benefits of combining quercetin and vitamin C.

In a placebo-controlled study conducted in 2012, a group of healthy young men were given either 250 mg a day of vitamin C, 500 mg of quercetin, vitamin C and quercetin together, or a placebo for eight weeks.

And the results were eye-opening.

The researchers found that the most pronounced improvements to inflammation levels and cell health occurred in the group that took both supplements. Participants experienced a dramatic 50 percent decrease in levels of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein – compared to 35 percent in the vitamin C-only group and the quercetin-only group.

Other research has demonstrated vitamin C’s ability to promote the creation of glutathione in the body.

Another study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that two weeks of supplementation with vitamin C, in amounts ranging from 500 mg to 2,000 mg, increased glutathione production by 50 percent – significantly more than increases conferred by high-dose N-acetyl-cysteine.

This is impressive, because NAC has such potent glutathione-restoring abilities that it is used in hospitals to replenish depleted glutathione in the liver resulting from acetaminophen overdose.

Boost glutathione and vitamin C with diet and proper supplementation

You can help your body increase its glutathione production by eating sulfur-rich foods, such as garlic, onions and cruciferous vegetables including Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower and arugula.

And, bioactive non-denatured whey protein is rich in cysteine, one of the “building blocks” of glutathione.  Supplements such as N-acetyl-cysteine, milk thistle and alpha-lipoic acid help the body produce, recycle and replenish glutathione.

When it comes to ramping up vitamin C intake, red bell peppers, kiwi fruit, strawberries and citrus fruits are among the best sources.

If you would like to take glutathione in supplementary form, many natural health experts advise liposomal glutathione as the most bioactive.  Integrative healthcare providers typically recommend between 250 mg and 500 mg of glutathione a day – but check first with your own doctor before making any changes to your supplement routine.

While the National Institutes of Health lists 65 to 90 mg per day of vitamin C as the recommended daily amount, most experienced healthcare providers will suggest much greater amounts to obtain true health protective results.  Your integrative doctor can help advise an amount that is right for you.

Bottom line: when it comes to protecting your health, glutathione and vitamin C are “on the job.” Maybe it’s time to put this dynamic duo to work for you?

Sources for this article include:

Academic.oup.com
NIH.gov
NIH.gov
NationalHealthCouncil.org

Top Five Best and Worst Anti-Aging Substances

© 11th June 2020 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter
Reproduced from original article:
www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/top-five-best-and-worst-anti-aging-substances

Posted on:  Thursday, June 11th 2020 at 5:00 pm

Written By:  GreenMedInfo Research Group

This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2020

Americans are obsessed with reducing the effects of aging on their hair, skin, muscles and brain. Here are five substances that can improve the aging process and five more that dramatically worsen the effects of time on your body

Many of you are aware that how you look and feel largely depends on what you put into your body. The health of your gut, brain, eyes, muscles and even skin can be improved or worsened through your diet and lifestyle choices.

This list highlights the best and worst substances for aging, and by adding or removing these items from your diet you can dramatically mediate the effects of time on your body and decrease your risk of age-related illnesses.

Five Best Anti-Aging Substances

1. Melatonin

Melatonin’s anti-stress properties, as well as its effects on the immune system, have been well researched for their anti-aging effects.[i] Additional anti-aging benefits of melatonin include its ability to improve the microstructure of bones and protect the skin.[ii],[iii] Melatonin has also been studied for its beneficial effects on a variety of age-related diseases, including cancer.[iv]

2. Curcumin

Curcumin’s anti-aging effects come from its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which work to suppress NF-kappaB-dependent inflammation, a type of inflammation believed to be responsible for the development of many age-related disorders in which cellular senescence is involved, including cancer and atherosclerosis.[v],[vi],[vii]

Curcumin may also lower the risk for age-associated cognitive disorders like Alzheimer’s disease and researchers believe that curcumin could be used as a therapeutic cognitive treatment for elderly adults.[viii]

3. Coffee

Research has demonstrated that caffeine, a bioactive natural compound present in coffee, protects against oxidative stress-related skin disease.[ix]

Caffeine may also protect against age-related cognitive diseases such as Alzheimer’s and dementia, and a recent study found that drinking three to five cups of coffee each day decreased the risk of these disorders by 65%.[x]

Although additional research is necessary to further study these effects, researchers are enthusiastic about coffee’s therapeutic benefits. Further, research suggests many of the benefits may stem not only from caffeine but from other natural compounds in coffee as well.

4. Grape Seed Extract

Grape seed extract is known for its high concentration of proanthocyanidins, a type of polyphenol known for its immunomodulating effects and ability to protect against oxidative stress and lower cholesterol.[xi] Proanthocyanidins also inhibit the progression of atherosclerosis and diabetes, two common diseases often associated with aging.[xii]

5. Probiotics

A common concern with aging is the appearance of the skin. Probiotics work to restore the acidic pH balance of skin and improve photoaging, premature aging of the skin caused by excess exposure to UV radiation, through the up-regulation of antioxidant components.[xiii],[xiv],[xv]

Additionally, many degenerative diseases are related to imbalances of gut microbiota, microorganisms necessary for optimal nutrient metabolism.[xvi] Changes in diet and microbial diversity throughout life may lead to a higher risk of infections and diseases, but researchers believe that a daily intake of probiotic supplements or foods may improve the aging process and reduce the risk of age-related disorders.[xvii]

Five Worst Anti-Aging Substances

1. Artificial Sweeteners

Researchers have found that intake of artificial sweeteners such as aspartame or sucralose is associated with a higher risk of weight gain and may contribute to the risk of developing diabetes.[xviii]

Additional risks of artificial sweeteners include their adverse effects on the gut microbiome, increasing the risk of tissue inflammation and diseases associated with improper gut microbiota balance, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity.[xix],[xx]

2. Sugar

Research has demonstrated that glucose (sucrose, or table sugar, is made up of glucose and fructose) negatively impacts skin repair by cross-linking collagen fibers, and diets high in sugar are linked with a higher perceived age among diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.[xxi],[xxii]

By reducing glycation load, it’s possible to effectively lower premature cellular senescence in skin fibroblasts and increase collagen repair while also lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, two age-related diseases linked with excess sugar consumption.[xxiii],[xxiv],[xxv]

3. Aluminum

While aluminum has long been considered an innocuous metal and therefore safe to include in cookware and food preparation processes, researchers have now discovered that prolonged exposure to aluminum may increase and hasten the risk of neurodegeneration and brain-aging disorders, including diseases like Alzheimer’s.[xxvi],[xxvii]

4. Trans-Fatty Acids

There is some research to suggest that a diet low in trans-fatty acids may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.[xxviii] Avoiding these types of synthetic fats may also lower the risk of obesity and Type 2 diabetes, which are also risk factors for age-related dementia.[xxix] Although more research is needed, diets low in these fats (such as the Mediterranean diet) seem to lower dementia risk.[xxx],[xxxi]

5. Tobacco and Alcohol

The use of tobacco products and alcohol have both been linked to premature skin aging.[xxxii],[xxxiii] Other dangerous effects of tobacco use include increased oxidative damage and decreased absorption of antioxidant vitamins, like vitamin C, increasing the risk of age-related diseases.[xxxiv]

Similarly, long-term use of alcohol disrupts cellular aging and negatively impacts telomere length, and some researchers believe that even moderate consumption of alcohol may severely affect biological health as these shortened telomeres are a predictor of increased mortality.[xxxv],[xxxvi]

Additionally, the effects of alcohol seem to worsen with age, since liver enzymes are less able to effectively metabolize alcohol over time.[xxxvii] Finally, heavy alcohol consumption is linked with changes in brain plasticity and cognitive decline, although further research is needed to assess these correlations.[xxxviii]

Properly nourishing your body with the right nutrients and lowering your exposure to the substances listed above is the first step in decreasing your risk of age-related diseases like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and obesity while also improving your quality of life, skin health and gut microbiome.

To view a complete list of the substances that have been researched for their effects on aging, please visit the GreenMedInfo.com research database on aging.


References

[i] Med Hypotheses. 1991 Apr;34(4):300-9.

[ii] J Drugs Dermatol. 2018 Sep 1;17(9):966-969.

[iii] Rejuvenation Res. 2014 Aug;17(4):341-6. doi: 10.1089/rej.2013.1542.

[iv] J Pineal Res. 2005 Nov;39(4):360-6.

[v] Int J Mol Sci. 2019 Mar 12;20(5). pii: E1239. doi: 10.3390/ijms20051239.

[vi] Curr Pharm Des. 2010;16(7):884-92.

[vii] J Natl Med Assoc. 2017 Spring;109(1):9-13. doi: 10.1016/j.jnma.2017.01.005. Epub 2017 Jan 31.

[viii] Geroscience. 2018 Apr;40(2):73-95. doi: 10.1007/s11357-018-0017-z. Epub 2018 Apr 21.

[ix] Theranostics. 2018; 8(20): 5713-5730.

[x] J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;20 Suppl 1:S167-74. doi: 10.3233/JAD-2010-1404.

[xi] Antioxidants (Basel). 2017 Sep; 6(3): 71.

[xii] Antioxidants (Basel). 2017 Sep; 6(3): 71.

[xiii] Cutis. 2005 Feb;75(2 Suppl):5-8; discussion 8-9.

[xiv] J Drugs Dermatol. 2016 Jan;15(1):9-12.

[xv] BMC Complement Altern Med. 2018 Jun 26;18(1):196. doi: 10.1186/s12906-018-2194-9.

[xvi] World J Gastroenterol. 2015 Aug 7; 21(29): 8787-8803.

[xvii] Biomed Res Int. 2017; 2017: 5939818.

[xviii] Int J Pediatr Obes. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2010 Oct 8.

[xix] Front Physiol. 2017; 8: 487.

[xx] Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Dec; 96(6): 1249-1251.

[xxi] Clin Dermatol. 2010 Jul-Aug;28(4):409-11. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2010.03.018.

[xxii] Age (Dordr). 2013 Feb;35(1):189-95. doi: 10.1007/s11357-011-9339-9. Epub 2011 Nov 20.

[xxiii] Biogerontology. 2018; 19(6): 447-459.

[xxiv] Age (Dordr). 2013 Feb; 35(1): 189-195.

[xxv] Nutr Healthy Aging. 2016; 4(1): 31-46.

[xxvi] Toxicology. 2014 Jan 6;315:1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.tox.2013.10.008. Epub 2013 Nov 1.

[xxvii] Environ Health Perspect. 1986 Mar; 65: 363-441.

[xxviii] Nutr Rev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 May 13.

[xxix] Nutr Rev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 May 13.

[xxx] Arch Neurol. 2009 Feb;66(2):216-25. doi: 10.1001/archneurol.2008.536.

[xxxi] Ann Neurol. 2006 Jun;59(6):912-21.

[xxxii] J Dermatol Sci. 2001 Aug;27 Suppl 1:S26-31.

[xxxiii] J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2019 Aug; 12(8): 28-39.

[xxxiv] Immun Ageing. 2008; 5: 10.

[xxxv] Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2019 Nov;236(11):3245-3255. doi: 10.1007/s00213-019-05281-5. Epub 2019 Jun 3.

[xxxvi] Sci Rep. 2019 Feb 5;9(1):1404. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-38904-0.

[xxxvii] Alcohol Res. 2016; 38(1): 115-120.

[xxxviii] Front Neurosci. 2019; 13: 713.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

Eight Reasons to Consume Bee Propolis

© 11th June 2020 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter
Reproduced from original article:
www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/eight-reasons-consume-bee-propolis

Posted on: Saturday, June 6th 2020 at 3:45 pm

Bee propolis, a natural resin sourced from honeybees, hosts numerous health benefits thanks to its antiseptic, antimicrobial, antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we’ve outlined eight of the main benefits of consuming bee propolis

Bee propolis, a kind of “bee glue” or resinous substance used by bees to protect against fungus and seal holes or cracks in the hive, is garnering more attention in the health and wellness community thanks to a growing body of research highlighting its therapeutic benefits.[i],[ii]

Composed mainly of resin and wax, bee propolis is full of phenolic compounds, esters and 12 different kinds of flavonoids that contribute to its anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant properties.[iii] If you’ve never tried bee propolis, here are eight excellent examples of why you should consider adding bee propolis products into your routine and diet:

1. Bee Propolis Protects Against the Common Cold

Research has shown that due to the antimicrobial properties of bee propolis, it may be useful in relieving symptoms and shortening the duration of the common cold.[iv] Additionally, parents may use propolis as a supplement for preventing colds and flu-like illnesses in children, as it has immune-activating properties and has been shown to reduce the likelihood of colds in children.[v],[vi],[vii]

2. Bee Propolis Fights Upper Respiratory Infections in Children and Adults

The antimicrobial effects of propolis have been shown to effectively fight several strains of bacteria in patients with upper respiratory infections.[viii] Researchers believe that bee propolis could be used as a natural antibacterial therapy to prevent upper respiratory infections in both children and adults.[ix]

3. Bee Propolis Has Antifungal Properties

Researchers have studied the antifungal effects of propolis on onychomycosis, a common nail infection caused by fungus that causes nails to weaken and become brittle or ragged.[x],[xi]

Conventional treatment methods for onychomycosis include medications that often cause severe side effects or interact with other medications, causing the patient to stop treatment.[xii] Because researchers have demonstrated the effective topical antifungal properties of bee propolis, many believe that it could be used as a less expensive remedy for onychomycosis without adverse effects.[xiii]

Researchers have also studied the effects of propolis against 40 yeast strains of the Candida fungus, demonstrating that propolis is effective in inhibiting the growth of these common fungi.[xiv] Common candida infections include oral thrush and vaginal yeast infections, both of which have been shown to benefit from propolis-based topical treatments.[xv],[xvi],[xvii]

4. Bee Propolis May Protect Against Cancer

Propolis contains a substance called caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), which activates DNA damage signaling in cancer cells, making it a potent antitumor therapy in the treatment and prevention of cancer.[xviii],[xix]

In fact, some researchers believe propolis may be as effective as chemotherapy or conventional chemopreventative drugs, without the adverse side effects associated with chemotherapy.[xx]

5. Antidiabetic Properties of Bee Propolis

A heterogeneous disease caused by insulin secretion or action defects, diabetes mellitus is one of the more common chronic diseases affecting Americans today.[xxi] In various studies, bee propolis extract effectively reduced hyperglycemic and oxidative stress associated with hyperglycemia and had ameliorating effects on cardiovascular health in diabetic subjects.[xxii],[xxiii]

Royal jelly, a healing secretion of bees intended for their nourishment, also has potent anti-diabetic qualities and significantly lowers blood sugar levels and oxidative stress caused by hyperglycemia.[xxiv]

6. Bee Propolis Offers Neuroprotective Benefits

Propolis has inhibitory effects against neuronal cell death, possibly preventing the onset of several neurodegenerative and ischemic disorders.[xxv] This may be due to propolis’ effects on oxidative stress, which is believed to be the underlying pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.[xxvi],[xxvii]

7. Bee Propolis as a Potential Gastrointestinal Treatment

The cytotoxic and cytostatic effects of CAPE, an ester contained in bee propolis, make it an excellent potential therapy in the treatment and prevention of gastric cancers.[xxviii] Additional gastrointestinal benefits of propolis include treatment and prevention of ulcerative colitis, probably due to its antioxidant, antiulcer and anti-inflammatory properties.[xxix]

8. Bee Propolis for Dermatology and Skin Care

Bee propolis has been studied for its topical effects on a variety of skin conditions, including burn treatment, wound healing, insect bites, UV-induced photodamage, oral infections and sores, and the antibacterial and anti-inflammatory nature of bee propolis makes it a popular ingredient in many natural cosmetic products.[xxx],[xxxi],[xxxii],[xxxiii],[xxxiv]

Propolis has also been tested for its effects on acne. Conventional antibiotic treatments for this follicular skin disease have become less effective due to the rise of antibiotic-resistant strains of Propionibacterium acnes, but researchers have demonstrated that natural antimicrobial extracts such as propolis seem to effectively reduce redness and lessen scarring.[xxxv]

Safety Concerns Associated With Bee Propolis

Oral or topical use of bee propolis can cause allergic reactions, especially in individuals allergic to honey bee or other bee stings or to asthmatic individuals, with allergies presenting as contact dermatitis or oral mucositis.[xxxvi],[xxxvii]

Nevertheless, researchers believe that while there is a chance for allergic reaction and the exact dosage of propolis has yet to be determined, there is vast potential for the use of this natural and promising substance for those without allergies.[xxxviii],[xxxix]

For more information and additional research studies, please visit the GreenMedInfo.com research database on bee propolis and other bee products such as honey and bee venom


References

[i] Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2017; 2017: 1259510.

[ii] J Intercult Ethnopharmacol. 2016 Jun-Aug; 5(3): 308-311.

[iii] Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2017; 2017: 1259510.

[iv] Adv Pharmacol Sci. 2013; 2013: 308249.

[v] Rom J Virol. 1995 Jul-Dec;46(3-4):115-33.

[vi] J Intercult Ethnopharmacol. 2016 Jun-Aug; 5(3): 308-311.

[vii] Am J Chin Med. 2005;33(2):231-40.

[viii] Arzneimittelforschung. 1993 Aug;43(8):921-3.

[ix] J Chemother. 2006 Apr;18(2):164-71.

[x] Version 1. F1000Res. 2019; 8: F1000 Faculty Rev-968.

[xi] Front Microbiol. 2018; 9: 779.

[xii] Front Microbiol. 2018; 9: 779.

[xiii] Front Microbiol. 2018; 9: 779.

[xiv] J Med Food. 2011 Jan-Feb;14(1-2):128-34. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2009.0296. Epub 2010 Dec 4.

[xv] Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015; 2015: 287693.

[xvi] Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2005 May;89(2):127-32.

[xvii] Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013; 2013: 351062.

[xviii] Integr Cancer Ther. 2018 Sep; 17(3): 867-873.

[xix] Folia Histochem Cytobiol. 2012 Apr 24;50(1):25-37. doi: 10.2478/18693.

[xx] Integr Cancer Ther. 2018 Sep;17(3):867-873. doi: 10.1177/1534735417753545. Epub 2018 Feb 2.

[xxi] Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2017; 2017: 5439645.

[xxii] Clin Biochem. 2005 Feb;38(2):191-6.

[xxiii] Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2017; 2017: 5439645.

[xxiv] Masataka Nomura, Naomi Maruo, Yoshito Zamami, Shingo Takatori, Shima Doi, Hiromu Kawasaki. [Effect of long-term treatment with royal jelly on insulin resistance in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats]Yakugaku Zasshi. 2007 Nov ;127(11):1877-82. PMID: 17978564

[xxv] J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Oct 8;56(19):8944-53. doi: 10.1021/jf8014206. Epub 2008 Sep 12.

[xxvi] Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2017; 2017: 7984327.

[xxvii] Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2018; 2018: 7074209.

[xxviii] Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2018; 2018: 2035820.

[xxix] Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2018; 2018: 2035820.

[xxx] Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2016; 2016: 8473937.

[xxxi] Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2017; 2017: 1259510.

[xxxii] Antioxidants (Basel). 2019 May; 8(5): 125.

[xxxiii] Burns Trauma. 2015; 3: 9.

[xxxiv] Molecules. 2020 Jan 28;25(3). pii: E556. doi: 10.3390/molecules25030556.

[xxxv] Clin Pharmacol. 2018; 10: 175-181.

[xxxvi] Drug Saf. 2008;31(5):419-23.

[xxxvii] J Pharm Bioallied Sci. 2011 Oct-Dec; 3(4): 479-495.

[xxxviii] Adv Pharmacol Sci. 2013; 2013: 308249.

[xxxix] Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2017; 2017: 1259510.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

Potential Roles of NAC and Glutathione in COVID-19 Treatment


Reproduced from original article:
https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/05/25/nac-and-glutathione.aspx

Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola      Fact Checked
May 25, 2020

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione may be a useful adjunct in COVID-19 treatment due to the role they play in combating oxidative stress. NAC may also combat the abnormal blood clotting seen in many cases
  • Research has demonstrated that NAC can attenuate symptoms of influenza and improve cell-mediated immunity. For every two people treated with NAC, one will be protected against symptomatic influenza
  • NAC also inhibits viral replication and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), in cells infected with highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, and reduces acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)
  • NAC may protect against coagulation problems associated with COVID-19, as it counteracts hypercoagulation and breaks down blood clots
  • According to a case report, two patients with COVID-19 treated with 2 grams of intravenous glutathione experienced reduced shortness of breath within one hour of use

N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a precursor to reduced glutathione, and both of these play important roles in health and fitness. NAC has a long history of use as a first-aid remedy for acetaminophen (known as paracetamol in Europe) poisoning.

It’s given in cases when you’ve taken an overdose of Tylenol or other acetaminophen products. It neutralizes the toxic effects of the drug by recharging glutathione, thereby preventing liver damage.

NAC and glutathione may also be important in COVID-19, as explained by pulmonologist Dr. Roger Seheult in the MedCram lectures above. The reason for this is because of the role they play in combating oxidative stress, which is a main cause of inflammation and disease in general, and the cytokine storm associated with COVID-19 in particular. NAC may also combat the abnormal blood clotting seen in many cases.

Biochemistry Primer

As explained and illustrated by Seheult, when you add an electron to an oxygen (O2) molecule, you get superoxide (O2), a reactive oxygen species (ROS). When you add another electron (for a total of two electrons), you get hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). An oxygen molecule with three electrons added becomes hydroxyl (O3), and oxygen with four electrons added becomes water (H2O).

Oxygen is the most oxidized form, while water is the most reduced form. Your body has built-in defenses against oxidative stress like1 superoxide dismutase (SOD). SOD converts damaging superoxide into hydrogen peroxide. Another is catalase, which converts hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. A third is glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX).

GSHPX does two things simultaneously. While reducing hydrogen peroxide into water, it also converts the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) into glutathione disulfide (GSSG), which is the oxidized form of glutathione. In other words, as GSHPX turns hydrogen peroxide into harmless water, glutathione becomes oxidized.

gshpx

The oxidized GSSG is then “recharged” or regenerated by NADPH (the reduced form of NADP+), turning it back into GSH (the reduced form of glutathione). NADPH is also converted into NADP+ through an enzyme called GSH reductase.

The reason this is important is because superoxide plays a crucial role in the oxidative stress occurring in the chronic illnesses identified as comorbidities for COVID-19, such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes.

As noted by Seheult, serious COVID-19 infection triggers a perfect storm of superoxide-driven oxidative stress, as SARS-CoV-2 attaches to the ACE2 receptor, triggering angiotensin 2 (AT-2), which stimulates superoxide. Simultaneously, there’s a deficiency of AT-1,7, which inhibits superoxide. So, this deficiency allows superoxide to accumulate further.

SARS-CoV-2 also attracts polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), a type of white blood cell, which also produces superoxide in its efforts to destroy pathogens. All of that superoxide is then converted into other ROS that destroy endothelial cells.

This down-spiral can be inhibited by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which boosts GSSG. As illustrated by Seheult, when you add two GSH molecules and hydrogen peroxide together, you end up with oxidized glutathione and harmless water, thus alleviating the oxidative stress.

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NAC Boosts GSH and Protects Against Influenza

Seheult cites research showing low GSH and oxidative stress are associated with a range of nose, ear and throat conditions, affecting tissues both locally and systemically. The good news is that glutathione can be recharged with NAC, an inexpensive and readily available over-the-counter supplement.

Research2 has in fact demonstrated that NAC can attenuate symptoms of influenza and improve cell-mediated immunity. According to the authors:

“N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an analogue and precursor of reduced glutathione, has been in clinical use for more than 30 yrs as a mucolytic drug. It has also been proposed for and/or used in the therapy and/or prevention of several respiratory diseases and of diseases involving an oxidative stress, in general.

The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of long-term treatment with NAC on influenza and influenza-like episodes. A total of 262 subjects of both sexes … were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind trial … randomized to receive either placebo or NAC tablets (600 mg) twice daily for 6 months.

Patients suffering from chronic respiratory diseases were not eligible, to avoid possible confounding by an effect of NAC on respiratory symptoms. NAC treatment was well tolerated and resulted in a significant decrease in the frequency of influenza-like episodes, severity, and length of time confined to bed.

Both local and systemic symptoms were sharply and significantly reduced in the NAC group. Frequency of seroconversion towards A/H1N1 Singapore 6/86 influenza virus was similar in the two groups, but only 25% of virus-infected subjects under NAC treatment developed a symptomatic form, versus 79% in the placebo group …

Administration of N-acetylcysteine during the winter, thus, appears to provide a significant attenuation of influenza and influenza-like episodes, especially in elderly high-risk individuals. N-acetylcysteine did not prevent A/H1N1 virus influenza infection but significantly reduced the incidence of clinically apparent disease.”

NAC Is a Potent Antiviral in Its Own Right

As noted by Seheult, the number needed to treat (NNT) in that study3 is 0.5, which means for every two people treated with NAC, one will be protected against symptomatic influenza. (Remember, you can be infected with a virus yet not become ill, i.e., symptomatic, if your immune system is strong enough.)

That’s significantly better than influenza vaccines, which have an NNT, or NNV (number needed to vaccinate) of 71,4 meaning 71 people must be vaccinated to prevent a single case of confirmed influenza. It’s even better than vitamin D, which has an NNT of 33.5 (Among those who were severely vitamin D deficient at baseline, taking vitamin D still had an NNT of 4.)

NAC has also been shown to inhibit viral replication and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), in cells infected with highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus.6 According to the authors:

“The antiviral and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of NAC included inhibition of activation of oxidant sensitive pathways including transcription factor NF-kappaB and mitogen activated protein kinase p38 …

NAC inhibits H5N1 replication and H5N1-induced production of pro-inflammatory molecules. Therefore, antioxidants like NAC represent a potential additional treatment option that could be considered in the case of an influenza A virus pandemic.”

NAC in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

NAC has also been shown to reduce acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS),7 which is a serious complication associated with acute lung injury (ALI). One meta-analysis8 of five randomized controlled trials found a significant reduction in intensive care unit (ICU) stays among patients treated with NAC, even though there was no significant difference in short-term mortality risk.

Another earlier study9 found NAC improves ARDS by “increasing intracellular glutathione and extracellular thiol molecules” along with general antioxidant effects. According to this study:

“In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), there is extensive overproduction of free radicals to the extent that endogenous antioxidants are overwhelmed, permitting oxidative cell damage.

The present study examined the benefit of the anti-oxidant compound N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in the management of ARDS by measuring patient’s intracellular glutathione (inside red blood cells) and extracellular (plasma) anti-oxidant defense biomarkers and outcome.

Twenty-seven ARDS patients were recruited from the intensive care unit of a teaching Hospital and randomly divided into two groups. Both groups were managed similarly by regular treatments but 17 patients received NAC 150 mg/kg at the first day that followed by 50 mg/kg/day for three days and 10 patients did not receive NAC.

Treatment by NAC increased extracellular total anti-oxidant power and total thiol molecules and also improved intracellular glutathione and the outcome of the patients. In conclusion, patients with ARDS are in a deficient oxidant-anti-oxidant balance that can get a significant benefit if supplemented with NAC.”

NAC Improves Lung Function

Other studies that have shown NAC eto be beneficial in the treatment of lung-related problems include the following:

A 1994 study10 found NAC enhances recovery from ALI, significantly regressing patients’ lung injury score during the first 10 days of treatment, and significantly reducing the need for ventilation.

After three days of treatment, only 17% of those receiving NAC needed ventilation, compared to 48% in the placebo group. According to the authors:

“Intravenous NAC treatment during 72 h improved systemic oxygenation and reduced the need for ventilatory support in patients presenting with mild-to-moderate acute lung injury subsequent to a variety of underlying diseases.”

A 2018 study11 found NAC reduces oxidative and inflammatory damage in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

Another 2018 study12 found NAC also improves post-operative lung function in patients undergoing liver transplantation.

NAC Protects Against Blood Clots and Stroke

Importantly, with regard to COVID-19, NAC may protect against the coagulation problems associated with this illness. Many COVID-19 patients experience serious blood clots, and NAC counteracts hypercoagulation in the blood as well.13,14,15

As noted in one of these studies,16 “NAC has anticoagulant and platelet-inhibiting properties.” Another study points out that:17

“… diabetes exacerbates stroke-induced brain injury, and that this correlates with brain methylglyoxal (MG)-to-glutathione (GSH) status. Cerebral injury was reversed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC).

Here we tested if the pro-thrombotic phenotype seen in the systemic circulation and brain during diabetes was associated with increased MG-glycation of proteins, and if NAC could reverse this …

NAC treatment partly or completely reversed the effects of diabetes. Collectively, these results show that the diabetic blood and brain become progressively more susceptible to platelet activation and thrombosis.

NAC, given after the establishment of diabetes, may offer protection against the risk for stroke by altering both systemic and vascular prothrombotic responses via enhancing platelet GSH, and GSH-dependent MG elimination, as well as correcting levels of antioxidants such as SOD1 and GPx-1.”

A fourth paper,18 published in 2017, found NAC has potent thrombolytic effects, meaning it breaks down blood clots. The authors concluded that “NAC is an effective and safe alternative to currently available antithrombotic agents to restore vessel patency after arterial occlusion.” (Restoring vessel patency means the blood vessel is now unobstructed so that blood can flow freely.)

Seheult cites two additional papers19,20 showing the same thing. As noted by Seheult, many COVID-19 cases have blood clots in addition to excessive oxidative stress, and NAC addresses both of these problems.

NAC for COVID-19

Last but not least, a report21 reviewing the evidence for using NAC in the treatment of COVID-19 was published April 14, 2020, by The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine at the University of Oxford.

This report focuses on acute respiratory disorders, and we now know that COVID-19 is not just a respiratory disorder but also a blood disorder. This is a significant shortcoming of this report, as there’s significant evidence that NAC can break down the blood clots responsible for the hypoxia (cellular deprivation of oxygen) in COVID-19.

May 5, 2020, a trial was posted to ClinicalTrials.gov, for the study of NAC in patients with COVID-19, sponsored by the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.22 The study aims to enroll 86 patients with severe or critical illness to investigate whether NAC, in addition to other supportive treatments, can reduce ICU stays and prevent the need for mechanical ventilation. Here, they are giving 6 grams (6,000 milligrams) of NAC a day for up to three weeks.

Seheult’s hypothesis for why NAC may be useful in COVID-19 treatment can be summarized as follows:

SARS-CoV-2 attaches to and reduces the ACE2 receptor, which causes AT-2 to increase and AT-1,7 to decrease. This in turn increases damaging superoxide that causes oxidative stress and endothelial cell dysfunction.

This then increases von Willebrand factor from the endothelial space, causing thrombosis (blood clots), and it is this thrombosis that appears to cause the hypoxia in the lungs. NAC — which recharges glutathione — not only reduces superoxide (oxidative stress) but also appears to reduce von Willebrand factors that form blood clots.

Glutathione for COVID-19

In the second MedCram video (second in the playlist), Seheult reviews the blood clotting aspects of COVID-19. He also discusses the potential effectiveness of simply taking glutathione, opposed to its precursor, NAC.

A recent case report23 — which simply reviews one or more medical cases and is not an actual study — reports that two patients with COVID-19 and a history of Lyme disease (coinfection) treated with 2 grams of intravenous glutathione “improved their dyspnea within one hour of use.” Dyspnea is the medical term for shortness of breath. According to the authors:

“Oral and IV glutathione, glutathione precursors (N-acetyl-cysteine) and alpha lipoic acid may represent a novel treatment approach for blocking NF-κB and addressing ‘cytokine storm syndrome’ and respiratory distress in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia.”

He also cites a Russian paper24 stating that glutathione deficiency may be “the most likely cause of serious manifestation and death” in COVID-19 patients. The paper, which is a preprint and has not yet undergone peer review, presents a hypothesis “based on an exhaustive literature analysis and own observations.” According to the author:25

“The major risk factors established for severe COVID-19 infection and relative glutathione deficiency found in COVID-19-infected patients with moderate-to-severe illness have converged me to two very important conclusions:

(1) oxidative stress contributes to hyper-inflammation of the lung leading to adverse disease outcomes such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiorgan failure and death;

(2) poor antioxidant defense due to endogenous glutathione deficiency as a result of decreased biosynthesis and/or increased depletion of GSH is the most probable cause of increased oxidative damage of the lung, regardless which of the factors aging, chronic disease comorbidity, smoking or some others were responsible for this deficit.

The hypothesis provides novel insights into the etiology and mechanisms responsible for serious manifestations of COVID-19 infection and justifies promising opportunities for effective treatment and prevention of the illness through glutathione recovering with N-acetylcysteine and reduced glutathione.”

As noted by Seheult, we still do not have any trials demonstrating that NAC will benefit COVID-19 patients specifically, “but if we connect the dots, it looks promising.” What’s more, NAC is very safe and many studies have shown there are no serious adverse effects associated with its use.

The same can be said for glutathione. Seheult points out it would be interesting to see what the effect might be using a combination of both glutathione and NAC. Overall, the more we learn about this disease, the more we realize there may be simple and inexpensive ways to treat this perplexing illness, and NAC in particular looks like a good candidate for consideration.

Of course, both also have many other important health benefits. To learn more, see “Glutathione and NAC Play Crucial Roles in Health and Fitness,” and “The Many Benefits of NAC — One of the Most Important Supplements You’ve Likely Never Heard Of.”

The benefits of glutathione for IBS are remarkable

Reproduced from original article:
https://www.naturalhealth365.com/glutathione-inflammation-3412.html

| May 23, 2020

glutathione-detox(NaturalHealth365) Although researchers believe that many different factors contribute to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammation continues to get more recognition as a potential cause of the condition. Many patients who have IBS deal with low-grade inflammation and scientists continue to try to understand why.  One substance, glutathione shows great promise in helping people with IBS.

Research hasn’t completely uncovered the answer to this question. However, since we know there’s a link between inflammation and IBS, then it’s a good idea to explore the use of antioxidants that combat inflammation. Emerging evidence shows the benefits of glutathione – known as the most important intracellular antioxidant – for reducing inflammation and relieving IB symptoms.

Powerful antioxidant glutathione combats inflammation associated with IBS

Although multiple factors may contribute to IBS, inflammation is becoming more recognized as a possible cause. Even though inflammation levels are generally low-grade, it still can result in intestinal damage that results in dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract.

Glutathione is an essential antioxidant that plays a critical role within the body. Researchers have become more interested in the use of glutathione as an IBS treatment because research shows how effective it is at reducing inflammation. It’s helped reduce symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and it may be just as useful for individuals who have IBS.

One study showed that in patients who had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), intestinal glutathione synthesis was impaired. This led researchers to believe that therapeutic intervention with glutathione may help. Another study that involved the treatment of IBD with another well-known antioxidant called N-acetylcysteine resulted in an increase in glutathione, which was believed to have contributed to the positive effects of this therapy.

Since glutathione happens to be the most abundant antioxidant within your body, it will likely have similar effects on inflammation as other antioxidants like quercetin and curcumin.

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This “master antioxidant” looks like a promising way to help heal the body

Many patients who deal with IBS are susceptible to side effects that come with conventional (pharmaceuticals) “remedies.”  However, the use of glutathione in humans has an excellent safety history.

Truthfully, there have been very few side effects (if any) experienced, and side effects that have been reported are usually extremely mild.  So, for anyone concerned about trying a new supplement, glutathione is certainly a wise choice offering a great deal of benefits.

While there’s still not a significant amount of specific research surrounding the use of glutathione for IBS, a good look at the literature about this antioxidant indicates it’s a worthwhile, natural option for patients suffering with inflammatory issues.

Early research has shown it plays a crucial role in reducing inflammation and it is being looked at as a potential therapy for IBD patients.  Ultimately, more scientific research is always welcome, but the evidence is clear that with the right nutrition – you can naturally heal the body.

Take action today: Work with a good integrative healthcare provider that can help guide you.  Foods to avoid include, alcohol, artificial sweeteners, fried or processed foods, gluten, GMOs and conventional dairy products.

In terms of smart food choices: Eat small amounts of lean (grass fed) meats, eggs (pasture-raised), cooked greens like, kale and collard greens, sprouted walnuts and chia seeds.  The main message here is to eat (only) real food – organic, as much as possible.  Drink clean (purified) water and take nutritional supplements (as needed) to help you in the healing process.

Sources for this article include:

FoundationalMedicineReview.com
BMJ.com

How to Get Rid of Bags Under Eyes


Reproduced from original article:
https://articles.mercola.com/how-to-get-rid-bags-under-eyes.aspx

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Under eye bags may be reduced by moisturizing your face, sleeping on your back, getting enough sleep, avoiding smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke, adding an extra pillow below your head when sleeping, avoiding rubbing your eyes and treating your allergies
  • Diet changes such as drinking enough water, avoiding salty food, reducing alcohol intake and consuming vitamin C- and retinol-rich foods may also help get rid of bags under eyes
  • Easy home remedies that may help include applying cucumber, avocado, cold compress, egg whites, potato, tomato, lemon juice or caffeinated tea over the affected areas

Periorbital hyperchromia, or dark circles under the eyes, is a common dermatological condition that can affect a person’s self-confidence because it makes them appear tired.[1 It’s a normal thing to happen, though, since this is a physical change that takes effect when you age.2

Also known as periorbital hyperpigmentation, periorbital melanosis and dark circles, under-eye bags may appear as the lower eyelid’s bluish discoloration (vascular type) or brownish to black hyperpigmentation (constitutional type).3 The eyelid skin is the thinnest of all body parts, particularly the lower medial eyelid, which has the lowest dermal to epidermal ratio.4 This is where fat accumulates through time, resulting in the development of bags under the eyes.5

What Causes Bags Under Your Eyes?

Bags under your eyes aren’t always caused by getting too little sleep at night, contrary to what many people believe. They can be caused by factors that differ from one person to another. According to a 2007 study:6

“DC (dark circles) are caused by multiple etiologic factors that include dermal melanin deposition, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation secondary to atopic or allergic contact dermatitis, periorbital edema, superficial location of vasculature and shadowing due to skin laxity.”

Puffiness and bags under the eyes that appear in the morning may be caused by your sleeping position. Sleeping only on one side places pressure on the blood vessels under your eyes. The pool of blood that accumulates in this area makes the skin appear darker.7 According to Medical News Today, buildup of excess fluid and weakened muscles may cause dark bags under the eyes as well.8

Stress may also contribute to the appearance of dark circles. In Chinese medicine, having puffy eyes can be a symptom of water or kidney imbalance, while dark bags under the eyes may imply allergies.9

Is It Safe to Use Under-Eye Bags Cream?

According to a Reader’s Digest article, most eye creams in the market are a waste of money because they basically contain the same ingredients as facial moisturizers. They’re usually water-based to ensure that the skin would be hydrated.10

If you intend to use an eye cream, choose products that contain organic ingredients such as shea butter, jojoba oil, acai oil, green tea leaf extract and chamomile flower extract to help moisturize your skin and to ensure safety from harmful chemicals. For more convenient and easy-to-follow methods, I have provided a list of remedies below.

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How to Get Rid of Bags Under the Eyes

Conventional treatments for under-eye bags include topical medications, surgery, chemical peels and laser treatments.11 However, I advise you to turn to safer and more convenient noninvasive methods to help diminish the bags under your eyes.

Although it is considered more of a cosmetic concern than a medical one,12 you can improve your appearance by getting rid of the bags under your eyes through these methods.

5 Topical Remedies for Under-Eye Bags

Moisturize — Wrinkles and bags under the eyes become more visible when your skin is dry.13 Keep your skin well-moisturized, especially around the eyes, by using all-natural moisturizers such as pure emu oil and pure coconut oil.

Use Brazilian ginseng — A 2009 study found that topically applying a serum sample containing Brazilian ginseng twice a day may help reduce the intensity of dark circles around the eyes.14

Opt for eye creams with coffee extracts — A 2013 study found that caffeine has antioxidant properties that may work as a sunscreen. These polyphenol compounds protect the skin from UVB radiation, which may help prevent rapid skin aging.15

A 2018 study also found that skin care products with caffeine may help reduce under-eye bags caused by dilatation of blood vessels.16

Use a safe sunscreen and wear sunglasses — Though sun exposure is vital in achieving optimal health, you must consider factors such as weather conditions, season and time of the day when you stay under the sun to avoid photodamage and the appearance of wrinkles.

According to a 2013 study, using a broad spectrum sunscreen and wearing UV-coated sunglasses may help reduce bags under the eyes.17 However, in choosing a sunscreen, make sure that it doesn’t contain oxybenzone, synthetic fragrances or retinyl palmitate; your safest choice is a lotion or cream with zinc oxide. You may also wear a wide-brimmed hat or a cap to protect your face and eyes.

Gently remove your makeup — Excessively scrubbing your face may break your blood vessels, which may worsen the bags under your eyes.18 Avoid this by gently swiping some mild makeup remover over your eyes (coconut oil is a good option) and leaving it on your face for a minute before washing it off.

5 Diet Changes May Help Get Rid of Bags Under Your Eyes

Drink enough water — Staying hydrated will help restore your skin’s moisture and may help eliminate toxins from it.

Avoid salty food — Sodium contributes to fluid retention,19 which causes bags under eyes. Cutting down on your salt intake at night is one way to reduce bags under eyes and puffiness in the morning.20

Add retinol-rich food to your diet — Retinol or vitamin A helps prevent further thinning of the skin.21 Nourish the skin under your eyes by adding food rich in retinol such as grass fed beef liver, cheddar cheese, pasture-raised chicken giblets, turkey liver, grass fed butter and organic, pastured eggs to your diet.

Reduce or avoid alcohol intake — Alcohol is one of the fluids that can dehydrate your body, including the skin under the eyes. This thin area may likely sink and form a bag.22 If you do imbibe in alcohol, be sure to balance it with at least 8 cups of water throughout the day.

Consume vitamin C-rich food — A 2009 study found that vitamin C from sodium ascorbate lotion may help thicken the skin of the lower eyelids. The results showed that dark coloration is significantly diminished when the dermis has thickened.23

Reduce the appearance of bags under your eyes by adding foods rich in vitamin C such mangopapaya, pineapple, watermelon, broccoli, tomatoes, green and red bell peppers, strawberries and winter squash to your diet.24

6 Lifestyle Changes That May Help Eliminate Under-Eye Bags

If you want to know how to get rid of bags under eyes fast, here are additional lifestyle changes you should follow today:

Sleep on your back — Sleeping on one side or on your belly contributes to the buildup of blood and fluid to the face. Try to sleep on your back to avoid morning face puffiness due to fluid accumulation.25

Add an extra pillow below your head — Elevate your head when you sleep to avoid fluid buildup around your eyes.26

Avoid smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke — Besides chemical irritation, smoking may cause skin damage and rapid aging, especially around the mouth and eyes. Preventing exposure to tobacco smoke is one of the ways you can avoid or remove bags under eyes.27

Get enough sleep — One of WebMD’s recommended ways on getting rid of under-eye bags is ensuring you get high-quality sleep at night. To help prevent your skin from sagging, aim for seven to nine hours of sleep to give your skin more time to produce collagen.28

Deal with your allergies — According to a Sage Journals study, dark bags under the eyes may be caused by nasal allergies in children. The authors note:

“Prolonged and persistent allergic edema of the mucous membranes of the nasal cavities produces pressure effects on the veins, interfering with their normal drainage. Thus the discoloration under the eyes develops from obstruction and slowing of the normal drainage of the lower venous marginal arcades and palpebral veins.”

Commonly known as allergic shiners,29 these may be mitigated by using natural antihistamines such as butterbur, vitamin C and green tea.

Avoid rubbing your eyes — Frequent rubbing of the eyes may aggravate the appearance of dark circles, according to a study published in 2014.30 Doing this may break the blood vessels in your eyelids and create a blood buildup that causes the discoloration of the lower eyelids.31

Eliminate Bags Under Your Eyes With These 8 Home Remedies

If you’re looking for an easy home remedy for the bags under your eyes, here are different things that you may use at home:

Cucumber — Cucumber is one of the most popular natural remedies for bags under eyes as it contains anti-inflammatory properties that may help reduce puffiness. Simply put two slices of chilled cucumbers over your eyes for about 25 minutes.32

Cold spoon —One of the most convenient under-eye bags treatments is placing a cold spoon over your lower eyelids to cool down your blood vessels.33

Cold compress — Placing a cold compress over the eyes significantly reduces the swelling of blood vessels. Simply place a damp, ice-cold face towel over your eyes for 15 minutes to do this.34

Egg whites — Times of India suggests applying beaten egg whites around the eye area as a bags-under-eyes remedy. Leaving the egg whites on your skin for 20 minutes may help tighten it35 as they contain astringent properties.36

Potato or tomato — To lighten the dark circles under your eyes, use a cotton ball soaked in potato extract or fresh tomato juice. Squeeze out the excess and then place it over your under-eye skin for 10 minutes. Rinse after.

Avocado — This fruit has emollient properties that make it a good moisturizer for your skin. You may either directly place avocado slices over your eyes or make a mask mixed with a few drops of almond oil.

Lemon juice — With its natural bleaching properties, lemon juice may be used to help reduce the discoloration of the bags under your eyes. Remember to dilute it in water before applying the mixture to your under-eye skin to prevent irritation.37

Caffeinated tea — Cold tea bags are known to help slow down skin aging because of their antioxidant properties.38 If you’ve got spare tea bags, soak them first in warm water and then place inside the refrigerator to chill. Afterward, place the tea bags over your eyes for five minutes.39

Remember that these methods for eliminating under-eye bags using home remedies may or may not work for you as these marks are caused by different factors, as found by a 2014 study involving 200 patients with different forms of periorbital hyperpigmentation.40 Try a few and see which ones work best for you.

Essential Oils for Under-Eye Bags

In aromatherapy, essential oils are used to help boost a person’s mind, body and spirit. They may be diluted in carrier oil to be massaged on the skin, used with a diffuser or infused with hot water and inhaled via the steam.41 Aside from their therapeutic purposes, some essential oils such as lavender and Roman chamomile may help reduce puffiness and bags under the eyes because they contain anti-inflammatory properties.

Here’s a recipe for helping you reduce those dark circles using essential oils:42

Ingredients:

1 drop chamomile essential oil

1 drop lavender essential oil

30 ml aloe vera gel, lotion or cream

Procedure:

1.Mix the essential oils with aloe vera gel.

2.Cleanse your face then pat it dry.

3.Take a small amount from the mixture then gently apply it to the skin around your eyes.

Alternatively, cotton balls soaked in witch hazel oil may also be placed over your eyelids for 20 minutes to reduce the dark circles.43 Witch hazel has moisturizing and astringent properties that may tighten and hydrate the skin under the eyes.

Before doing any of these, see how your skin responds by testing the various topical ingredients on a small area of your forearm. Be sure to consult your health care provider or a professional aromatherapist if you intend to use essential oils, as some oils may contain compounds that may not be suitable for your skin.44

Is There a Need for an Under-Eye Bags Surgery?

As mentioned, having noticeable bags under the eyes is not a medical concern, but an aesthetic one that doesn’t imply a disease or a health-threatening condition.45 If the saggy skin obstructs your peripheral vision, an under-eye bags surgery or blepharoplasty could be done. This procedure gets rid of the excess tissue in your eyelids46 through an incision.

After removing the excess fat, the skin would then be stitched together.47 If your condition calls for a surgery, opt for transconjunctival than transcutaneous blepharoplasty so that the scar would not be visible.48

Having to remove bags under eyes by means of surgery may pose benefits and risks, so be sure to consult an expert before intending to undergo one.

Before Trying Home Remedies, Know the Underlying Cause First

Under-eye bags may be common, but data on how this condition develops is scarce.49 Many of the home remedies mentioned above may be easy to follow, but proper guidance from your health care provider is necessary for those to take effect. Make sure that you know the cause of your under-eye bags so that you’ll know which method is right for your condition.

Aging and genetics are two common causes of under-eye bags that you cannot control, so having a better lifestyle and attending to your skin care needs may be beneficial in reducing the appearance of these marks.

When you feel like the bags have become itchy, painful or severe, or if they blur or obstruct your vision, it’s best to visit your doctor immediately to address the problem and avoid further complications.50

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Bags Under-Eye Bags

Q: How do I get rid of dark circles and bags under my eyes?

A: Home remedies that may help reduce bags under your eyes include moisturizing your skin, using sunscreen, wearing sunglasses, caps or hats, avoiding salty foods, adding foods rich in retinol and vitamin C to your diet, and placing tea bags, potato peel, cucumber slices or cold spoons over your eyes.

Q: How do you fix bags under your eyes?

A: Having the thinnest skin of all body parts, eyelids and the skin around them are likely to develop damage as you age. Photodamage from exposure to UV rays may cause bags under the eyes. Some ways to help reduce this are topical antioxidant usage and sunscreen application.51

Q: Do eye creams really work?

A: Eye creams actually have the same formulation as facial moisturizers.52 When buying eye creams, look for organic ingredients such as shea butter, jojoba oil, acai oil, green tea leaf extract and chamomile flower extract to ensure safety from potential chemicals.

– Sources and References

High-dose glutathione shows promise in addressing respiratory distress in patients with COVID-19

Reproduced from original article:
www.naturalhealth365.com/glutathione-respiratory-distress-3406.html

glutathione-therapy(NaturalHealth365) In some areas across the country, like New York City, even “suspected cases” of COVID-19 aren’t confirmed because of a lack of testing.  Unfortunately, this viral infection can become life-threatening as a result of what’s known as “cytokine storm syndrome.”  The end result can be pneumonia and other complications like acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).  But, as you’ll soon see, glutathione has proven to be a lifesaving antioxidant.

To date, no published “cure” has been found to control the respiratory symptoms and inflammation associated with the virus adequately, other than assisted ventilation and oxygen therapy. However, a new study based upon two patients with dyspnea secondary to coronavirus pneumonia found that glutathione shows significant promise in addressing respiratory distress.

Glutathione to the rescue: New York mom saved when medical-student son takes action

A New York mom – Josephine Bruzzese – was diagnosed with pneumonia but sent home from the hospital as a suspected COVID-19 case because there were no coronavirus tests currently available. She was given hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin, and while some symptoms improved, she still had difficulty breathing. In fact, symptoms were so severe that she’d nearly pass out every time she stood up due to shortness of breath.

Josephine’s son, James Bruzzese, is a second-year student at CUNY School of Medicine, called a Lyme Disease specialist the family already knew – Dr. Richard Horowitz.  After James gave him the rundown, Dr. Horowitz suggested that they try giving Josephine glutathione, which is an antioxidant produced by your liver that helps reduce inflammation.

When a viral infection causes a significant amount of inflammation, the body doesn’t have enough of the antioxidant glutathione to keep lung tissue protected.

After a single 2,000mg dose of glutathione, the family saw Josephine improve in just an hour. She was able to get up, take a shower, and continued taking the treatment for five days with no relapse.

The use of all-natural substances show great promise in helping to heal the body

Both James and Dr. Horowitz coauthored a study on treating James’ mother and an additional Manhattan man with glutathione. The second patient who is in his 50s reported that he was given an intravenous infusion of glutathione and saw improvement in breathing symptoms within a half hour of the dose.

According to the study, it’s believed that oral and IV glutathione work to help address the “cytokine storm syndrome” that leads to respiratory distress in patients who have COVID-19 pneumonia.  They also noticed that zinc and vitamin C also may be helpful in reducing the body’s inflammatory response and reducing the production of cytokines.

Although they call for additional randomized controlled trials to further study these novel therapies, the success with the treatment is compelling. It’s additional proof that taking supplements like glutathione, zinc, and vitamin C are worthwhile as the world continues fighting this COVID-19 pandemic.

Stay tuned to NaturalHealth365, because we will have much more news about this topic soon!

Sources for this article include:

NYPost.com
ScienceDirect.com

Woman believes “soda” saved her family from the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic

Reproduced from original article:
www.naturalhealth365.com/baking-soda-spanish-flu-3403.html
by:  | May 15, 2020

baking-soda(NaturalHealth365) As COVID-19 continues to dominate the news cycle, causing tens of thousands of fatalities and devastating economies around the world, researchers are re-examining the Spanish flu outbreak of 1918 in hopes of gaining perspective and insight. The deadliest pandemic in the history of mankind, the Spanish flu infected a staggering 500 million people worldwide and claimed the lives of at least 50 million people.  Now, in an important YouTube interviewan elderly survivor of the Spanish flu credits baking soda with saving her entire family.

Also known as sodium bicarbonate, baking soda has been called an “almost perfect medicine” by noted author and physician Dr. Mark Sircus – and has been used for decades to safely alleviate a variety of conditions, including heartburn, rheumatoid arthritis and rashes. And – particularly significant in the age of COVID-19 – natural health experts believe it may help reduce the ability of colds, influenza and coronaviruses to spread.

Centenarian reveals that baking soda was the secret of her family’s survival

In an interview recorded in 2007 by the Alabama Department of Public Health, Mrs. Edna Register Boone of Mobile Alabama shares a story of survival.

The remarkably alert 100-year-old recalls being a member of the only unaffected family in the small rural community of Madrid in southern Alabama – at a time when the Spanish flu pandemic was taking a terrible toll on neighbors and friends.

As the only family to be spared the effects of the deadly pandemic, the Boones became “automatic nurses” to their neighbors. Mrs. Boone, who was ten years old at the time, vividly remembers carrying jars of soup to afflicted neighbors. She also recalls that her father tended a sweet potato patch and shared the harvest with the community.

Mrs. Boone spoke movingly of entire families dying from the virus, of neighbors having to bury each other, and of the desperate efforts of the small town’s lone, overwhelmed doctor.  Yet, there was one silver lining. “It brought our little town closer,” she recalled.

And, there was never any doubt as to what was required.  “I knew I had to do my part,” Mrs. Boone reminisced.

Some of the precautions taken by young Edna Boone are hauntingly familiar today. She provided “contactless” delivery by leaving the soup on neighbors’ front porches and waiting for them to retrieve it – and faithfully wore a gauze mask when out in the community.

The whole time, Mrs. Boone remembers, she felt her family was being “protected” against the Spanish flu.  The family’s secret?

At her mother’s insistence, Edna and her brothers took half a teaspoon of baking soda in a glass of water every day before breakfast.  “I’ve often thought that’s what saved us,” she said, noting that her mother believed the mixture would “neutralize the system.”

Watch this video (below) and listen to Eden tell her story:

Historical fact: The “Spanish flu” killed more Americans than combat in World War I

The flu struck in the midst of World War I, when military bases around the world were packed with hundreds of thousands of young men. Due to an unseasonably cold winter, the men were moved into overcrowded barracks to keep warm, undoubtedly exacerbating he spread of the virus.

The first wave of the illness was reported in Huntsville, Alabama in late September of 1918, and it spread at lightning speed.  Within three weeks, there were 25,000 cases in the state.

Unlike COVID-19, which is a type of coronavirus, the Spanish flu (H1N1) was a true influenza. Also unlike COVID-19, H1N1 struck down many young, healthy people in the prime of their lives, while also infecting the elderly and the very young.

Incidentally, medical historians note that the name “Spanish flu” is a misnomer. The disease did not begin in Spain, although it did ravage that country, among others. Spain was not subject to wartime news blackouts (as other European countries were) and actively reported on the pandemic – an act of responsible journalism that led to the inaccurate label.

Studies: Baking soda raises alkalinity and discourages viral replication in laboratory studies

In 1918, Edward R. Hays, M.D., a physician with the U.S. Public Health Service, utilized bicarbonate of soda against the Spanish flu. An early proponent of baking soda therapy, Dr. Hays believed in its power to alkalize the body, increase resistance to disease and fight colds and influenza.

“In many, many instances within 36 hours the symptoms would have entirely abated,” declared Dr. Hays.

Recent studies have shown that certain viruses are pH-dependent, and are at maximum infection rate under acidic conditions, such as pH 6.0.  On the other hand, raising alkalinity up to pH 8.0 can deactivate them.

Although research has been limited to laboratory and cellular studies, some scientists feel this discovery could have clinical applications.  As a non-toxic, cheap, and easily-accessible remedy, baking soda may have potential as a precautionary measure against viral infection.

Diminish severity of colds and flu with scheduled baking soda dosing

To follow the recommendations endorsed by Dr. Hays, take a half teaspoon of sodium bicarbonate in a glass of cool water six times at regular intervals during the first day.  Follow this with four dosages during the second day, and two during the third day.

Then, take once in the morning every day thereafter until symptoms are gone.

Don’t hesitate to seek medical advice if ill, and don’t use baking soda to prevent or treat viral infection – or any other medical condition – without consulting with your integrative healthcare provider.  It is especially important to talk to your doctor if you have high blood pressure, as baking soda is high in sodium.

Edna Boone, who passed away in 2011 at the age of 104, leaves us with a warning that rings eerily true today.  Her advice? “Be aware, it could happen again.”

Sources for this article include:

YouTube.com
WBHM.org
NaturalHealth365.com