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Light Exposure at Night Can Destroy Your Thyroid


Reproduced from original article:
https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2021/02/24/light-exposure-at-night-can-destroy-your-thyroid.aspx

Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola      Fact Checked      February 24, 2021
light exposure at night disrupts circadian rhythms

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Exposure to outdoor light at night, which disrupts circadian rhythms, may increase the risk of thyroid cancer
  • Those in the highest quintile of nighttime light exposure had a 55% increased risk of thyroid cancer compared to those in the lowest quintile
  • One way circadian disruption may be linked to thyroid cancer is by inducing insulin resistance
  • Light exposure at night also causes sleep trouble, and chronic sleep deprivation is linked to disruption of rhythmic thyroid stimulating hormone secretions, which is associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer

Exposure to light at night is a recent phenomenon that increased dramatically after the invention of electric lighting. Human bodies have not entirely adjusted to this change, and still run on a 24-hour cycle, or circadian rhythm, which includes regular cycles of light and dark.

When you’re exposed to light at night — a time when your body expects it to be dark — physiological changes occur. Inside the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of your brain, which is part of your hypothalamus, resides your master biological clock. Based on signals of light and darkness, your SCN tells your pineal gland when it’s time to secrete melatonin — promoting sleep — and when to turn it off.

Exposure to light leads to advances or delays in your circadian rhythm, known as phase shifts. Typically, exposure to light early in the morning causes a phase advance, which leads to earlier waking. Light exposure at bedtime will lead to a phase delay, or later wakening.

Nighttime exposure to light inhibits the secretion of melatonin, which can cause circadian disruptions that play a role in cancer.1 In fact, it’s previously been shown that higher exposure to outdoor light at night may increase the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer,2 and emerging evidence suggests light at night may increase thyroid cancer, too.3

Light at Night Increases Thyroid Cancer Risk

It’s believed that both breast cancer and thyroid cancer “share a common hormone‐dependent etiology,” while thyroid function is also regulated by circadian rhythm. These two factors led researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health to evaluate whether exposure to light at night plays a role in the incidence of thyroid cancer.

The study followed 464,371 participants in the National Institutes of Health-American Association of Retired Persons Diet and Health Study for an average of 12.8 years.4 Satellite data was used to estimate nighttime light exposure, which was then linked to residential addresses, while thyroid cancer cases were followed via state cancer registries.

Adjustments were also made for other contributors to thyroid cancer risk, including sociodemographic, lifestyle and environmental factors. A positive association was found between light exposure at night and thyroid cancer risk, with those in the highest quintile of nighttime light exposure having a 55% increased risk of thyroid cancer compared to those in the lowest quintile.

“The association was primarily driven by papillary thyroid cancer and was stronger in women,” the researchers noted. “In women, the association was stronger for localized cancer, whereas in men, the association was stronger for a more advanced stage. Results were consistent across different tumor sizes.”5

The study is observational and therefore doesn’t prove causality, however the findings suggest additional research is warranted. Study author Qian Xiao, Ph.D. said in a news release:6

“[W]e don’t know if higher levels of outdoor light at night lead to an elevated risk for thyroid cancer; however, given the well-established evidence supporting a role of light exposure at night and circadian disruption, we hope our study will motivate researchers to further examine the relationship between light at night and cancer, and other diseases.”

Click here to learn more

Strong Link Between Thyroid Cancer and Circadian Disruption

Thyroid cancer is the most common cancer of the endocrine system, and rates have increased significantly in the last few decades.7 Insulin resistance is one of the most significant, and modifiable, risk factors,8 but increasing attention is also being given to environmental factors like circadian clock disruption.

Your body’s 24-hour circadian clock regulates many physiological functions — endocrine rhythms among them. Writing in the journal Cancers, Italian researchers suggested that one way circadian disruption may be linked to thyroid cancer is by inducing insulin resistance:9

“Disruption of the circadian timing system caused by circadian misalignment such as shift work, chronic jet lag, high fat intake, inappropriate eating times, and abnormal sleep patterns could be responsible of insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases and several types of cancers, including TC [thyroid cancer].

Conversely, proper coordination of circadian behavior and sleep homeostasis may improve several conditions including insulin resistance and overall metabolic fitness.

The molecular mechanisms linking circadian clock disruption and TC are still unknown but could be, at least in part, insulin resistance. Indeed, this metabolic alteration is associated with a well-known risk factor for TC i.e., hyperthyrotropinemia, which, in turn, has also been associated to sleep disturbances.”

They also pointed out a number of mechanisms that occur via circadian disruption that could contribute to thyroid disorders. Among them:10

  • Alterations in the rhythmicity of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) secretion
  • Disruptions to hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis function
  • Modifications in genes controlling the cell cycle, apoptosis, DNA damage, inflammation and immune response

Strong changes in the expression of variants of various “clock” genes, including PER2–3, CRYs, BMAL1, REV-ERBs and RORs, have also been found on the transformation of thyroid nodules into cancer, and have even been suggested as biomarkers for use with thyroid nodules that could potentially be predictive of thyroid cancer.11

Clock genes are known to control rhythms that affect physiology and behavior,12 and may also be involved in cancer. Indeed, researchers wrote in Genome Medicine while exploring the many ties between circadian rhythms and disease, “Epidemiological studies have linked circadian disruption to increased cancer susceptibility in all key organ systems.”13

Light Exposure, Sleep Deprivation and Cancer

It’s more difficult to sleep well if you’re exposed to light at night, and the resulting sleep deprivation may also increase cancer risk. An association has been found between insomnia and thyroid cancer, for instance,14 with women with insomnia having a 44% increased risk of thyroid cancer compared to those without. Sleep deprivation is also linked to higher thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration, which in turn is linked to thyroid cancer.15

Further, in a study involving 1,654 adults from the Penn State Adult Cohort, those who slept less than six hours and had cardiometabolic risk factors (high blood pressure, elevated glucose or Type 2 diabetes) had an increased risk of dying from cancer, by 2.92 times.16

In relation to thyroid cancer, specifically, chronic sleep deprivation is linked to disruption of rhythmic thyroid stimulating hormone secretions, which is associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer. Researchers continued in Cancers:17

“Furthermore, disruption of circadian rhythm has been linked to alterations in gene-related apoptosis, DNA damage, cell cycle, and stemness, and thereby to carcinogenesis … In light of this evidence, it is biologically plausible that circadian clock alterations could represent a potential risk factor of developing TC. However, so far, no epidemiologic study has been directly addressed in this relationship.”

Disrupted sleep also wreaks havoc on your metabolic health, which could indirectly increase thyroid cancer risk. Irregular sleep patterns increase the risk of metabolic syndrome by 23% for each one hour of sleep difference, such as going to bed earlier or later than usual; chronic one-hour loss increases the risk by 27%.18

Metabolic syndrome is characterized by three or more of these factors: a large waist circumference, high blood pressure, insulin resistance and/or high blood sugar, low high-density lipoproteins and high triglycerides. Since insulin resistance and related metabolic disorders are linked to thyroid cancer, this is another way that light exposure at night plays a role. Researchers noted:19

“Based on these observations, it is reasonable to expect that improving insulin resistance through synchronization of circadian rhythm or chronotherapy in conjunction with a healthy diet, physical activity and conventional anti-cancer therapies, could exert beneficial effects on prevention and treatment of TCs developed in insulin resistant patients with disrupted circadian rhythms.”

It’s likely that sleep disturbances induced by exposure to light at night may contribute to cancer via multiple mechanisms, including a suppression of immune function by disrupting circadian rhythms, reduced production of melatonin and promotion of inflammation.20

Light Pollution Could Lead to Dire Health Outcomes

Chris Kresser, an acupuncturist, licensed integrative medicine clinician and co-director of the California Center for Functional Medicine, is among those who have sounded an alarm over the health risks of exposure to light at night and light pollution.

Most of your endocrine hormones, including not only thyroid hormones but also growth hormone, cortisol, leptin, melatonin and insulin, have a daily rhythm that, when disrupted, may interfere with how your body functions.

According to Kresser, the most potent regulator of your circadian rhythm is exposure to light at the proper times and intensities — and vice versa, in that light pollution is a potent disruptor of your circadian rhythm that interferes with sleep, hormones, mood, cognition and more.

“Thyroid hormones have circadian rhythms, too,” he writes. “Sleep deprivation from ill-timed light is associated with abnormal thyroid function.” In addition, he cited 11 other health consequences of light pollution, which include:

Inflammation Immune suppression
Disruption of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which controls the stress response Gut problems
Obesity Diabetes
Fertility and menstrual problems Cardiovascular disease
Depression and mood disorders Cognition and memory deficits
Cancer

How to Reduce Light Exposure at Night

In the modern world, avoiding light exposure at night isn’t always as simple as turning off the lights. If your bedroom is affected by light pollution, be sure to use blackout shades to keep light out or wear an eye mask when you go to sleep. Remove all sources of light from your bedroom, including a digital alarm clock.

You should also swap out LED lights with incandescent bulbs, which are less efficient at suppressing melatonin, particularly in areas where you spend most of your time during the day and evening, such as your kitchen, bathroom and bedroom. Leave the LEDs for areas such as hallways, closets, garage and porch, where your exposure to them is minimal.

When it gets to be late afternoon and evening, wear amber-colored glasses that block blue light, and turn off electronics — or at least be sure to wear the glasses while you’re using them. You can also install blue light-blocking software like Iris on your computer, cellphone and tablet.21

Part of optimizing your circadian rhythm is avoiding light at night, but the flipside is also important: if you’re in darkness all day long, your body can’t appreciate the difference and will not optimize melatonin production. So, ideally, to help your circadian system reset itself for thyroid health and overall health and wellness, avoid light at night and get at least 10 to 15 minutes of light first thing in the morning as well.

Feeling hopeless about your underactive thyroid? These two nutrients may help, study suggests

Reproduced from original article:
www.naturalhealth365.com/underactive-thyroid-zinc-selenium-3687.html

by:  | January 8, 2021

underactive-thyroid(NaturalHealth365) According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), approximately 4.6 percent of the U.S. population over 12 years old lives with hypothyroidism, with women far more likely to develop the condition than men.  Hypothyroidism, also known as underactive thyroid, occurs when your thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormones.  This diminished thyroid function can potentially lead to devastating health consequences, such as weight gain, muscle weakness, pain, depression, plus much more.

Although thyroid medications are the gold standard for managing hypothyroidism symptoms, they are certainly not the only way to nudge your thyroid gland to release more of its vital hormones.  A study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition put two nutrients to the test to see if they can help improve thyroid function.

Study questions effectiveness of medications used to treat underactive thyroid

If you live with low thyroid, you know how the condition progresses over time and symptoms worsen. Upon diagnosis, most doctors recommend patients to begin taking one of the many thyroid medications on the market, likely for the rest of their life.  This approach might sound reasonable if we did not consider the long list of possible side effects and severe long-term health consequences, such as breast cancer associated with thyroid medications.  In addition, scientists also raised questions about medication efficacy, as a whopping 40 percent of patients on thyroid medications continue to have abnormal TSH levels, according to the Colorado thyroid disease prevalence study.

Such dismal results with commonly prescribed pharmaceuticals may partially explain why researchers looked at nutrients to boost thyroid hormone levels naturally.

Supplementing with these two nutrients can increase thyroid hormone levels

In this 12-week study, researchers divided 68 obese women with underactive thyroid into four groups.

  • Group 1 received 30 milligrams of zinc (as zinc gluconate) and 200 micrograms of selenium (as selenium yeast)
  • Group 2 received 30 mg of zinc
  • Group 3 received 200 micrograms of selenium
  • Group 4 received a placebo

At the end of the study period, researchers noted significant improvements in several areas.  First, participants in the zinc-selenium group saw a 9.2 percent increase in Free T3 hormone levels.  The zinc only group had an even more remarkable, 27 percent increase.  Second, Free T4 levels also went up by 12.4 percent among patients taking both zinc and selenium.  Finally, the ratio between Free T3 and Free T4 also improved by 23.8 percent.

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Researchers concluded that yes, indeed, supplementing with zinc or zinc and selenium has a beneficial effect on thyroid function.

Discover the various ways zinc and selenium affect your thyroid

To better appreciate the above findings, let’s take a closer look at the connection between thyroid and zinc.  One of the most important functions of zinc is its role in the T4 to T3 conversion.  This process is also called the peripheral thyroid conversion, by which your body converts the inactive thyroid hormone T4 into the active hormone T3.

Although zinc is not the only nutrient playing a role in this conversion, it is undeniably the most important of all.  Zinc deficiency impairs your body’s ability to convert T4 to T3 and may lead to low thyroid development. On the contrary, maintaining adequate zinc levels can help optimize your health in multiple ways.

Selenium, an essential micronutrient for thyroid function, also boosts T4 to T3 conversion, protects the gland against damage, and plays a vital role in thyroid hormone synthesis.  Of all the organs, your thyroid contains the highest concentration of selenium in your body.

Know this before supplementing with zinc or selenium

Although avoiding deficiency in zinc and selenium is essential for optimum health, you should always consult with your healthcare professional before starting a new supplement regiment.  Taking high amounts (especially over 40 mg) of zinc for long periods can deplete copper stores in your body. If you have celiac disease or other digestive disorders, you may not be able to absorb zinc at all.

Selenium requires similar precautions as it can be toxic at high amounts.  Experts have set the daily upper limits of selenium at 400 mcg.  Brazil nuts are a popular way to ensure you meet the recommended daily intake of selenium.

Be mindful, however, that according to the NIH, one ounce, or about 4 to 6 Brazil nuts contain approximately 544 micrograms of selenium, which is more than nine times the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of 55 mcg for most adults. A good rule of thumb is to limit the number of Brazil nuts to a couple of them a day.

Sources for this article include:

NIH.gov
NIH.gov
NaturalHealth365.com
NaturalHealth365.com

The Remarkable Benefits of Low-Dose Naltrexone


Reproduced from original article:
https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/11/29/low-dose-naltrexone-benefits.aspx
Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola      Fact Checked      November 29, 2020

INTERVIEW WITH DR. SARAH ZIELSDORF AND LINDA ELSEGOOD:
Dr Mercola’s Video Interview
Download the Interview Transcript

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Low-dose naltrexone, an opiate antagonist, can benefit most autoimmune and chronic pain conditions
  • LDN is also being used as an adjunct for cancer. Research by professor Angus George Dalgleish and Dr. Wei Lou showed LDN could bring cancer cells into remission using pulsed dosing
  • When microdosed, LDN can help potentiate long-term users of opioids, allowing them to reduce their dependence and lower their required opioid dose
  • Naltrexone only briefly blocks the opioid receptor. Its chief clinical benefit is in the rebound effect, which includes an upregulation of your immune system and subsequent reduction in inflammation
  • Other conditions being treated with LDN include Lyme disease and its co-infections, fibromyalgia, SIBO, restless leg syndrome, depression, dermatological issues and even infertility

In this interview, we review some of the remarkable benefits of low-dose naltrexone (LDN), including the surprising benefits of microdosed LDN. The two experts featured in this interview are Linda Elsegood, a Briton who founded the LDN Research Trust1 in 2004, and Dr. Sarah Zielsdorf, who has a medical practice in the Chicago area in the U.S.

Elsegood, who was diagnosed with MS in 2000, has been involved in LDN research and public education for 16 years. LDN is a powerful, safe and effective treatment for many autoimmune diseases, yet few, including most health care professionals, know anything about it. Remarkably, LDN may even be helpful in the fight against COVID-19, as it acts to normalize your immune system.2

Elsegood recently published a book on LDN called “The LDN Book, Volume Two: The Latest Research on How Low Dose Naltrexone Could Revolutionize Treatment for PTSD, Pain, IBD, Lyme Disease, Dermatologic Conditions and More.” Each chapter is written by a medical professional with clinical knowledge of the drug’s use. Zielsdorf is one of the contributing authors. Elsegood also hosts a radio show called The LDN Radio Show.3

In the interview, she tells the story of how she discovered LDN and the dramatic benefits she has experienced from it. In summary, beneficial effects became apparent after about three weeks on the drug and, after 18 months, her condition had significantly improved.

We use LDN for nearly all autoimmune conditions, as an adjunct for cancer, and as a treatment for chronic pain. We also use ultra-low dose naltrexone to help potentiate pain relief for people who are on opioids and help them to be less dependent on opioid medications. ~ Dr. Sarah Zielsdorf

Zielsdorf — who has an undergraduate degree in microbiology and a master’s degree in public health microbiology and emerging infectious disease — also has a personal health story that brought her to LDN. She was diagnosed with hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) in 2003. Ten years later, she was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s, an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid.

“I learned about functional nutrition and triggers for autoimmunity, and started to do all of the things I needed to do to optimize my biomarkers, remove systemic inflammation, and was able to return to my [medical] training. I had been told that I could never have children and surprisingly became pregnant and had a daughter in my second year of training.

After having her, I [had a flareup]. It was then, in 2014, that a doctor put me on LDN. It changed my life … Once I graduated from residency, I started treating patients with a variety of issues with LDN. I’ve treated thousands of patients with LDN.”

Naltrexone — A Rare Gem of a Drug

Naltrexone in low or even microdoses is one of the few pharmaceutical drugs I wholeheartedly endorse. Not only is it remarkably safe, it’s also a profound adjunctive therapy for a wide variety of conditions. As explained by Zielsdorf:

“Naltrexone is one of the few things that actually enables our own bodies, our own immune systems, to be able to function better and really restore function.

After World War II, they were looking for more opioid medications. By accident, scientists figured out how to block the opioid receptor. They did the exact opposite of what they were supposed to do, which is to find morphine analogs for soldiers.

[In] the 1960s, they were able to synthesize naloxone and naltrexone … FDA approved it in the 1980s for opioid addiction at a dose of 50 to 100 milligrams, and then in the 1990s for alcohol dependence.

But it was Dr. Bernard Bihari and Dr. Ian Zagon in the 1970s that had this amazing idea that if you took a very small dose of naltrexone, compounding it in a clean way [down] to a few milligrams, if would briefly block the opioid receptor in the central nervous system — very briefly kissing that receptor and then unblocking it.

This upregulates the body’s immune system by increasing the opioid receptor’s own production of beta-endorphin and met-enkephalins. Beta-endorphins help with mood, pain, sleep and the immune system, and met-enkephalins are also known as opioid-derived growth factor, and there are receptors for these on many different tissues, including the thyroid.

We now use it for nearly all autoimmune conditions, as an adjunct for cancer, and as a treatment for chronic pain. We also use ultra-low dose [microdosed] naltrexone, which I wrote about, to help potentiate pain relief for people who are on opioids and help them to be less dependent on opioid medications.

I’ve actually been able to get patients off of fentanyl patches and get them off chronic oxycodone or Norco use where their pain specialists said, ‘You will never ever get off these pain medications.’ It’s been an incredible journey and I’m a huge advocate of it.”

Naloxone Versus Naltrexone

Naloxone (Narcan) is what is carried on ambulances and used in ERs and trauma bays as an antidote to an opioid overdose. When given at a high enough dose, naloxone or Narcan acts as a complete opioid blocker, which is why it’s used acutely when someone has taken too high a dose of an opioid.

Naltrexone blocks the opioid receptor only briefly, and by a different mechanism. When used in low dosages as LDN, the chief benefit is actually in the rebound effect, after the opioid receptor has been briefly blocked.

Foundational Treatment Strategies for Autoimmune Diseases

With regard to autoimmune diseases, it’s important to realize there are other, equally important, foundational strategies that will benefit most patients with a dysfunctional immune system. These include optimizing your vitamin D level and omega-3 index, for example.

It’s also important to eliminate potential triggers. The reason why people have an autoimmune disease is because they’re exposed to something in the environment which serves as an antigen that their body recognizes as a foreign invader, and as a result attacks it. If you can avoid those antigens, you can often suppress and frequently eliminate symptoms without anything, because you’ve removed the stimulus.

One common autoimmune trigger is lectins, found in many otherwise healthy vegetables. Zielsdorf will typically place her autoimmune patients on a Mediterranean-style paleo diet or an oligoantigenic elimination diet to optimize detoxification, liver and kidney function, and the microbiome.

Others may be placed on a nose-to-tail carnivore diet. As noted by Zielsdorf, it’s “a way of offloading and simplifying what antigens the body is seeing.” Other helpful diets in this respect include the autoimmune paleo diet and the low-histamine or low FODMAP diet.

“I am a microbiologist and I do a ton of advanced testing, and then we start looking deeper at triggers,” she says. “I used to put everybody on LDN first, but now we know that certain patients will flair because their immune system is so suppressed due to co-infections.

We see it most with Lyme disease and with yeast overgrowth. If I suspect or I have tests confirming that a patient has one of these things, or their immune system is super suppressed … I’ll work on their microbiome before I start LDN …

I test everybody’s gut, and what I see universally is you get this hyper intense intestinal permeability in these cases … What’s so interesting is a leaky gut equals a leaky brain, and we overwhelm our immune system. I do see this. The first step is getting them off the most common triggers, and sometimes I’ll be testing for lectins too.

Universally, for all of my autoimmune patients, is that they can’t eat wheat. There are over 150 antigens in wheat that you can be sensitive to … It is also desiccated with Roundup, glyphosate, right before processing, so we get that extra toxicity. I test my patients for their environmental toxic load, and I see a lot of patients with glyphosate toxicity.

The wheat that we used to eat 10,000 years ago at the beginning of agriculture is not the wheat [we now eat]. It’s not even the same chromosome number as what our bodies ate in small amounts as hunter gatherers.”

Why You Should Avoid Monogastric Animal Meats

As mentioned by Zielsdorf, a nose-to-tail carnivore diet can be an excellent intervention in some cases, especially for those whose immune function is severely suppressed. However, you should avoid monogastric animals, meaning animals that have only one stomach.

Whereas cows have two, chickens and pigs have only one. The reason for this recommendation is because conventionally factory farmed chicken and pork will be very high in the omega-6 fat linoleic acid. This is because they are typically fed corn, which is high in this type of fat. And a high linolenic acid diet can metabolically devastate your health. So, a diet high in chicken and bacon is not doing your body any favors.

Animals with two stomachs are able to fully process omega-6-rich grains and other foods, as they are equipped with gut bacteria that can break it down into a healthier fat. Aside from cows and steer, this includes buffalo, beef and lamb.

What Can LDN Treat?

Aside from autoimmune diseases, LDN is also used in the treatment of the following conditions. Bear in mind this is not a complete list. Some of these conditions have been featured in various documentaries4 produced by the LDN Research Trust. You can find links to those documentaries in the references.

Cancer5 — Research by professor Angus George Dalgleish and his colleague Dr. Wei Lou showed LDN could bring cancer cells into remission using pulse dosing.6 LDN also works synergistically with cannabidiol (CBD), and works well for cancer, autoimmunity and pain conditions
Opioid addiction, dependence and recovery7 — Using microdoses of 0.001 milligrams (1 microgram), long-term users of opioids who have developed a tolerance to the drug are able to, over time, lower their opioid dose and avoid withdrawal symptoms as the LDN makes the opioid more effective.

For opioid dependence, the typical starting dose is 1 microgram twice a day, which will allow them to lower their opioid dose by about 60%. When the opioid is taken for pain, the LDN must be taken four to six hours apart from the opioid in order to not displace the opioid’s effects

Lyme disease and its coinfections8
Fibromyalgia
Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO)
Restless leg syndrome
Depression
Dermatological issues
Infertility

General Dosing Guidelines

Dosing will, of course, depend on the condition being treated, but there are some general guidelines that can be helpful. Downloadable guides can be found on the LDN Research Trust site, and are available in several languages. Keep in mind that LDN is a drug, not something you can buy over the counter, and you need to work with a knowledgeable physician who can prescribe it and monitor your health.

“With a general pain condition, we may use 1.5 to 3 or 4.5 mg. With Hashimoto’s, we start lower and slower because patients with Hashimoto’s may actually have to reduce their thyroid hormone medication if they’re on it because they get reduction of that inflammation and they can produce more of their own thyroid hormone. So, we usually start at 0.5 mg.

For patients with mood conditions … 0.5 to 1 mg. There was an important paper that came out showing LDN is an important agent for depression, for patients who fail those meds or as an adjunct to antidepressants. PTSD patients may have to go higher. There are all sorts of strategies and you just need to find a doctor who’s well-versed in that condition.”

More Information

The LDN Research Trust’s website is an excellent resource for all things LDN. It has a variety of resources to guide patients, prescribing doctors and pharmacists alike. It also has a page where you can find LDN-literate prescribers around the world.

Of course, to learn more, be sure to pick up a copy of “The LDN Book, Volume Two: The Latest Research on How Low Dose Naltrexone Could Revolutionize Treatment for PTSD, Pain, IBD, Lyme Disease, Dermatologic Conditions and More,” and/or “The LDN Book: How a Little-Known Generic Drug ― Low Dose Naltrexone ― Could Revolutionize Treatment for Autoimmune Diseases, Cancer, Autism, Depression and More,” which is the first of the two volumes.

Both books are also available on the LDN Research Trust website, along with videos featuring all of the doctors that contributed chapters to the books. You can also check out The LDN Radio Show.9 Last but not least, LDN Research Trust is a nonprofit that depends on public donations, so if you would like to contribute to the Trust’s LDN research and education efforts, please make a donation.

Top Six Benefits of Selenium

© 6th September 2020 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter
Reproduced from original article:
www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/top-six-benefits-selenium
Posted on: Saturday, August 29th 2020 at 5:15 pm
Written By: Dr. Diane Fulton
This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2020

Did you know that selenium, an essential mineral, has the ability to protect your health in multiple ways and is abundant in Brazil nuts?

Selenium is an important mineral for your body and only a small amount is needed (the recommended daily intake is 55 micrograms (mcg)).[1] Due to poor soil,[2] taking certain pharmaceutical drugs such as statins[3],[4] and the normal aging process,[5] selenium is one of the most common mineral deficiencies in the world.

Selenium is linked to many healthy outcomes, including protection from diseases and reduction of disease symptoms. An easy way to help ensure your selenium level is optimal is to eat several Brazil nuts every day.

Six Top Benefits of Selenium

1. Antioxidant and Reduces Oxidative Stress

As an antioxidant, selenium is even more beneficial than vitamins A, C, D and E and helps to decrease oxidative stress, which is the result of an imbalance in the body between free radicals and antioxidants.[6]

Oxidative stress contributes to a variety of diseases such as diabetesatherosclerosis (hardening of the blood vessels), inflammatory conditionshigh blood pressureheart diseaseneurodegenerative diseases (such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s) and cancers and contributes to aging.[7]

Supplementing with selenium was reviewed in 13 studies showing significant impact on three antioxidant markers, thus reducing oxidative stress.[8]

Eating Brazil nuts (approximately three per day for 12 weeks) was found to increase plasma selenium, increase enzymatic antioxidant activity of glutathione peroxidase and reduce oxidation in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in a study of 91 patients with high blood pressure and problematic lipid profiles.[9]

2. Boosts Skin Health

In a meta-analysis of 27 studies with a total of 1,315 patients and 7,181 healthy controls, selenium levels were found to be low in patients with four skin diseases: psoriasis, acne vulgaris, chloric acne and atopic dermatitis.[10]

Another research study of DNA reprogramming  of inflammatory cells confirms that higher selenium levels may instill protective properties for genes important for psoriasis prevention and treatment.[11]

Selenium was also found to be beneficial in the treatment of psoriasis in a systematic review of research.[12] In addition, selenium has been related to improvements in skin aging (skin elasticity and skin roughness).[13]

Blood glutathione peroxidase (low levels indicate increased damage to cell membranes due to accumulation of free radicals and signify low selenium levels)[14] was measured in 61 healthy subjects and 506 patients with various skin disorders (i.e., psoriasis, eczema, atopic dermatitis, vasculitis, mycosis fungoides and dermatitis herpetiformis, pemphigoid, acne conglobata, polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematodes) and supplementation with selenium and vitamin E restored the skin’s balance.[15]

3. Benefits Asthma

Asthma (a condition with breathing difficulties, coughing and sneezing) is a complicated disease to treat and is associated with increased inflammation, oxidative stress and abnormal immune system function. In a meta-analysis of 40 studies, asthma patients showed significantly lower levels of selenium compared to healthy subjects, suggesting lower selenium intake could be a risk factor for the disease.[16]

As mentioned, selenium, as an antioxidant, has been found to lower oxidative stress. This,in turn, seems to reduce allergic asthma.[17] In addition, dietary selenium as an antioxidant therapy may be important in optimizing asthma treatment and prevention.[18]

In a study of 25 asthmatic patients and 25 healthy subjects, asthmatics had lower concentrations of selenium, increased oxidative stress markers and inflammation and decreased antioxidant glutathione peroxidase activity and lung function.[19]

Nutritional supplement therapy including selenium balanced oxidant stress, inflammation and immune system responses, pulmonary function and health-related quality of life in patients with mild to moderate allergic asthma.[20]

4. Helps Prevent and Improve Thyroid Diseases

Selenium is an essential micronutrient for your body and readily found in the thyroid. As a supplement, it can help prevent immune-mediated thyroid disorders by reducing anti-thyroperoxidase antibody levels and improving thyroid ultrasound features.[21]

The prevalence of pathological thyroid conditions (hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroiditis, enlarged thyroid) was significantly lower in the adequate-selenium group than in the low-selenium group (18% versus 30.5%) in a sample of 6,152 subjects in China.[22]

Selenium administration (200 milligrams per day) significantly improved quality of life, reduced ocular involvement and slowed progression of 159 patients with mild Graves’ orbitopathy (also called thyroid eye disease).[23]

5. Promotes Heart Health

The combination of high blood pressure, high blood sugar, obesity and high cholesterol is called metabolic syndrome and when these conditions occur together, they dramatically increase your risk of heart disease, stroke and Type 2 diabetes.[24]

In a study of 2,069 patients, dietary selenium intake had a moderate negative association with metabolic syndrome.[25] In a study of 501 British volunteers aged 60 to 74 years, supplementation with selenium (100 mcg, 200 mcg, 300 mcg) showed progressive decreases in total cholesterol profiles for those with low selenium levels, but cautions that those with already high selenium intake might be adversely affected by extra selenium supplementation.[26]

In a 12-year follow-up of a group of healthy elderly participants who were supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years, there was a significantly reduced risk for cardiovascular mortality in the treatment group (28.1%) compared to the placebo group (38.7%).[27]

6. Brain Boosting

Alzheimer’s disease, a devastating brain disorder, is characterized by two pathological protein deposits, the senile plaques of amyloid-β and tangles of protein tau. In addition, oxidative stress and neural signal transmission disorders also impact Alzheimer’s.

A large body of studies suggests that selenium (Se), either as Se-containing compounds or as selenoproteins, is involved in most of the molecular pathways that are important in the progression of dementia and therefore have the potential to help prevent or improve Alzheimer’s.[28]

In a mouse model, selenium yeast showed several benefits for Alzheimer’s subjects; it decreased the generation of amyloid-β and enhanced autophagic clearance (old cells are recycled and cleaned out to make room for new cells in the brain), which reduced the burden of amyloid-β accumulation.[29]

Another animal study confirmed that selenium (sodium selenite) significantly decreased tau-positive neurons and reversed Alzheimer’s-like memory and neuropsychiatric symptoms in mice with advanced dementia.[30] Additionally, selenium induced protective effects against experimental dementia-induced brain inflammation and oxidative stress by enhancing the antioxidant system in rats.[31]

In 79 Alzheimer’s patients, probiotic and selenium co-supplementation for 12 weeks improved cognitive function and some metabolic profiles such as lipid, antioxidant and insulin levels.[32]  Selenium and zinc are essential trace elements and an inadequate dietary intake has been implicated in the decline of immune and cognitive functions in aged persons and influences age-related disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Type 2 diabetes.[33]

Selenium and Health

Selenium, a widely researched essential mineral, is beneficial to your health due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, immunomodulatory (regulates immune functions) and cardioprotective properties. See more research about the effects of selenium deficiency and selenium supplementation on overall well-being at GreenMedInfo.com.

 


References

[1]  Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health, Factsheets, Selenium.  https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Selenium-HealthProfessional/#en39

[2] Gerrad D. Jones, Boris Droz, Peter Greve, Pia Gottschalk, Deyan Poffet, Steve P. McGrath, Sonia I. Seneviratne, Pete Smith, Lenny H. E. Winkel. Climate change affects selenium deficiency risk Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Mar 2017, 114 (11) 2848-2853; doi: 10.1073/pnas.1611576114

[3] Andrea Kromer, Bernd Moosmann. Statin-induced liver injury involves cross-talk between cholesterol and selenoprotein biosynthetic pathways. Mol Pharmacol. 2009 Jun;75(6):1421-9. Epub 2009 Mar 30. PMID: 19332511

[4] Bernd Moosmann, Christian Behl. Selenoprotein synthesis and side-effects of statins. Lancet. 2004 Mar 13;363(9412):892-4. PMID: 15031036

[5] Cai, Zhonglin & Zhang, Jianzhong & Hongjun, Li. (2018). Selenium, aging and aging-related diseases. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research. doi.10.1007/s40520-018-1086-7.

[6] Best Medicine Book. info, Top 5 Health Benefits of Seleniumhttps://bestmedicinebook.info/top-5-health-benefits-of-selenium/

[7]  Healthline.com, Health, Oxidative Stress. https://www.healthline.com/health/oxidative-stress

[8] Motahareh Hasani, Shirin Djalalinia, Maryam Khazdooz, Hamid Asayesh, Maryam Zarei, Armita Mahdavi Gorabi, Hossein Ansari, Mostafa Qorbani, Ramin Heshmat. Effect of selenium supplementation on antioxidant markers: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Hormones (Athens). 2019 Dec ;18(4):451-462. Epub 2019 Dec 10. PMID: 31820398

[9] Grazielle V B Huguenin, Glaucia M Oliveira, Annie S B Moreira, Tatiana D Saint’Pierre, Rodrigo A Gonçalves, Alessandra R Pinheiro-Mulder, Anderson J Teodoro, Ronir R Luiz, Glorimar Rosa. Improvement of antioxidant status after Brazil nut intake in hypertensive and dyslipidemic subjects.  Nutr J. 2015 ;14:54. Epub 2015 May 29. PMID: 26022214

[10] Jun Lv, Ping Ai, Shuying Lei, Faqiong Zhou, Shangzhou Chen, Yang Zhang. Selenium levels and skin diseases: systematic review and meta-analysis. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2020 May 20 ;62:126548. Epub 2020 May 20. PMID: 32497930

[11] Hristina Kocic, Giovanni Damiani, Bojana Stamenkovic, Michael Tirant, Andrija Jovic, Danica Tiodorovic, Ketty Peris. Dietary compounds as potential modulators of microRNA expression in psoriasis. Ther Adv Chronic Dis. 2019 ; doi: 10:2040622319864805. Epub 2019 Aug 7. PMID: 31431821.

[12] Janelle R Ricketts, Marti J Rothe, Jane M Grant-Kels. Nutrition and psoriasis. Clin Dermatol. 2010 Nov-Dec;28(6):615-26. PMID: 21034986.

[13] D Segger, F Schönlau. Supplementation with Evelle improves skin smoothness and elasticity in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study with 62 women. J Dermatolog Treat. 2004 Jul;15(4):222-6. PMID: 15764035.

[14] Mayo Clinic Labs, Clinical and Interpretive. https://www.mayocliniclabs.com/test-catalog/Clinical+and+Interpretive/9765

[15] L Juhlin, L E Edqvist, L G Ekman, K Ljunghall, M Olsson. Blood glutathione-peroxidase levels in skin diseases: effect of selenium and vitamin E treatment. Acta Derm Venereol. 1982 ;62(3):211-4. PMID: 6179360

[16] Meng Chen, Yongye Sun, Yili Wu. Lower circulating zinc and selenium levels are associated with an increased risk of asthma: evidence from a meta-analysis. Public Health Nutr. 2019 Nov 5:1-8. Epub 2019 Nov 5. PMID: 31685060

[17] Norton RL, Hoffmann PR. Selenium and asthma. Mol Aspects Med. 2012 Feb;33(1):98-106. doi: 10.1016/j.mam.2011.10.003 Epub 2011 Oct 15. PMID: 22024250; PMCID: PMC3246085.

[18] Riedl MA, Nel AE. Importance of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis and treatment of asthmaCurr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008;8(1):49-56. doi: 10.1097/ACI.0b013e3282f3d913, PMID: 18188018

[19] Chih-Hung Guo, Po-Jen Liu, Simon Hsia, Chia-Ju Chuang, Pei-Chung Chen. Role of Certain Trace Minerals in Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, CD4/CD8 Lymphocyte Ratios and Lung Function in Asthmatic PatientsAnn Clin Biochem. 2011 Jul;48(Pt 4):344-51. PMID: 21546427, doi: 10.1258/acb.2011.010266. Epub 2011 May 5.

[20] Guo CH, Liu PJ, Lin KP, Chen PC. Nutritional supplement therapy improves oxidative stress, immune response, pulmonary function, and quality of life in allergic asthma patients: an open-label pilot study. Altern Med Rev. 2012 Mar;17(1):42-56. PMID: 22502622.

[21] Liliana R Santos, Celestino Neves, Miguel Melo, Paula Soares. Selenium and Selenoproteins in Immune Mediated Thyroid Disorders. Diagnostics (Basel). 2018 Oct 4 ;8(4). Epub 2018 Oct 4. PMID: 30287753

[22] Qian Wu, Margaret P Rayman, Hongjun Lv, Lutz Schomburg, Bo Cui, Chuqi Gao, Pu Chen, Guihua Zhuang, Zhenan Zhang, Xiaogang Peng, Hua Li, Yang Zhao, Xiaohong He, Gaoyuan Zeng, Fei Qin, Peng Hou, Bingying Shi. Low population selenium status is associated with increased prevalence of thyroid disease. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Aug 25, doi: 10.1210/jc.2015-2222, Epub 2015 Aug 25. PMID: 26305620.

[23] Marcocci C, Kahaly GJ, Krassas GE, Bartalena L, Prummel M, Stahl M, et al. Selenium and the course of mild Graves’ orbitopathy. N Engl J Med 2011;364:1920-31. PMID: 21591944, doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1012985

[24]  Mayo Clinic, Diseases – Conditions, Metabolic Syndrome. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/metabolic-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20351916

[25] Wei J, Zeng C, Gong QY, Li XX, Lei GH, Yang TB. Associations between Dietary Antioxidant Intake and Metabolic Syndrome. PLoS One. 2015 Jun 22;10(6):e0130876. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0130876. PMID: 26098747; PMCID: PMC4476578.

[26] Margaret P Rayman, Saverio Stranges, Bruce A Griffin, Roberto Pastor-Barriuso, Eliseo Guallar Effect of Supplementation With High-Selenium Yeast on Plasma Lipids: A Randomized Trial. Ann Intern Med. 2011 May 17; 154(10): 656-665. DOI: 10.7326/0003-4819-154-10-201105170-00005. PMID: 21576533.

[27] Urban Alehagen, Jan Aaseth, Jan Alexander, Peter JohanssonStill reduced cardiovascular mortality 12 years after supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years: A validation of previous 10-year follow-up results of a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial in elderly. PLoS One. 2018 ;13(4):e0193120. Epub 2018 Apr 11. PMID: 29641571

[28] Du Xiubo, Wang Chao, Liu Qiong. Potential Roles of Selenium and Selenoproteins in the Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease. Curr Top Med Chem. 2015 Aug 26. Epub 2015 Aug 26. PMID: 26311427

[29] Guo-Li Song, Chen Chen, Qiu-Yan Wu, Zhong-Hao Zhang, Rui Zheng, Yao Chen, Shi-Zheng Jia, Jia-Zuan Ni. Selenium-enriched yeast inhibitedβ-amyloid production and modulated autophagy in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Metallomics. 2018 Jul 25. Epub 2018 Jul 25. PMID: 30043821

[30] Ann Van der Jeugd, Arnaldo Parra-Damas, Raquel Baeta-Corral, Carlos M Soto-Faguás, Tariq Ahmed, Frank M LaFerla, Lydia Giménez-Llort, Rudi D’Hooge, Carlos A Saura. Reversal of memory and neuropsychiatric symptoms and reduced tau pathology by selenium in 3xTg-AD mice. Sci Rep. 2018 Apr 24 ;8(1):6431. Epub 2018 Apr 24. PMID: 29691439

[31] Kadir Demirci, Mustafa Nazıroğlu, İshak Suat Övey, Hasan Balaban. Selenium attenuates apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in the blood and brain of aged rats with scopolamine-induced dementia. Metab Brain Dis. 2016 Sep 15. Epub 2016 Sep 15. PMID: 27631101

[32] Omid Reza Tamtaji, Reza Heidari-Soureshjani, Naghmeh Mirhosseini, Ebrahim Kouchaki, Fereshteh Bahmani, Esmat Aghadavod, Maryam Tajabadi-Ebrahimi, Zatollah Asemi. Probiotic and selenium co-supplementation, and the effects on clinical, metabolic and genetic status in Alzheimer’s disease: A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. Clin Nutr. 2018 Dec 10. Epub 2018 Dec 10. PMID: 30642737

[33] Holger Steinbrenner, Lars-Oliver Klotz. Selenium and zinc: “antioxidants” for healthy aging? Z Gerontol Geriatr. 2020 May 28. Epub 2020 May 28. PMID: 32468295

DianeFulton

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

Daily dose of baking soda may help combat autoimmune disease

Reproduced from original article:
www.naturalhealth365.com/autoimmune-disease-baking-soda-3415.html

by:  | May 25, 2020

autoimmune-disease(NaturalHealth365) According to the National Institutes of Health, over 23 million Americans currently live with some type of autoimmune disease – which can encompass such potentially debilitating conditions as rheumatic arthritis, lupus, irritable bowel disease, type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Autoimmune diseases – which arise when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own organs, tissues and cells – are notoriously complex and difficult to treat.

But encouraging research shows that a common, familiar household staple – baking soda – can function as a potent weapon against them.

A recent study not only revealed baking soda’s ability to fight autoimmune disease – but showcased its ability to work at the cellular and molecular level.  For a lowly cooking ingredient, baking soda seems to have some highly sophisticated and powerful effects!

Can baking soda help those suffering with autoimmune disease?

Baking soda, also known as bicarbonate of soda, has a variety of household and medical uses.

It has long been used as a natural toothpaste, a non-toxic deodorant and a cheap, quick-acting antacid to treat heartburn. In addition, some nephrologists advise small daily doses of baking soda to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease.

After clinical studies affirmed baking soda’s beneficial effects on chronic kidney disease, researchers wondered what other conditions it could improve.  And they soon had their answer.

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In a study conducted by scientists at Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University and published in April 2018 in Journal of Immunology, the team found that drinking baking soda in water every day for two weeks helped to reduce the destructive inflammation of autoimmune disorders.

The key to baking soda’s action was the way it affected mesothelial cells on the exterior of the spleen. These specialized immune cells have microvilli that sense the environment and warn when an immune response is needed in order to defend against invading pathogens.

But in autoimmune disorders, this response can be inappropriate, excessive and damaging.

Baking soda helped the cells to convey the message that a protective immune response need not be triggered. In the words of study co-author Dr. Paul O’Connor, the compound helped reassure the immune system that there was no pathogen to be fought. “It’s most likely a hamburger, not a bacterial infection,” explained Dr. O’Connor.

It’s official: Baking soda reduces the inflammatory actions of cells

Bicarbonate of soda also affects the population of immune cells called macrophages, which engulf and destroy pathogens.  The scientists found that it shifted the macrophage population to a higher percentage of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, while decreasing pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages.

Although the initial research was conducted on rats, the researchers studied healthy human volunteers as well.  And these human participants also experienced an anti-inflammatory response from the baking soda.

In addition, the group who took baking soda had more inflammation-regulating T cells, which discourage the immune system from attacking tissue.

The researchers concluded that baking soda was a “cheap, relatively safe, effective and … noninvasive method to activate cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways, which may be of benefit to patients suffering from a multitude of inflammatory disease states.”

In a separate study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found that baking soda could specifically benefit rheumatoid arthritis – an autoimmune condition. The scientists concluded that baking soda and water helped reduce inflammation and disease severity.

Baking soda’s antiviral effects are currently being studied

Scientists have found that certain pH-dependent viruses – which happen to include some influenza viruses and coronaviruses – are most able to replicate and spread under acid conditions (pH6.0) and are deactivated completely at pH 8.0.

Baking soda raises acidic pH to higher alkaline levels – a fact with exciting implications for possibly slowing the spread of COVID-19 and other viral infections. While clinical studies have yet to be performed, cell and animal studies attest to the effects of alkalinity on viruses.

In fact, baking soda has been used to fight a pandemic in the past.  In 1918 and 1919, Dr. Edward R. Hays – a physician with the U.S. Health Department – utilized baking soda against the Spanish flu, claiming that it could lead to a resolution of symptoms within 36 hours.

In addition to antiviral and inflammation-fighting effects, baking soda can improve general health in myriad other ways.  According to noted doctor and author Dr. Eddy Bettermann, baking soda increases bicarbonates in the blood – in turn increasing carbon dioxide and helping with oxygenation of body organs.

And Dr. Lynda Frassetto of the University of California notes that baking soda can reduce acidic wastes in the body – which show up as cholesterol, fatty acids, uric acid, phosphate and kidney stones.

How much baking soda should I take?

While the University of Georgia scientists did not reveal the daily amount of baking soda used in the study, many natural health experts recommend half a teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in a cup or two of water a day.

Of course, check with your doctor before using baking soda to treat kidney disease, autoimmune disorders or any other medical condition. It is especially important to seek your physician’s guidance if you have high blood pressure, as baking soda is very high in sodium.

Health warning: To avoid possible gastric rupture, don’t take baking soda when your stomach is excessively full – such as after a huge meal.

While autoimmune disease can be a formidable foe, the simple, old-fashioned remedy of baking soda in water may emerge as a front-line defense against it.

Sources for this article include:

Jagwire.Augusta.Edu
DrEddyMD.com
Sciencedaily.com

Fibromyalgia

Written by Brenton Wight, Health Researcher
Updated 10th September 2020, Copyright © 1999-2021 Brenton Wight. All rights Reserved.

What is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition, typically very painful, especially in response to pressure, and sometimes patients have symptoms like stiff muscles, joints and connective tissues.
Other symptoms often include depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, difficulty swallowing, bowel and bladder problems, numbness and tingling, muscle spasms or twitching, weakness, nerve pain, palpitations,
cognitive dysfunction (“foggy thinking”).
Around 2% of the population are affected, usually between the ages of 20 and 50, although not all patients have all symptoms.
Women are nine times more likely than men to suffer from the condition, giving weight to the theory that hormones play a big part in the cause and treatment.
Diagnosis is difficult because there is no formal test. Symptoms are vague and similar to many other conditions.
Often patients with celiac disease are mistakenly diagnosed with Fibromyalgia, and do better on a gluten-free diet.
In fact, nearly everyone will do better on a gluten-free diet, or even better, a diet free from all grains, flour and any other product of grains, regardless of refined, wholemeal or any other form.
Some medical specialists say it is “all in the head” but few patients would agree with this!

Testing

Although there is no formal testing for fibromyalgia, the following tests should be arranged by the doctor to eliminate some factors that may indicate or aggravate Fibromyalgia:

  • Ferritin (Iron Study) – A serum ferritin level under 50 ng/ml means a 650% increased risk for Fibromyalgia
  • Thyroid Function – If autoimmune hypothyroidism is present, it should be treated first to see if Fibromyalgia symptoms subside
  • Other autoimmune conditions – Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis and others can resemble Fibromyalgia symptoms and should be treated first
  • CRP (C-Reactive Protein) – An inflammation marker. Source of any inflammation should be treated first
  • The FM/a blood test (plasma and PBMC (Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells) – Tests cytokine concentration. Low cytokines may indicate Fibromyalgia

Treatment

Doctors say there is no known cause or cure. However, some approaches can be very effective in reducing symptoms, including:

Therapeutic options

  • Mindfulness Training reduces psychological distress and depression
  • Yoga, Tai-Chi and other stretching exercises are helpful as they stimulate the lymph glands, increasing our HDL (good cholesterol), improving waste product and toxin removal, also reducing pain, fatigue, mood, cortisol levels and improves coping ability

Diet

  • Raw Food has been shown in studies to significantly improve the majority of fibromyalgia patients
  • Vitamin C and Broccoli consumption in a study found that the combination of 100mg of vitamin C from food, plus a 400mg broccoli supplement reduced pain by 20% and decreased 17% in Fibromyalgia impact scores

Things to avoid

Exposures to toxins definitely increase fibromyalgia risk:

  • Breast Implants have been linked to cancer, autoimmune disease, fibromyalgia and chronic pain
  • Aspartame (an artificial sweetener) should be eliminated from the diet, as it turns into formaldehyde in the body, which can aggravate fibromyalgia.
    Natural sweeteners such as Erythritol, Xylitol and pure Stevia are healthy alternatives
  • MSG (MonoSodium Glutamate) should be eliminated from the diet. Known to cause headaches and fibromyalgia
  • Vaccine Adjuvants containing mercury or aluminium have been shown to cause musculoskeletal pain conditions like fibromyalgia
  • Fluoride comes from fluoridated tap water, foods irrigated with fluoridated water, toothpaste, dental treatments and antibiotics, and must be avoided. A fluoridated water supply should be switched to rainwater and/or install a Reverse Osmosis water system for all drinking and cooking. Ordinary water filters do not remove fluoride, and even boiling water makes little difference

Prescription Medications increase risk

Many prescription medications increase risk of fibromyalgia, or actually cause it.

  • Statin Drugs reduce CoQ10 and vitamin D3, causing hundreds of health problems, including fibromyalgia and muscle pain, vastly outweighing any benefit in many cases
  • Prescription antidepressants like Celexa (Citalopram), Paxil (Paroxetine) and Prozac (Fluoxetine) include fluoride which makes fibromyalgia even worse, and causes weight gain.
    Antidepressants increase risk of cancer by over 40%, and most of the time do not work any better than a placebo
  • Many drugs contain bromide, which is even worse than fluoride, and more easily displaces iodine from the thyroid gland
  • Antibiotics destroy many bad bacteria, but also much of the good bacteria as well, compromising our immune system, which can take up to two years to rebuild
  • Paracetamol, Panadol, Tylenol and other names for acetaminophen should be avoided as studies show them to start causing liver issues even at the recommended dose two 500 mg tablets four times a day (4000 mg) for a few days. Unfortunately, patients who experience a lot of pain invariably over-dose, and just a 50% increase starts causing severe liver damage. The advertising slogan “safe and effective” is one of the biggest lies of the drug industry, and the most common cause of liver poisoning in the Western world. The majority of all patients on the liver transplant waiting list are there because of Panadol overdose. Panadol also reacts with an enzyme in the body to destroy our natural glutathione, which is one of the body’s main defenses against pathogens, often called the “master antioxidant”. Less glutathione means more Fibromyalgia

Here is a list of some drugs commonly prescribed that contain Fluoride or Bromide, two halogens that displace iodine from the thyroid and cause hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s disease, depression, weight gain, hair loss, cancer, and will aggravate Fibromyalgia:

  • Advair (fluticasone) – fluoride
  • Alphagen (brimonidine) – bromide
  • Atrovent (Ipratropium) – bromide
  • Avelox (moxifloxacin) – fluoride
  • Adovart (dulasteride) – fluoride
  • Celebrex (celecoxib) – fluoride
  • Celexa (citalopram) – fluoride and bromide
  • Cipro (ciprofloxacin) – fluoride
  • Clinoril (sulindac) – fluoride
  • Combivent (from the ipratropium) – bromide
  • Crestor (rosuvastatin) – fluoride
  • Diflucan (fluconazole) – fluoride
  • DuoNeb (nebulized Combivent) – fluoride
  • Enablex (darifenacin) – bromide
  • Flonase (fluticasone) – fluoride
  • Flovent (fluticasone) – fluoride
  • Guaifenex DM (dextromethorphan) – bromide
  • Lescol (fluvastatin) – fluoride
  • Levaquin (levofloxacin) – fluoride
  • Lexapro (escitalopram) – fluoride
  • Lipitor (atorvastatin) – fluoride
  • Lotrisone topical cream – fluoride
  • Paxil (paroxetine) – fluoride
  • Prevacid (lansoprazole) – fluoride
  • Protonix (pantoprazole) – fluoride
  • Prozac (fluoxetine) – fluoride
  • Pulmicort (budesonide) – fluoride
  • Razadyne (galantamine) – bromide
  • Risperdal (risperidone) – fluoride
  • Spiriva (tiotropium) – bromide
  • Tobra Dex (from dexamethasone) – fluoride
  • Travatan (travoprost) – fluoride
  • Triamcinolone – fluoride
  • Vigamox (moxifloxacin) – fluoride
  • Vytorin (from eztimibe) – fluoride
  • Zetia (eztimibe) – fluoride

An immune response to intestinal bacteria may cause some symptoms, so an alkaline diet with plenty of enzyme-rich raw vegetables and fresh fruit may help, along with a little cheese, yogurt, whey, fermented vegetables such as Sauerkraut, and/or supplemental probiotics such as Acidophilus
to build up beneficial intestinal bacteria. 75% of our immune system is in the gut, and this is where the immune system often first breaks down.

MSG (monosodium glutamate) has been shown to aggravate symptoms, so most processed food, which contains MSG, often hidden in the ingredients list by being called other names or chemicals, should be eliminated.

Eliminating yeast from the diet may also help. Yeast is a raising agent found in most breads and other flour-based baked foods, also Vegemite. Changing to a fresh food diet of vegetables and fruit can eliminate yeast, lose excess weight, build immunity and improve general health.

Casein from milk and other milk products may also help, although some people are sensitive to dairy products and do better with no milk or other dairy products.

Food allergies can be a problem and I would start by eliminating wheat, flour, bread, cakes, anything made from flour, sugar, soy, milk, corn, eggs and nuts for at least a week or two.
If that helps, introduce them back into the diet one at a time (except sugar, which should be omitted forever, and all flour products), until the culprit is found.

If that is not enough, see my Vaccinations article and read about the relationship between Panadol, Vaccinations, Glutathione and Autism.

Many Fibromyalgia patients also suffer from IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome), CFS (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis) and SLE or Lupus (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus), but the above treatments can improve all of these conditions.
While these natural alternatives may not work for everyone, nearly all patients report improvement in their condition, and of course, these are all good for weight loss, fighting diabetes, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, better sleep, improved mood, reduced pain, better pain tolerance, building muscle and reduced cancer risk. Many patients are deficient in GH (growth hormone) so high-intensity exercise and weight loss will help by increasing natural production of Growth Hormone.

Copyright © 1999-2021 Brenton Wight and BJ&HJ Wight trading as Lean Machine abn 55293601285. All Rights Reserved.

How trace minerals help to heal the body

Reproduced from original article:
www.naturalhealth365.com/trace-minerals-heal-3210.html
by: Natalie Robins, staff writer

sea salt(NaturalHealth365) Even if you try to eat a healthy, organic diet – you could be at risk for nutritional deficiencies without realizing it.  In fact, the National Institutes of Health concluded that “the vast majority of people in both affluent and emerging industrialized countries do not reach even 75 percent of the RDAs for numerous trace minerals.”The importance of nutrient status (and deficiencies) cannot be overstated. For example, magnesium deficiency is widespread among Americans. One study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, shows that 68% of Americans are magnesium deficient and, some experts like Carolyn Dean, MD have been warning the public for years.

Editor’s note: Sea salt is an excellent way to get trace minerals into your diet.  But, beware, most brands of sea salt are contaminated with microplastics.  Click here to discover our top pick for sea salt.

What is the importance of trace minerals?

Some minerals, such as calcium, potassium, and phosphorus, are more common in food and in your body. Trace minerals, on the other hand, are essential minerals that you only need in trace amounts.

The following is a condensed look at certain minerals and their purpose in the body:

  • Chromium is necessary for proper regulation of blood sugar and improves insulin sensitivity.
  • Cobalt is present in vitamin B12 and it is necessary for generating healthy, red blood cells.
  • Zinc allows for proper immune response, growth, antioxidant function and wound healing.
  • Selenium is necessary for proper antioxidant function and liver detoxification. It is also essential for healthy muscles and hair.
  • Iodine is necessary for your body to make thyroid hormone – which is involved in almost every process in your body including energy metabolism and temperature regulation.

Bottom line, trace minerals are essential to protect against common health issues, such as heart disease, diabetes, and cognitive decline. Without enough trace minerals, you’re also susceptible to contamination from heavy metals such as arsenic, mercury and lead.

Do NOT ignore the health dangers linked to toxic indoor air.  These chemicals – the ‘off-gassing’ of paints, mattresses, carpets and other home/office building materials – increase your risk of headaches, dementia, heart disease and cancer.

Get the BEST indoor air purification system – at the LOWEST price, exclusively for NaturalHealth365 readers.  I, personally use this system in my home AND office.  Click HERE to order now – before the sale ends.

Why modern farming techniques MUST change to help save humanity

Why aren’t Americans getting enough trace minerals from their food supply?  Obviously, we should be looking at soil content.  Over the past century, the quality of our soil has been depleted by 85 percent – mainly due to modern methods of farming.

The agricultural sector is driven by crop yield, using every possible method to increase the number of pounds harvested. Intensive farming, combined with soil erosion, has resulted in soil with a lower mineral content. To make matters worse, chemical fertilizers are insufficient to replace the minerals needed for optimal health and poison the environment.

The singular focus on agricultural yield comes at the expense of nutritious food products and the nutritional status and health of Americans. Fruits and vegetables are now grown in soil with a lower nutrient content than in the past. A study in Canada found that tomatoes, spinach, cabbage, and lettuce have on average one-eighth the mineral content today than they did at the beginning of the 20th century.

The ocean provides a natural way to correct mineral deficiencies

If you just can’t depend on the produce section of your supermarket, how can you give your body the nutrients it needs to heal your body? The answer may lie in the ocean, which is rich in minerals.

They’re in their complete, non-denatured form, which is the form most beneficial (and recognizable) to the human body.

If you have the time and space, you can grow your own fruits and vegetables using ocean trace minerals to fertilize them. Another option is to eat seaweed, either as a food or as a supplement. Sea vegetable capsules are another source of minerals, and sea vegetables also contain health-promoting compounds such as fucoidan – which can help lower your risk for disease.

Of course, like with any other food, it’s important to know the source – to minimize the risk of consuming toxic chemicals in the food supply.

Editor’s note:  If you want to avoid mineral deficiencies – I encourage you to investigate the health benefits of QuintEssential Optimum Mineralization 3.3.  This super clean product is now available, in limited supply, at the NaturalHealth365 Store.  And, yes, I’ve personally been using this high-quality product for over 4 years!

Sources for this article:

Personalhealthfacts.com
Healthy-Vegetable-Gardening.com

Do Synthetic Thyroid Hormones Work?

© 19th November 2019 GreenMedInfo LLC.
This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC.
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Reproduced from original article:
https://www.greenmedinfo.health/blog/do-synthetic-thyroid-hormones-work

Posted on: Tuesday, November 19th 2019 at 11:45 am
Written By: Kelly Brogan, M.D.

Originally published on www.kellybroganmd.com
If you walk into a doctor’s office and tell a conventional doctor that you’re depressedgaining weightfatigued, having trouble concentrating, cold, and constipated, chances are that the doctor would tell you that it’s depression, aging, or just stress, and that’s why you’re feeling the way you do. They might prescribe you some medication and off you go.

But one thing that the doctor might fail to realize is that those very symptoms of depression also double as symptoms of a commonly underdiagnosed condition–namely hypothyroidism. An underperforming thyroid (hypothyroidism) is one of the most underdiagnosed conditions in America, yet it’s incredibly common–especially in women. Over 20% of all women have a “lazy” thyroid but only half of those women gets diagnosed. Science has known about the relationship between a dysfunctional thyroid and symptoms of depression for a long time.1 2 Depression often occurs concurrently with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, which is a hormonal feedback control loop that regulates metabolism.3

So exactly how many patients are told they have depression when it’s really a thyroid problem?   A new study published in the peer-reviewed journal BMC Psychiatry is shedding a bit of new light onto that very question.

New Insight into Subclinical Hypothyroidism

In a 2019 study, researchers from several Malaysian universities used a meta-analysis technique to evaluate the association between subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) and depression amongst 12,315 individuals, hoping to further clarify the prevalence of depression in SCH and the effect of levothyroxine therapy, the most common synthetic thyroid hormone drug that is sold under the brand names of Synthroid, Tirosint, Levoxyl, Unithroid, and Levo-T.4

Though the relationship between depression and hypothyroidism has been evident to scientific research since around 200 years ago, the association between depression and hypothyroidism‘s sneakier and more subtle cousin, subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) has historically been more controversial. Subclinical hypothyroidism is an early, mild form of hypothyroidism where free hormones are low, but TSH is normal, a condition in which the body doesn’t produce enough thyroid hormones.5 It’s estimated that a whole 3-8% of the general population (usually more women than men) is affected by SCH.6

In the study results, which the researchers found by compiling the data of many other studies, researchers found that:

Patients with SCH had higher risk of depression than patients with normal thyroid function controls, which means that patients with SCH were more likely to have depressive symptoms.

In individuals with SCH and depression, levothyroxine therapy didn’t help improve their depression or symptoms.

What does that mean? The researchers found that thyroid imbalance seems to be a driver of depression–and that trying to replacing those missing hormones with the most commonly prescribed synthetic T4 hormone, levothyroxine, doesn’t actually help alleviate depressive symptoms.7

This is an interesting finding because around 20 million Americans, mostly women, have some type of thyroid problem and are prescribed synthetic thyroid hormones such as Synthroid, a brand of the levothyroxine.8 Instead of using synthetic chemicals to “fix” our bodies, which apparently isn’t really working, we should be finding the root cause of the thyroid dysfunction and take a more holistic approach in healing our bodies.

The Thyroid

To better understand why this study was interesting, we first need to understand more about the thyroid in general. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that sits at your throat just a little under the Adam’s apple. The gland produces a range of hormones, but its two most active substances are T3, the active form of thyroid hormone, and T4, the storage form of thyroid hormone. A healthy thyroid regularly secretes T3 and T4 into the bloodstream so that most of the T4 can be converted into its active form, T3, around the body, including the brain.9 To do that, the process depends on a wide variety of factors: the amount of available specialized enzymes, optimal cortisol (your stress hormone) levels, and certain nutrients such as ironiodinezincmagnesiumselenium, B vitamins, vitamin C, and vitamin D.

But thyroids do much more than pump out hormones; they also take information in from the body to adjust its own pace. The thyroid sits in the middle of a complex and dynamic web of hormones and chemicals that controls metabolism, which is how fast and efficiently cells can convert nutrients into energy. In conversation with the brain, adrenal glands, and more, the thyroid indirectly affects every cell, tissue, and organ in the body–from muscles, bones, and skin to the digestive tract, heart, and brain.

One major way that thyroids affect us is through our mitochondria, the organelles in most cells that are widely considered to be the powerhouses of the cell. Mitochondria not only help generate energy for our body to do things, but they also determine the time of cell death and more. Our mitochondria are maintained by our thyroid hormone–which is why patients whose thyroids are underperforming experience an array of symptoms, including fatigue, constipation, hair loss, depression, foggy thinking, cold body temperature, low metabolism, and muscle aches.10 That’s partially why thyroid problems have such resounding and far-reaching effects on the body. When your mitochondria aren’t being properly cared for by your thyroid hormone, everything in your body has less energy to do the work it needs to do, and everything slows down.

What Makes the Thyroid Misbehave?

It’s no surprise that so many factors go into keeping the thyroid happy. The thyroid can be thrown off balance by all sorts of reasons: chemicals and food additives, like emulsifiers (found in commercial soda), synthetic plastic chemicals, fluoride (found in much of our tap water), and mercury (from large fish), or immune responses. Importantly, this circuitry is also influenced by another hormone, cortisol,11 which is produced by your adrenal glands at the command of your brain.

When we look at adrenal function, we have to take our analyses one step farther and understand what is causing adrenals to be stressed out.12 From there, we know that the adrenal glands are affected by gutdiet, and environmental immune provocation and that many lifestyle and environmental factors can influence this relationship, which in turn, can disturb the thyroid.

Thyroid Disease is a Psychiatric Pretender

The point of all of this is to say that because of how interconnected the relationship between the thyroid and other parts of the body are, thyroid imbalance often leads to the symptoms of depression when the culprit is an unhappy thyroid. The study that we talked about earlier is helping us better understand just how prevalent mistaking thyroid imbalance, particularly subclinical hypothyroidism, for depression is.

Of course, it doesn’t help that symptoms listed above are a vague bunch and could have many causes, so conventional doctors frequently write them off as a symptom of aging, depression, or stress in the few minutes they usually spend talking with patients. The way that lab tests for hypothyroidism (both subclinical and hypothyroidism) are run and the way reference ranges are established aren’t very accurate.

Keeping a thyroid healthy is an exercise in holistic medicine that requires you to pay attention to all aspects of your lifestyle. Check out our free symptom checker to see if your thyroid might be affected, or if you have any of the other Top 5 “Psychiatric Pretenders” (common physical imbalances that show up as mental or emotional symptoms).

Interested in step-by-step support to help you optimize your health?

Vital Life Project is a community for like-minded wellness seekers in search of a better way to live with vitality in a world that can make it challenging to move toward this goal.

This monthly membership provides guidance and accountability to help you make small changes in mindset and daily routine that can lead to radical shifts in health reclamation.

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References

1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15745924?dopt=Abstract

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16723325?dopt=Abstract

3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3246784/

4. https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12888-018-2006-2

5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2664572/

6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2664572/

7. https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12888-018-2006-2

8. https://www.thyroid.org/media-main/press-room/

9. https://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/physrev.00009.2005

10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11174855

11. https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/06/19/mental-illness-hypothyroidism.aspx#_edn4

12. https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-abstract/75/6/1526/2655345

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

Difference between Carnitine and Acetyl L-Carnitine

What are Carnitines?

L-Carnitine is a food/supplement/amino acid, made in the body or ingested.
Best known for improving muscle growth, reducing excess body fat and repair of damage to the intestinal tract.
Carnitines aid fat loss by converting body fat into muscle or energy.
There are two main types of the five available, L-Carnitine and Acetyl L-Carnitine:
The Acetyl form of L-Carnitine is the biologically active version of the amino acid L-Carnitine, protecting all body cells from age-related degeneration.
The addition of the Acetyl group in the L-Carnitine molecule also allows it to pass through the blood-brain barrier where it can promote improved mental health and clarity.

Propionyl L-Carnitine is another version, less widely used.
GPLC (Glycine Propionyl-L-Carnitine) is another ester of carnitine used mainly as a sports supplement.
D-Carnitine supplements interfere with natural L-carnitine by preventing correct absorption of L-Carnitine and may also produce unwanted side-effects. This version should be avoided.

Sources of Carnitine

Carnitines come from the diet, or supplements, or the body can make them, although in smaller quantities.
The body can produce small amounts of L-Carnitine, if all precursors are present:

If the body is deficient in any of the above, carnitine production is compromised.

The Carnitine Diet

Carnitines are found in animal products, particularly red meat, so vegans are usually carnitine-deficient.
Carnitines are made in the liver and kidneys, and stored in cells of the skeletal muscles, heart, brain, and sperm.
Carnitines are classified as “non-essential amino acids”, meaning the body can make them, as distinct from the “essential amino acids” which must come from the diet or supplements,
as they cannot be made by the body.
Carnitines carry fatty acids to the mitochondria (the energy-storage area in every cell in the body) where it is converted into ATP (Adenosine triphosphate, cellular fuel).
In the cells, carnitine is available to be burned as fuel, and also removes waste products from this process.
Kidneys remove carnitine if we have too much, and if we have too little, the kidneys hold on to any remaining.
Acetyl L-Carnitine can improve immune function and reduce lipofuscin, a cell-clogging pigment.
Acetyl L-Carnitine works with CoQ10 (Co-Enzyme Q10) and ALA (Alpha Lipoic Acid)
to further improve mitochondria function.
The Mitochondria is the “energy pump” within each of the 60 trillion cells in the human body. Without correct mitochondria function, poor health is the consequence.

Difference between Acetyl L-Carnitine and L-Carnitine

Acetyl L-Carnitine is not to be confused with regular L-Carnitine.
L-Carnitine is typically used for weight loss, athletes and body building, but without the brain benefits, as L-Carnitine cannot pass the blood-brain barrier.
Acetyl L-Carnitine is a highly bio-available form, able to cross the blood-brain barrier, helps to maintain normal neurotransmitter activity, commonly used for mental health, but also has muscle-building, fat-loss, immunity and general health properties.

Acetyl L-Carnitine Benefits

Cardiovascular Conditions
Carnitine can be used in conjunction with regular drugs for angina, and may improve exercise ability without chest pain.
Carnitine may help after a heart attack in conjunction with prescription medicines, although not all studies agree.
Carnitine may reduce chance of a second heart attack, death from heart disease, chest pain, abnormal heart rhythms, heart failure, heart muscle weakness.

Peripheral Vascular Disease
Atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries, plaque build-up in the arteries) causes leg pain or cramps (intermittent claudication). Carnitine may allow more exercise before pain or cramps set in.

Diabetic Neuropathy
Diabetic neuropathy is a result of nerve damage from high blood glucose levels, causing pain and numbness, mainly in arms, legs, and feet. Acetyl-L-carnitine can reduce pain and increase feeling, and may even help regenerate nerves.

Athletic Performance
Carnitine is often used to increase performance, although evidence varies. Long-term results should improve as muscle replaces fat.

Weight Loss
L-carnitine may help reduce fat, increase muscle, reduce fatigue, and improve the mental willingness to exercise.

Alzheimer’s Disease, Memory, Cognitive Ability
Acetyl L-carnitine may slow Alzheimer’s progression, senility, dementia, and improve nerve cell health, memory and cognitive ability.

Parkinsons
Because of action on dopamine (chemical messenger between nerve cells) and dopamine receptors, Acetyl L-Carnitine may help minimise Parkinson’s symptoms, by enhancing dopamine release from dopaminergic neurons, and by improving binding of dopamine to dopamine receptors. Acetyl L-Carnitine also slows the decline in dopamine receptors as we age (which happens faster with Parkinson’s). Many researchers believe that Parkinson’s may be caused by a dopamine deficiency.  Acetyl L-Carnitine may also help to inhibit tremors in Parkinsons patients.

Male Infertility
Carnitine deficiency can lead to low sperm count and mobility. Supplemental Carnitine may help men struggling to conceive.

Erectile Dysfunction
Propionyl L-carnitine and Acetyl L-Carnitine may improve ED (Erectile Dysfunction) and may improve Viagra effectiveness for male diabetics, vegans or those recovering from prostate surgery.

Peyronie’s Disease
Peyronie’s disease is a penis curvature causing pain during erections. Acetyl L-Carnitine in studies worked better than prescription medication for reducing pain and assisted reducing penis curve, and without side-effects.

Contraindications

Carnitine can interact with some medications. Talk to your doctor if you are on any prescription medication.

Kidney Disease
Kidney disease can cause carnitine deficiency. Seek medical advice before using any supplements, especially those people on Dialysis.

Hyperthyroidism
L-carnitine may reduce symptoms of Hyperthyroidism (over-active thyroid), such as insomnia, nervousness, heart palpitations, high body temperature and tremors.
Carnitine may reduce passage of thyroid hormone into cells, so in theory, thyroid hormone replacement may become less effective.
This could be a problem for those with Hypothyroidism (low thyroid function).
If you take thyroid replacement hormone or have any thyroid issues, talk to your health care provider before taking any form of carnitine.

HIV – AIDS
AZT is medication for HIV and AIDS. L-carnitine supplements appear to protect muscle tissue from damage, a toxic side effect from AZT.

Cancer
Doxorubicin is a chemotherapy medication for cancer. L-carnitine may protect heart cells from Doxorubicin’s toxic side effects (without reducing the chemotherapy effectivness).
Always talk to your oncologist for advice with chemotherapy. If your oncologist does not know, fine one who does know.
See https://www.leanmachine.net.au/healthblog/most-oncologists-admit-they-have-no-training-to-help-patients-live-healthier-lives-new-study/

Acne Medication
Accutane (Isotretinoin) a strong medication used for severe acne which can cause liver problems, as measured by a blood test, as well as high cholesterol and muscle pain and weakness.
These symptoms are like those seen with carnitine deficiency. Researchers in Greece showed that a large group of people who had side effects from Accutane got better when taking L-carnitine compared to those who took a placebo.

Seizures
Depakote (Valproic acid) is an anti-seizure medication which can cause carnitine deficiency. L-carnitine supplements may reduce canitine deficiency and reduce side-effects of valproic acid. L-Carnitine is used medically where a patient has overdosed on Valproic Acid. However, Carnitine may increase seizure risk in those with a history or high risk of seizures, so talk to your doctor or neurologist.

Suggested Adult Use and Dosage

Acetyl L-Carnitine
As a dietary supplement, take 500mg 1 to 3 times per day. Do not exceed 1500mg per day.
LeanMachine suggests 500mg daily as a maintenance dose, and up to 1500mg spread across the day for specific conditions.
Overdosing (5000 grams per day) may cause diarrhoea.

L-Carnitine
One 250mg capsule, taken 1 to 4 times daily. Always consult a qualified medical specialist if taking prescription medication or for any serious illness.

Best buy from iherb.com:
Acetyl L-Carnitine
L-Carnitine

Updated 22nd September 2019, Copyright © 1999 – BJ & HJ Wight trading as Lean Machine abn 55293601285

Black Seed May Treat Hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s Disease), Clinical Trial Reveals

© 14th September 2019 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter
Original article:
https://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/black-seed-may-treat-hypothyroidism-hashimotos-disease-clinical-trial-reveals
Posted on: Saturday, September 14th 2019 at 7:15 am

This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2019

Black Seed May Treat Hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's Disease), Clinical Trial Reveals

A groundbreaking clinical trial indicates that the most common cause of hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease) may be improved with the addition of only two grams of powdered black seed daily

A randomized clinical trial reveals that the ancient healing food known as nigella sativa (aka “black seed”), once known as the “remedy for everything but death,” may provide an ideal treatment for the autoimmune thyroid condition known as Hashimoto’s disease, which is the most common cause of hypothyroidism.

The study published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine evaluated the effects of nigella sativa on thyroid function, serum Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) – 1, Nesfatin -1 and anthropometric features in patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

The study took 40 patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, aged between 22 and 50 years old, and randomized them into one group receiving two grams of powdered encapsulated Nigella sativa and the other 2 grams starch placebo daily for 8 weeks.. Changes in anthropometric variables, dietary intakes, thyroid status, serum VEGF and Nesfatin-1 concentrations were measured.

The positive results were reported as follows:

“Treatment with Nigella sativa significantly reduced body weight and body mass index (BMI). Serum concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies decreased while serum T3 concentrations increased in Nigella sativa-treated group after 8 weeks. There was a significant reduction in serum VEGF concentrations in intervention group. None of these changes had been observed in placebo treated group. In stepwise multiple regression model, changes in waist to hip ratio (WHR) and thyroid hormones were significant predictors of changes in serum VEGF and Nesgfatin-1 values in Nigella sativa treated group (P < 0.05).”

The researchers concluded:

“Our data showed a potent beneficial effect of powdered Nigella sativa in improving thyroid status and anthropometric variables in patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Moreover, Nigella sativa significantly reduced serum VEGF concentrations in these patients. Considering observed health- promoting effect of this medicinal plant in ameliorating the disease severity, it can be regarded as a useful therapeutic approach in management of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.”

What is Hashimoto’s Disease and Why Does Synthetic T4 Fail To Improve Well-Being

Hashimoto’s disease can be a devastating condition, especially when treated with a conventional medical approach. Also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, it is a progressive autoimmune disease where, in the many cases, the thyroid gland is eventually destroyed. It is considered the most common cause of hypothyroidism in North America. Some additional salient facts are:

  1. About 5% of the U.S. population will be affected by Hashimoto’s thyroiditis at some point in their life.

  2. Hashimoto’s occurs up to 15 times  more often in women than in men. The highest density of Hashimoto’s cases are between 30 and 60 years of age.

  3. Postpartum thyroiditis occurs in about 10% of patients.

  4. Hashimoto’s related hypothyroid is often under-diagnosed because the reference ranges were drawn from an unscreened population likely inclusive of those already suffering from suboptimal thyroid function or outright dysfunction.

The standard of care is to ‘manage,’ or artificially suppress, modulate, and/or replace hormone levels. Hypothyroidism caused by Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is most commonly treated with synthetic T4 in an attempt to reduce TSH levels under 5.0 U/ml. This often results in the appearance of TSH normalization, with downstream adverse effects, and without concomitant improvements in well-being. Dr. Kelly Brogan, MD, further elaborates:

“For those who do receive the label of hypothyroid, they remain obliquely objectified by their lab work as their doctors use synthetic T4 – Synthroid – to attempt to move their TSH within range, more often leaving them symptomatic but “treated” because of poor conversion to active thyroid hormone (T3) and suppression of natural T3 production because of their now lower TSH.”

It should be noted that while synthetic T4 is described by its manufacturer to be “identical to that produced in the human thyroid gland,” it is in actuality quite different. This has to do primarily with the fact that while the primary structure of amino acids in synthetic thyroxine produced from genetically modified yeast is virtually identical to that produced by the human thyroid gland, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary folding patterns of that protein may differ in significant ways. Known as the protein’s conformational state, a slight change in folding structure can alter function profoundly. This could account for widespread reports of dissatisfaction among those treated with synthetic thyroid versus natural forms extracted from the glands of pigs.

Even if the T4 produced synthetically were identical in structure and function to natural T4, the reality is that virtually all T4 found naturally in the human body is not found in its free state.

Moreover, T4 is found inextricably bound together with T3, T2, T1, and calcitron, in the extraordinarily complex Thyroxine Binding Globulin (TBG) protein. Clearly, therefore, pharmaceutical preparations of isolated T4 can not be considered identical to whole-food complexed thyroid hormones derived from natural extracts.

In a post titled, “Natural Desiccated Thyroid and Synthetic are NOT the Same,” from thyroid-s.com, this point is driven home powerfully:

“To graphically illustrate the huge differences between Natural Desiccated Thyroid as compared to T4 Only Synthetics, please consider this graphic. It attempts to show the tiny T4, T3, T2, T1 and Calcitonin hormones tightly bound to the very large thyroglobulin molecules as found in Natural Desiccated Thyroid. Remember that the Thyroglobulin molecule is approximately 1,000 TIMES BIGGER than the T4 molecule. Then it also shows the tiny T4 molecules as found in synthetic T4 only products. The pharmaceutical companies would have us believe these are bio-identical. We will let you decide.”

Moreover, research published in 2010 in the Archives of Pharmaceutical Research shows that levothyroxine preparations are widely contaminated with a “mirror image” stereoismer called dextro-thyroxine at a level as high as 1-6% by dry weight. D-thyroxine violates the left-handed ‘chirality’ of natural thyroxine and is a powerful, cardiotoxic endocrine disruptor.

The process by which levothyroxine sodium is produced today is highly synthetic and involves the use of a wide range of chemicals. One patent describes the dizzyingly complex process as follows:

“The process for preparation of Levothyroxine sodium comprises the steps, wherein compound obtained from steps a-g is prepared by conventional methods, a. nitrating L-tyrosine to give 3,5- dinitro-L-tyrosine, b. acetylating 3,5- dinitro-L-tyrosine to give 3,5- dinitro-N-acetyl L-tyrosine, c. esterifying the compound obtained from step (b) to give 3,5- diπitro-N-acetyl L-tyrosine ethyl ester, d. reacting the compound obtained from step (c) with p-TsCI in presence of pyridine to give corresponding tosylate salt, which is further reacting with 4-methoxy phenol to give 3,5- DinKro-4-p-methoxy phenoxy-N-acetyl-L-phenyl alanine ethyl ester, e. the compound obtained from step (d) is hydrogenated to give 3,5-diamino-4-p-methoxy phenoxy-N-acetyl-L-phenyl alanine ethyl ester, f. the compound obtained from step (e) is tetrazotized and iodized to give 3,5-Diiodo-4-p- methoxy phenoxy-N-acetyl-L-phenyl alanine ethyl ester, g. the compound obtained from step (f) is O-demethylated, N-deacetylated, and deesterified using aqueous HI in acetic acid to give 3,5-Diiodo-4-p-hydroxy phenoxy-L-pheπyl alanine followed by preparing hydrochloride salt of same and isolating, drying it h. lodinating 3,5-Diiodo-4-p-hydroxy pheπoxy-L-phenyl alanine HCI salt using methyl amine,”

Clearly, synthetic T4 treatments, even if effective at suppressing TSH, may not produce clinical outcomes that translate into improvement in well-being. Nor do they address or resolve the root causes of Hashimoto’s, which include selenium deficiency, wheat intolerance, and vitamin D/sunlight deficiency [view studies on these links on our Hashimoto’s research dashboard], along with a wide range of still yet unknown environmental, dietary, lifestyle, and mind-body factors.  Perhaps this latest study on black seed provides a new avenue for mitigating and correcting the metabolic and endocrine factors that are disturbed in Hashimoto’s disease, or at least complementing conventional treatment with a food-based approach that can improve both the subjective and objective aspects of the disease.

For more information on natural and integrative approaches to thyroid disease visit the following resource pageson GreenMedInfo.com:

To learn more about the powerful health benefits of black seed visit our research dashboard on the subject: Nigella Sativa (aka Black Seed)

 

Originally published: 2017-03-12

Article updated: 2019-09-08

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.