Warfarin – The Rat Poison Drug

Written by Brenton Wight – LeanMachine, Health Researcher
Posted 8th December 2017, Updated 4th December 2019.
Copyright © 1999-2019 Brenton Wight and BJ&HJ Wight trading as Lean Machine abn 55293601285

Why use Warfarin?

Warfarin is a blood thinner, belonging to a class of drugs known as anti-coagulants, designed to keep blood thin and prevent clots. They make it hard for clots to form, which is a good thing if we are trying to prevent an ischemic (blood blockage) stroke, but a bad thing if we have a hemorrhagic (bleeding)stroke.
It is the most often prescribed drug prescribed for AF (atrial fibrillation), a type of irregular heartbeat, where upper chambers of the heart quiver instead of contracting efficiently, affecting millions of people.
Although AF is not necessarily life-threatening by itself, it can increase risk of blood clots which can break free to cause an ischemic stroke if the clot lodges in a brain artery, or pulmonary thrombosis if lodged in a lung artery.
However, there are down sides.
– Warfarin makes it difficult to stop a cut from bleeding.
– Warfarin increases risk of a hemmorhagic stroke (bleeding in the brain).
– Warfarin increases risk of intestinal bleeding.
– Warfarin increases risk of an aneurysm where a blood vessel ruptures.
– Warfarin increases risk of uncontrolled bleeding due to a fall or accident.

The Warfarin Study

A new study shows that Warfarin (marketed under the name Coudamin), a heart drug taken by millions of people, increases dementia risk 300%.
This study, led by Dr. T. Jared Bunch, was conducted by the Intermountain Healthcare Clinical Pharmacist Anticoagulation Service, based in Salt Lake City, and examined the medical records of more than 10,000 patients.
Dr Bunch presented the study results at the Heart Rhythm Society’s annual meeting in San Francisco.
The findings were:

  • Patients with erratic warfarin levels have a higher risk of small clots, or small bleeds in the brain, causing dementia
  • AF patients have three times the risk of dementia compared to those who take warfarin for other conditions
  • Some foods, drinks, antibiotics and other drugs alter warfarin blood levels quickly. Regular blood tests and dose variations are essential to maintain the correct range
  • The dementia risk increases to four times higher if the dose is not exactly right or requires frequent adjustment

History of Rat Poison

The University of Wisconsin developed the drug as a rat poison in the 1940’s. It kills rodents by invoking bleeding. Rats bleed to death after ingesting the poison.
Endo Laboratories began selling it for human use in the 1950’s, but Warfarin proved to be a management problem for doctors and patients. Bad reactions to many foods and some drugs, especially antibiotics, are common with Warfarin treatment.

Warfarin Side Effects

Another study by New England Journal of Medicine showed that warfarin accounts for double the emergency hospitalizations than any other drug, and is the leading cause of emergency room visits by seniors.
Apart from dementia, warfarin causes internal bleeding, stomach ulcers, kidney failure, and chronic cough. Hillary Clinton takes warfarin, and has suffered a severe cough while campaigning in 2016.
Of course, given that dementia is a common problem with seniors, and the risk for dementia is three to four times higher, more dementia means more missed or doubled-up doses of Warfarin, sometimes leading to death of the patient.

Prescription Alternatives

There are a few options:

  • Apixaban (Eliquis)
  • Dabigatran (Pradaxa)
  • Edoxaban (Savaysa)
  • Rivaroxaban (Xarelto)

Whichever we use, there is always a risk of bleeding problems.
The new medications have a reduced risk of bleeding, and wear off faster than warfarin, so appear to be safer.
However, dangerous bleeding while taking warfarin can be controlled with Vitamin K, or a combination of PCC (prothrombin complex concentrate) and fresh frozen plasma.
The amount of vitamin K in the diet, contained in leafy green vegetables, determines the effectiveness of Warfarin, so we must consistently eat the same foods. We can eat salads (and we should) but we have to eat them all the time with warfarin. This is not a problem for the new drugs because Vitamin K does not interfere with their operation. If we ate plenty of salads regularly throughout our life, we would probably never need warfarin!
Praxbind (idarucizumab) can be used in emergencies to reverse the anti-clotting effects of Pradaxa.
Other drugs to reverse blood-thinning are still in development.
Xarelto currently (in 2019) has no approved antidote, meaning that an overdose or a bleed from, say, a fall resulting in a nasty bump on the head, could cause death by a brain bleed.
Because Xarelto and others have no really effective antidote, bleeding is difficult to control. Given that many seniors with poor cognitive function are taking these drugs, overdosing is common, and can cause death. A horrifying sight in the emergency room is a patient bleeding from the nose, eyes, fingernails, toenails etc.

Drugs and Lifestyle

The new drugs are more convenient in that they do not require as many blood tests as warfarin, which requires testing at least monthly, after getting the initial dose right, where the starting dose is high, followed by a maintenance dose, and blood tests are required every 2 to 3 days until the levels stabilise.
Apart from the inconvenience of regular blood testing, many people do not like getting stuck with a needle so often.

Interaction with Other Medications

Some prescription drugs, some supplements and some foods interfere with warfarin, while others make warfarin work too well, which can cause a major bleeding problem.
Some seniors have presented at the emergency room with blood coming from all fingernails, toenails, eyes, nose, mouth, etc.
Often the slightest bump in the body results in extensive bruising, and a small cut results in excessive bleeding.
There is an enormous list of medications that interact with warfarin. The newer blood thinners also have interactions, but nowhere near as many.
The new blood thinners have some benefits over warfarin, but if we manage our warfarin well, there is no need to change. However, if we have kidney failure or mechanical heart valves the new medications may not be safe.

Natural Alternatives

Warfarin patients whose dosages often change should ask their doctor for alternative medications, as other blood thinners have fewer potential problems.
Aspirin is another blood-thinning medication given to those with cardiovascular problems, but again, can cause massive problems with internal bleeding, loss of eyesight from Macular Degeneration (bleeding and expansion of blood vessels in the retina), or hemmorhagic stroke (brain bleed).
Natural remedies work well for some people, and here are a few known to work:

These or other natural alternatives may require Warfarin levels to be lowered. Thinning the blood too much while taking Warfarin may be very dangerous.
Green leafy vegetables, high in vitamin K, act as an antidote to warfarin, requiring higher dosage for effectiveness, but a change in diet will cause a higher risk of bleeding.

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Disclaimer

LeanMachine is not a doctor, and everyone should consult with their own health professional before taking any product to ensure there is no conflict with existing prescription medication.
LeanMachine has been researching nutrition and health since 2011 and has completed many relevant studies including:
Open2Study, Australia – Food, Nutrition and Your Health
RMIT University, Australia – Foundations of Psychology
Swinburne University of Technology, Australia – Chemistry – Building Blocks of the World
University of Washington, USA – Energy, Diet and Weight
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA – Health Issues for Aging Populations
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA – International Nutrition
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA – Methods in Biostatistics I
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA – Methods in Biostatistics II
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA – Principles of Human Nutrition
TUFTS University, USA – Nutrition and Medicine
TUFTS University, USA – Lipids/Cardiovascular Disease I and Lipids/Cardiovascular Disease II
Technical Learning College, USA – Western Herbology, Identification, Formulas
Bath University, England – Inside Cancer
WebMD Education – The Link Between Stroke and Atrial Fibrillation
WebMD Education – High Potassium: Causes and Reasons to Treat
Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands – Anatomy of the Abdomen and Pelvis
MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) – A Clinical Approach to the Human Brain
LeanMachine has now examined thousands of studies, journals and reports related to health and nutrition and this research is ongoing.

Posted 8th December 2017, Updated 4th December 2019. Copyright © 1999-2019 Brenton Wight and BJ & HJ Wight trading as Lean Machine abn 55293601285





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